About Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

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Jonathan Maus is the publisher and editor-in-chief of BikePortland.org.

You can reach him via email at jonathan [at] bikeportland [dot] org. If you have an urgent matter, please use our 24HR Tipline - (503) 706-8804.


Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) Post Archive

Jobs of the Week: Splendid Cycles, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Velotech

Friday, October 20th, 2017

Looking for a new place to spread you cycling wings? We’ve got three freshly listed job opportunities for you to peruse.

Learn more about each one via the links below…

–> Mechanic/sales – Splendid Cycles

–> Development Director for CF Cycle for Life – Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

–> Shipping Specialist – Velotech

[Read more…]

County: Morrison Bridge reopens this Sunday (10/22)

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Latest from Mult Co:

Morrison Bridge reopens Sunday, October 22

The Morrison Bridge will reopen to traffic no later than 6 a.m. on Sunday, October 22 as the replacement of the lift span deck nears completion.
Starting October 22, westbound traffic will again be able to access downtown from SE Morrison St. and SE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Access from the central eastside has been cut off since spring due to construction. The right westbound lane of the east approach ramp will become a right turn only lane to Interstate 5 north.

The bridge traffic alignment starting October 22 will include two westbound lanes, one eastbound lane, and open sidewalks on both sides of the bridge (including the multi-use path on the south side). All ramps will be open, except the ramp from southbound SW Naito Parkway to eastbound Morrison Bridge which remains closed until October 28. All six traffic lanes will reopen by October 30.

Effective October 22, the vehicle weight limit will be restored to a maximum of 40 tons, allowing TriMet’s 15-Belmont/NW 23rd bus route to resume service over the bridge for the first time in several years. The vehicle weight limit was reduced to 10 tons due to the deteriorated lift span deck that was replaced this year.

The vehicle speed limit on the bridge will increase from 25 miles per hour to 35 miles per hour in November, when construction is completed.
General contractor Hamilton Construction will demobilize equipment from the bridge during the week of October 23, which will require several lanes to be closed. Weather permitting, the contractor will close the bridge to all traffic on Friday, October 27 at 9 p.m. to apply a top overlay to the lift span deck. The bridge will reopen by 5 a.m. Monday, October 30. The epoxy overlay resembles asphalt and provides a better riding surface with good traction. In the event of rain, this work will be postponed until a later date.

After the Morrison Bridge returns to service, repair work will shift north to the Burnside Bridge. Hamilton Construction tentatively plans to close the bridge the weekend of November 17-19 to set up traffic control for a two-year project that will repair damaged concrete on the bridge deck, sidewalks and railings. Two of five lanes will be closed during the work and bikes and pedestrians will share a path on each side of the bridge.

For more information about the Morrison and Burnside bridge repairs, visit www.multco.us/bridges, or follow @MultcoBridges on Twitter.

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Weekend Event Guide: Freak Bike Fall, cyclocross, and some NOISE

Thursday, October 19th, 2017
Splash Dance Ride

Ridden by some, loved by all: It’s a freak bike weekend.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

The Weekend Event Guide is sponsored by Abus Bike Locks. Thanks Abus!

It. Is. Wet. Out. There.

Hope you’ve got your fenders and jackets all sorted out because the rain will be here for a while.

But it won’t be enough to deter our freak bike-loving friends from a weekend of fun and rides. And it will only embolden cyclocross fans for the upcoming mudfest that will transpire Sunday’s Crusade race at PIR.

Here’s our selection of the best events this weekend, starting with a neighborhood rally tomorrow (Friday) in St. Johns..
[Read more…]

Eagle Creek Fire/Historic Hwy update from ODOT

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Taken from 10/12 Historic Columbia River Highway newsletter:

Eagle Creek Fire Update

As of October 11, according to the Eagle Creek Fire Incident managers, the fire has burned 48,831 acres and is 50 percent contained.

Cooler temperatures and rain will help reduce the potential for significant fire activity. The uncontained portion of the fire is in steep, inaccessible terrain and fire managers do not anticipate the wildfire will spread in these areas.

Falling trees and rocks punched through wooden railings and decorative rail along the Historic Highway. Rocks of varying sizes slid down slopes and off of steep hillsides. In many places, the rocks and trees line that the road and those in the distance are charred and likely weakened.

The fire removed vegetation, underbrush and tree roots that support the Columbia Gorge. We expect to see land and rock slides with additional rain.

ODOT crews and hired contractors continue to remove trees in danger of falling into the roadway, scale slopes to remove debris and rocks, and inspect structures.

The Historic Highway will remain closed until hazards have been removed and it is safe to open.

The wood lining and portal timbers inside of the Oneonta Tunnel caught fire, and there are concerns about heat-related damage to the structural shotcrete under the wood. The bluffs on either side of the tunnel continue to drop rocks, and our engineers have been unable to safely determine any additional structural damage.

Once we are able to safely access the inside of the structure and determine what restoration is needed, we will determine the cost to rehabilitate the wood and any additional damage and pursue funding to restore the tunnel.

Thank you for continuing to stay off the Historic Columbia River Highway and State Trail, as well as all the trails closed due to the Eagle Creek Fire.

PBOT now has a manual for creating safer work zones

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Signage examples from the manual.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation has published its first-ever manual for temporary traffic control designs. Wonky words aside, this new guide is an important tool that could lead to safer cycling (and walking and driving) through work zones.

