southwest portland

West Portland Town Center plan looks to major changes at ‘Crossroads’

Lisa Caballero (Southwest Correspondent) by on November 30th, 2020 at 2:49 pm

Concept of the Crossroads in the future.
(Source: Portland BPS West Portland Town Center Open House)

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Southwest Portland needs more 20 mph streets

Lisa Caballero (Southwest Correspondent) by on November 19th, 2020 at 9:49 am

Kids walking in the bike lane on SW Vista Avenue, a residential collector street with a 25 mph speed limit.
(Photo: Ryan Fedie)

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Key bike route into Southwest Hills poised for makeover

Lisa Caballero (Southwest Correspondent) by on November 2nd, 2020 at 4:53 pm

New sharrow and wayfinding signage installed over the weekend at SW Talbot Rd and Fairmount Blvd.
(Photo: Lisa Caballero)

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SW Portland’s top priority, $26 million project clears final hurdle

Avatar by on October 22nd, 2020 at 9:58 am

(Existing conditions on the left, future conditions on the right.)[Read more…]

PBOT opts for new signal, crosswalks at notorious Multnomah/Garden Home intersection

Avatar by on May 8th, 2019 at 9:48 am

Future design of SW Multnomah at Garden Home. View is looking northeast. (Graphic: PBOT)

A notoriously high-stress intersection in southwest Portland with a dubious crash history will get a $2.1 million update that will include new traffic signals, crosswalks, bike lanes and medians.
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How one Portlander made the route to his daughter’s school safer

Avatar by on January 31st, 2019 at 11:02 am

Car stopped at no parking sign in front of Bridlemile Elementary School in southwest Portland.
(Photos: David Stein)

Publisher’s note: This post is by southwest Portland resident David Stein. He shares the story behind a local project he worked on as part of the much-heralded PSU Traffic & Transportation Class. It’s a great example of how to identify and tackle a nagging street safety problem and we hope it’s an inspiration to some of you. Stein is also a member of the PBOT Bicycle Advisory Committee.

As a student project in the Portland State University Traffic and Transportation course, I decided to try improving a safe route to Bridlemile Elementary in southwest. In the class we’re told, “You have a PhD in your neighborhood,” and the leaders encourage us to make Portland a better place through a class project.
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PBOT unveils new designs, online survey for SW Multnomah/Garden Home project

Avatar by on December 20th, 2018 at 2:47 pm

Latest design from PBOT. Note the prohibition on driving via 69th on the right.

Unfortunately we posted our story on the City of Portland’s SW Multnomah/Garden Home intersection project one day too soon.

This morning PBOT sent over the latest concept designs, which show significant changes from the designs many of you are discussing over on yesterday’s post. They’ve also just released an online survey to formally capture feedback.

The two basic concepts we shared yesterday are still the ones under consideration; either a roundabout or a signalized configuration. But check out these new drawings before making up your mind. PBOT has supplied aerial and on-the-street views of each one.

And make sure to note that both designs show PBOT’s proposal would close off the southern section of SW 69th while maintaining access only for people on bikes and foot.
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SW Multnomah/Garden Home project is an opportunity for a better bikeway

Avatar by on December 19th, 2018 at 2:33 pm


*Two concepts under consideration by PBOT

(UPDATE, 12/20: PBOT has just released new designs and the online survey. Check it out here.)

Big changes are coming to a crash-prone intersection in Southwest Portland thanks to a $2.1 million project co-sponsored by the transportation departments of Portland and Washington County.

The two agencies will split costs to update the intersection of SW Multnomah Boulevard, Garden Home Road and 69th Avenue. The goal of the project is to reduce crashes, improve sight distance, reduce vehicle delays and improve bicycling and walking conditions.[Read more…]

First look: The tiny (yet important) cycle-track on SW Terwilliger at Capitol Highway

Avatar by on May 3rd, 2017 at 11:17 am

New bikeway SW Terwilliger and Cap Hwy-1.jpg

It might not look like much, but it makes a big difference.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

“The changes are a big improvement.”
— Barbara Stedman, southwest Portland resident

Slowly but surely, the City of Portland is improving bikeways in southwest. Case in point are the recently completed changes to the intersection of SW Capitol Highway and Terwilliger (a.k.a the “teardrop”).

People who ride in this area know the intersection well because it was a common place for close-calls. I experienced this first-hand during a ride-along with a southwest Portland family in 2012 (see photo below). The curvature of the road, mixed with the unprotected bike lane was a bad combination. Fortunately a Portland Water Bureau project provided the impetus to finally fix the bikeway and make something much safer (and we were fortunate that a volunteer advocate spoke up to make sure it happened – thanks Keith Liden!).

Before I share more photos of the new bikeway, here’s how it used to look (note the pinch-point and how the younger rider opts wisely for the sidewalk):[Read more…]

Willamette Greenway trail link might wait decades if Tesla plan goes through

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 4th, 2016 at 2:54 pm

tesla gap

(Image: Bob Cronk via South Waterfront Facebook group)

Half a mile south of the lonely riverside trail segment derided recently by The Oregonian as a “pathway to nowhere,” the city could miss a chance at a key connection.

Last week, Tesla Motors filed an application to convert an old metal-parts warehouse between Macadam Avenue and the Willamette River into an auto showroom.

But for people who would like to see a continuous riverside trail here, there’s bad news: a special section of city code exempts projects in the South Waterfront from having to connect greenway trail segments on their property unless they’re adding at least 50,000 square feet of new floor space. Because Tesla only plans to remodel the warehouse, not expand it, the unused space behind its shop wouldn’t have to redevelop.

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