About Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus is the publisher and editor-in-chief of BikePortland.org.

You can reach him via email at jonathan [at] bikeportland [dot] org. If you have an urgent matter, please use our 24HR Tipline - (503) 706-8804.


Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) Posts

Wonk Night zeroes in on bike parking code update

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

Advocate Betsy Reese (L) and Bike Loud PDX Co-chair Emily Guise know that parking policy can be fun!
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

This post is part of a contractual partnership between BikePortland and Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Last night we hosted a special Wonk Night event to bolster the City of Portland’s bicycle parking code update project.

As we shared last week, the bike parking chapter of the Zoning Code (33.266.200) was written in 1996. That means it doesn’t address today’s volume of riders, the types of bikes people ride, or best practices for the design, security, and location of bike parking. And it’s certainly not strong enough to handle projected growth — in terms of our bicycle ridership goals or the population overall.

That’s a problem.

If people don’t have an accessible and secure place to park their bikes, they’ll be less likely to ride. And for those who don’t bike yet, seeing bikes neatly lined up at high-quality parking spaces can be an inspirational nudge toward giving it a try.
[Read more…]

Job: Mechanic – Community Cycling Center

Monday, September 24th, 2018

Job Title

Mechanic

Company / Organization

Community Cycling Center

Job Description

Organizational Overview

We love Portland and bikes. So we put our two loves together over 20 years ago, creating a nonprofit organization on a mission to broaden access to bicycling and its benefits.

Our vision is to help build a vibrant community where people of all backgrounds use bicycles to stay healthy and connected. We believe that all Portlanders—regardless of income or background—should have the opportunity to experience the joy, freedom, and health benefits of bicycling. This is the motivation behind everything we do.

In addition to delivering dynamic programs that benefit underserved communities, we operate a full-service bike shop in NE Portland that is staffed by highly experienced mechanics from diverse cycling backgrounds. Combined, our programs and shop services help riders build their skills and confidence; empower young people to ride to school and adults to ride to work; offer educational opportunities for teens to earn school credit; and support everyone in riding for health and recreation. We also collaborate with numerous community partners to generate pathways to employment and engagement within the growing bicycle movement by training new educators, leaders, advocates and mechanics.

Our goal is to help create a healthy, sustainable Portland for all community members.

General Position Summary

The Bicycle Mechanic is responsible for supporting the mission of the Community Cycling Center. This includes assessing, repairing, and refurbishing bicycles, assisting customers with choosing parts and accessories, as well as supporting our programs team. Under the supervision of the shop management team, the Bicycle Mechanic will work to consistently and efficiently deliver on the demands presented by our customers and programming efforts. This position will require technical proficiency, attention to detail, the ability to multitask, and to act as an ambassador for the Community Cycling Center.

Responsibilities

Assess and repair bicycles for customers; repair bicycles for retail sale and for use in our programs
Educate customers about the operation and maintenance of bicycles; assist with the purchase of bikes, parts, and accessories
Contribute to the retail environment–answer phones, restock shelves, and maintain a safe, clean, and organized work space
Work cooperatively with the rest of the team to meet the goals set forth by the shop management team
Moving and lifting bicycles up to 50 lbs. is a regular part of this job; however, reasonable accommodation can be made
Support fundraising efforts. This is an essential part of everyone’s job
Be a public supporter of the Community Cycling Center and represent the organization with positivity and consistency

Qualifications & Characteristics

Required

Ideal candidate has 5+ years of experience working in a high volume bike shop
Consistent attention to quality and detail
Ability to meet quantitative production and service goals as outlined by shop management
Effective communication
Ability to work in a collaborative environment
Commitment to and respect for equity, sustainability, and diversity

Preferred

Proficiency in Spanish
Familiarity with Lightspeed POS
Proficiency in ASL

How to Apply

Send your resume, cover letter, and (3) references to Jobs@CommunityCyclingCenter.org. Please put “Bicycle Mechanic” in the subject line. No phone calls, please.