The guide has been endorsed by Portland’s City Traffic Engineer Lewis Wardrip and is aimed at designers, engineers, utility and maintenance workers, and even astute tactical urbanists (wink wink). Chapters include comprehensive lists of pertinent laws and city code/permitting requirements, recommended devices and products to get the job done, and how to train flaggers and traffic control measures. There are also of examples of safe work zones across a variety of roadway types and conditions — from one-way streets to bike lanes.

Section 6.6 of the guide (starts on page 50) is devoted to “Bicycle Accomodations”. The over-arching rule described in the manual is essentially “do no harm.” “When an existing bicycle lane or path is disrupted or closed,” it states, “a temporary bicycle facility should include the features and characteristics present in the existing facility.”

Here’s an excerpt from that section:[Read more…]

In two separate events, north Portlanders will seek attention for dangerous streets

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Flyer for tomorrow’s rally.

North Portlanders are tired of waiting for the City or advocacy groups to save them from the deadly streets in their front yards. They’re taking matters into their own hands by elevating voices of vulnerable road users and demanding attention for their concerns.

Two events in the coming week — one from the Arbor Lodge and Overlook neighborhood associations and one from the St. Johns Neighborhood Association — will focus on dangerous streets where motor vehicle users cause daily environmental, safety and public health problems.

This Friday (10/20) a group of St. Johns residents calling themselves Citizens for a Safe and Attractive Fessenden/St Louis will hold a rally to demand that the Portland Bureau of Transportation follow through with promises. Fessenden/St.Louis is a neighborhood collector street between Columbia Boulevard (to the north) and Lombard (to the south). Residents PBOT to fully implement the St. Johns Truck Strategy Phase II project that was approved after a 17 month public process in 2013 (as part of the St. Johns Truck Strategy adopted by City Council in 2001).
[Read more…]

TriMet eyes ‘bicycle slowing measures’ for Division Transit Project stations

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017

The bikeway will go through newly designed transit stations on Division, and that’s raising safety concerns about speedy cycling.

As we reported earlier this month, TriMet is firming up designs for the 41 new stations they’ll build as part the Division Transit Project — a $175 million plan to improve bus service between the downtown transit mall and Mt. Hood Community College. (It started as a bus rapid transit project but has since morphed into just better bus service.)

At last night’s joint meeting of Portland’s bicycle and pedestrian advisory committees in City Hall, TriMet planners shared even more recent and detailed station designs. They specifically wanted feedback on their “island stations,” where the bikeway (slated to be relatively robust and protected for the length of this project) runs directly adjacent to the bus stops. These island stations are “floating” in the roadway and separated from the sidewalk by the bikeway (see images).

TriMet is looking for “approaches to bicycle slowing” and they want feedback on “bicycle slowing measures” to potentially implement around these stations. The concern is that bicycle riders will come from the six-foot (plus buffer) bikeway and will enter the station areas too quickly and imperil people who are using the bus or otherwise walking in these crowded areas. One slide in their presentation listed a challenge of island stations as: “Requires added design applications to create safe environment for pedestrians and bicyclists.”[Read more…]

No more bike racks! Car2go phasing out Smart cars in favor of larger vehicle

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017

(Photo: Car2go)

Those cute blue and white cars that have become nearly ubiquitous on the streets of Portland in recent years are going away. Car2go, a carsharing company with 54,000 members in Portland, announced today they will phase out their compact, 2-seater Smart cars in favor of a larger vehicle.

The news is being received with some jeers from the many users of the service who liked not just the small size of the Smart cars but the fact that they came with a bike rack. A 2015 survey from the company found that sixty-eight percent of their Portland customers biked at least once per week, and 37 percent biked five to seven times a week. 76 percent of survey-takers said they wanted bike racks the local fleet.
[Read more…]

Rob Sadowsky, formerly of The Street Trust, is now executive director of Bark

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017
Historic Columbia River Hwy Centennial Celebration-26.jpg

Sadowsky in June 2016.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Rob Sadowsky is the new executive director of Bark, a Portland-based nonprofit that works to protect and conserve the Mt. Hood National Forest.

It’s an interesting position for Sadowsky. While Bark supports some types mountain biking, they are co-plaintiffs (with Sierra Club) on a lawsuit to halt construction of the Timberline Mountain Bike Park (more on that below).

Many of you know Sadowsky for his work with The Street Trust (formerly the Bicycle Transportation Alliance), where he was executive director from 2010 until being fired by the board of directors back in January.

Bark was founded in 1993 and currently has eight staffers and an email list that goes out to around 30,000 people (they are not a membership-based organization).

As I mentioned above, Bark is fighting a plan by Timberline Lodge to create a lift-assisted mountain biking resort on Mt. Hood. In 2013 we published an op-ed in opposition to the project from Bark board member Amy Harwood. Final oral arguments on the lawsuit were just heard on Monday (it was Sadowsky’s first day on the job and he was in the courtroom) and a decision is expected within the next month or so.

Asked about his opinion on mountain biking on National Forest land in a FAQ just posted to Bark’s website, Sadowsky didn’t mention Timberline:
[Read more…]

Brian Duncan, paralyzed in north Portland collision last year, is missing

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

Brian Duncan.
(Photo: Portland Police Bureau)

Portland Police are looking for Brian Duncan, whose family says he’s been missing since yesterday (10/16) at 2:30 pm. He was last seen on his motorized wheelchair near the Duckworth Dock on the floating portion of the Eastbank Esplanade south of the Steel Bridge.
[Read more…]