The Community Cycling Center is an equal opportunity employer and strongly values diversity, equity and inclusion. Individuals with diverse backgrounds, abilities and experiences are encouraged to apply.

Comment of the Week: E-assist boosterism will be Biketown’s demise

Monday, September 24th, 2018

Our post last week about new keypads coming to the Biketown fleet led to a discussion about the future of the orange bikes.

Commenter John Liu sounded an alarm. He said this website and “other cheerleaders of dockless and e-sharebikes” will shoulder the blame if Biketown ends up in the scrap heap. Here’s his comment:[Read more…]

The Monday Roundup: Fast women, Vision Zero progress, Trump’s tariffs, and more

Monday, September 24th, 2018

This week’s Roundup is sponsored by NW Connector, Oregon’s public transit service that can get you and your gear from Portland to the coast and far beyond.

Welcome to the week. Here are the most noteworthy items we came across in the past seven days…

Build bikes like cars: I agree with this post from Bike Shop Girl where they say in order to normalize cycling in the U.S. we first need companies to offer more normal bikes that work well for everyday errands and utility.

No cheating needed: Volkswagen, the German carmaker whose CEO was arrested after they cheated on emissions tests a few years ago has debuted a new e-cargo bike they say is the, “solution for the mobility challenges of tomorrow.”

Noble’s dream race: American Ellen Noble battled Dutch legend Marianne Vos all the way till the end and finished second at the Cyclocross World Cup season opener in Waterloo, Wisconsin yesterday.

Vision Zero varies: After a carfree street idea in London was shelved, The Guardian took a look at how Vision Zero efforts have played out in several American cities.

Urban paradise: I need to take a trip to Pondevedra, a Spanish city that has banned cars.

Women and grand tours: CyclingNews has an in-depth piece on the physiology, economics and popular opinions behind the idea of creating pro cycling events that are as hard and as long for women as they are for men.

Advertisement

More on car bans: Air pollution could be the sleeper issue that changes the politics around car use in cities. It’s obvious that 1) air pollution is terrible and 2) cars are the main reason for it and 3) people love carfree spaces. Put them all together and what do you have?! More carfree cities. Just do it.

A woman did it: Denise Mueller-Korenek smashed the cycling world speed record that had stood since 1995 when she pedaled her bike an astonishing 183.9 mph.

Anti-bike hypocrisy: A woman running for mayor in Vancouver B.C. who has been outspoken against “lawless cyclists” failed to appear for a distracted driving ticket.

Blind spot: “Climate mayors” can’t stop fawning over electric-cars, even when safer and cheaper options are right in front of them.

WTH Seattle?: The public disagreements and lack of political will in Seattle has gotten so bad the city has hired a mediator to help move a project forward.

Trump’s tariffs: A trade war with China from the man who lives in the White House has cast storm clouds over much of the U.S. bike industry.

Perspective matters: Fascinating research into why people value road safety projects differently based on whether they see themselves as a “citizen” or a “driver”.

Thanks to everyone who sent in links!

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Opinion: Better Naito has ended in the worst way

Friday, September 21st, 2018

It’s gone. Ripped out last night — a full day before it was scheduled to be removed.

What’s one more day when we already got cheated out of a full week due to a conflict with a nearby bridge construction project?

It’s a lot.
[Read more…]

How not to do bike parking

Friday, September 21st, 2018

Looks OK from far away.
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Like some sort of riddle.

The other day I pulled up to an event at a Kaiser Permanente location in north Portland and was pleased to see a covered bike parking area. Then as I got closer all I could do was scratch my head.

As I pulled my bike in, I couldn’t figure how I was supposed to use it. The fact that a bike was locked awkwardly — as if someone had given up on it — was a red flag. There two different metal loops and a big ramp thing and none of it really seemed to fit together.

Another person was there with me (who happens to be one of the most senior leaders of the Portland Bureau of Transportation) said something like, “I think I’ve figured it out.” I looked over and he had rolled his front wheel up the ramp, which placed his bike fully under the canopy. That’s nice, I thought. But my bike has a very heavy and wide front end and there was no way I could do that.
[Read more…]

Weekend Event Guide: Harvest Century, Sunday Parkways, Ninkrossi, and more

Friday, September 21st, 2018

Get out and enjoy it.
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Quick housekeeping note: BikePortland relies on advertisers to survive. We have an opening to sponsor this Weekend Event Guide. It’s a golden opportunity! Please get in touch if interested.

Hasn’t this weather been amazing? The onset of crisp and colorful fall-like conditions have us dreaming about long days in the saddle. While we might see a spot of ran here and there on Saturday, there should be plenty of sun for the Harvest Century and Sunday Parkways.

Here’s our selection of things to do on a bike this weekend…

[Read more…]

It’s Park(ing) Day in Portland!

Friday, September 21st, 2018

Ping-pong is just one of many more interesting things we could do with our valuable curb space than park people’s cars.
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Official PBOT logo.

Despite what you’ve seen in the brochures or read about in the NY Times, the city of Portland is still overrun with cars. The socially awkward, poisonous, and dangerous personal transport vehicles take up the vast majority of our roadway space.

Park(ing) Day — which takes place today citywide — is a chance to ponder that tragedy and consider more sensible things to do with our public right-of-way.

The event is organized by Portland Bureau of Transportation. And while they can’t just directly throw shade at our unhealthy relationship with driving, it’s clear the event is intended to highlight our car abuse problem. According to official verbiage, the event, “Gives people the opportunity to re-envision how we use our public spaces… PBOT wants to encourage you to rethink how streets can be used.”

18 businesses and organizations have received permits to use the curb lane to install all sorts of cool stuff like small parks, art installations, lounge areas, and more. Find out if there’s one near your travels today. Here’s the map followed by a list of locations and descriptions:

.

North Portland

Art Parking (on N Denver St between N Schofield St & N Kilpatrick St): Art for All. Come create art and display your work on the display racks provided.

Northeast Portland

Don’t Park, PUTT!! (on NE Multnomah St between NE 7th Ave and 9th Ave) : It’s National Putt Putt day, come and try out our mini putt-putt course, enjoy snacks and get some swag! For pedestrians and cyclists. By Go Lloyd.

Northwest Portland

Burst Your Bubble (on NW 17th Ave between NW Lovejoy St and NW Kearney St): Come and enjoy a public bubble park for kids of all ages! By Opsis Architecture.

CRES-tober-Fest (on NW Marshall St between NW 14th Ave and NW 15th Ave): CRES-tober-Fest will be a fall celebration theme park complete with apple cider, corn-hole, giant Jenga, and pretzels. By Cambridge Real Estate Services.

Future Prairie Mobile Podcasting Studio (on NW 11th Ave between NW Couch St and NW Davis St): Join this mobile podcasting studio and enjoy some complimentary tea. By Future Prairie (artist collective).

Public Art Park (on NW 17th Ave between NW Northrup St and NW Overton St): Public Art Installation with all surfaces vibrantly painted with colors and patterns. By Swift.

Street Carnival (on NW 11th Ave between NW Marshall St and NW Lovejoy St): Come check out a StreetCar Cutout and get your picture taken. There will be a spinning wheel and lots of StreetCar swag to go around! By Portland StreetCar, Inc.

Urban Transformation (on NW Everett St between NW 10th Ave and NW 9th Ave): This parklet is a mini urban transect, more constructed on one end and more natural on the other. Sit or move through the space and leave thoughts and ideas on a wishing tree. By Sera Architects.

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Southeast Portland

Bikes & Coffee (on SE 52nd Ave between SE Tibbetts St and SE Franklin St): Coffee for cyclists (and anyone who like a good cuppa), as well as various bike tools and part on hand. By a Portland resident.

Connections: Reclaiming Streets and Revisiting Public Art (on SE Hawthorne Blvd between SE Grand Ave and SE 6th Ave): On the Multnomah County Building there are two bronze bas reliefs entitled Connections. Come and get a good look at these beautiful pieces of art! By Multnomah County.

Getting to Know You: Hey Neighbor! (on SE Hawthorne Blvd between SE 35th Ave and SE 35th Pl): Seating and games outside of Metro Boutique. Come and engage in an activity to learn more about your neighbors and neighborhood. By SE Uplift.

Making Connections for Fun (on SE 18th Ave between SE Ash St and SE Ankeny St): Bring your indoor plant out for a day in the sun and connect with your neighbors for a game of connect four or puzzle solving! By PlusQA.

Teddy Bear Picnic (on SE Alder St between SE 16th Ave and SE 15th Ave): Come and take a tea break with panda bears while surrounded by bamboo plants. By a Portland resident.

The Write On Letter Writing Lounge (on SE Division St between SE 32nd Ave and SE 33rd Ave): Pull up a chair, grab a pen and take time for some slow communication. This installation transforms a parking space into a letter writing salon! By Egg Press.

Neighborhood to the River (on SE Hawthorne Blvd between SE 40th Ave and SE 41st Ave): BES, Friends of Trees and New Seasons Market bring you the stream. Enjoy salmon, streams and trees and learn more about watershed health and stormwater management. By the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services.

Southwest Portland

Future of Transportation (on SW 2nd Ave between SW Taylor St and SW Yamhill St): An installation designed to provoke conversation about the future of transportation in Portland, including electric bikes, scooters and cars, rideshare and more. Enjoy trivia and prizes, a voting board and snacks while checking out an e-bike or scooter. By Forth Empowering Mobility.

What Will You Miss? (on SW Park Ave between SW Taylor St and SW Yamhill St): Sharing Mercy Corp’s vision that resilience is possible with climate change. What will you miss when we are further impacted by climate change? By Mercy Corps.

Skylab Installation (on SW 13th Ave between SW Burnside St and SW Washington St): Our PARK(ing) Installation seeks to give people a reason to take a break and pay more attention to their surroundings. Our unique ground surface will hopefully cause people to engage with the site and participate in thought provoking activities. By Skylab Architecture.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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New keypads (finally!) coming to Biketown bikes

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Snow, rain, spray paint: They’ve been through a lot.
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

The Oregonian reported Tuesday that about 450 new keypads are on their way to Biketown bikes in the coming months.

This will be music to the ears of many of you as we’ve heard numerous complaints about unresponsive keypads for months now. Unlike older kiosk-based systems, the “smart” Biketown bikes the keypads are built into the rear rack. Users must enter a PIN and/or a six-digit rental code to unlock a bike. With over two years of wear-and-tear, many of the keypads simply don’t work anymore. You press the button and either nothing happens or there’s a frustratingly long delay.

Just over a month ago, I ran into this problem when I tried to rent a bike to get home from downtown after a meeting. There weren’t many bikes available and I tried the keypads on two before I gave up. I eventually tracked down an e-scooter and got home.

The next morning I contacted Biketown’s operator Motivate Inc. and asked General Manager Dorothy Mitchell about the problem. Biketown Marketing Manager Tom Rousculp blamed the problem on their vendor, Jump Bikes (formerly Social Bicycles). He said they’d been, “experiencing connectivity issues, including a system-wide outage over the past week that resulted in a number of unresponsive bikes.”

Here’s more from The Oregonian: [Read more…]

After 20 years, Portland’s bike parking code set for major update

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Among the proposals are requirements for larger spaces (to fit cargo bikes) and outlets for e-bikes.
(Photo: PBOT)

1996 was a long time ago. I imagine some of you reading this weren’t even born yet. Did you know the City of Portland is using a bike parking code that was adopted way back then?

It’s true. Even though our bicycling rates have septupled since then and we have about 100,000 more residents, we’re still using a playbook that’s 20 years old. If we want to meet our goal of 25% bicycle mode split by 2030, we’ve got to bring our parking policies into the modern era. Thankfully, a major update is in the works.
[Read more…]