northwest portland

Safety advocates uneasy about striping bike lane across Steel Bridge onramp

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on July 8th, 2016 at 11:36 am

naito davis couch
New striping near the Steel Bridge at Naito will be done in the next few days.
(Image: Portland Bureau of Transportation)

Safety advocates are trying to balance enthusiasm for the city’s newly announced Naito bike lanes with concern over one key detail.

After nine years of delay, the plan to close the “Naito Gap” in the next few days drew joy from people like Reza Farhoodi, planning and transportation committee co-chair at the Pearl District Neighborhood Association and a member of the city’s Bicycle Advisory Committee. But Farhoodi said it would be a “terrible mistake” for the city not to use a right-turn arrow signal to protect bikes from right-turning autos as the bikes head north across the Steel Bridge onramp.


City weighs parking rule for NW that could block a fifth of new homes

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on July 5th, 2016 at 11:41 am

~1950 Pettygrove.
The Tess O’Brien Apartments on NW 19th and Pettygrove, built with no on-site parking, are the largest project that would have been illegal under a proposal going before city council tomorrow.
(Photo: Ted Timmons)

Portland’s City Council will meet Wednesday to consider a new mandatory parking requirement that, if it had existed for the last eight years, would have illegalized 23 percent of the new housing supply in northwest Portland during the period.

The Tess O’Brien Apartments, a 126-unit project that starts pre-leasing next week and will offer some of the cheapest new market-rate housing in northwest Portland, couldn’t have been built if they’d been required to have 42 on-site parking spaces, its developer said in an interview.

“Do the math,” Martin Kehoe of Portland LEEDS Living said Friday. “The apartments at the Tess O’Brien are between $1250 and $1400 a month. If we were required to build parking, you’d be between $1800 and $2000 a month. … It probably just wouldn’t have been built. And then what’s that going to do to the existing project that’s out there and has been built? It’s just going to drive the rents of those up.”


State will likely fund Flanders Crossing of 405, spurring thousands of bike trips in NW

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on June 15th, 2016 at 5:28 pm

flanders bridge span
The long-proposed span would connect downtown Portland and the Pearl District with the Northwest District.
(Photos: M. Andersen/BikePortland)

A new biking-walking bridge across Interstate 405 at Northwest Flanders has probably made the cut for funding, a state official said Wednesday.

The approximately 250-foot-long, 24-foot-wide bridge would become by far the most comfortable crossing of Interstate 405, an alternative to the existing crossings at Everett, Glisan and Couch. Paired with a proposed neighborhood greenway on Flanders from the Steel Bridge west to 24th Avenue, the span is expected to carry 9,100 trips per day.

That figure, which includes both biking and walking trips, is higher than the summertime bike counts across the Hawthorne Bridge and about five times the daily bike ridership so far on Tilikum Crossing.


Comment of the Week: The car-free destiny of NW 13th Avenue

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 27th, 2016 at 5:40 pm

Sunday Parkways NW-39
Northwest 13th Avenue during Sunday Parkways, 2011.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Curb-protected bike lanes are cool and all, but they’ve got nothing on building-protected bike lanes.

That’s roughly the position from BikePortland reader Andrew, who added the first comment to Tuesday’s post about possible downtown protected bike lanes with a very different vision for one of Portland’s most unique streets: Northwest 13th Avenue.

Here’s what Andrew had to say:


Problems riding on NW Lovejoy between 23rd-25th

by on May 17th, 2016 at 11:34 am

I’ve had 3 instances in the past month of drivers on NW Lovejoy between 23rd and 25th passing me (on bike) with a line of cars in front of me waiting on a light or stop sign. What gives? Is it the yellow dashes in the road where there should be a double-yellow line? Maybe there shouldn’t be a line at all.

In other parts of town, I’ve noticed that cars don’t often pass a bike that is moving at 20 MPH, however in NW Portland, cars seem to want to pass me no matter what speed I am travelling. Maybe this is part of the reason why biking in NW is much less popular than we would expect.

Why am I riding here? well the NW Marshall bike route ends at NW 22nd so anyone wanting to continue towards the west hills on Cornell Road would need to end up on Lovejoy eventually.

Thank you for helping us make NW Portland Week a success!

by on April 19th, 2016 at 1:15 pm

Get Together NW Portland Week-10.jpg
Some of the crowd at our Get Together on Friday.
(Photos J. Maus/BikePortland)

20 stories, hundreds of images and many new friends and discoveries made for a highly successful NW Portland Week. Thank you for reading and contributing (I think the comment threads were as interesting and valuable as our reporting). And a special thanks goes to our 250 subscribers. Their monthly payments are what make these special reporting projects possible.

So, what did we learn?

We learned that northwest Portland has more potential when it comes to bike access investments than any other part of the city. And if you think those investments would only target “the rich” you might want to read Michael’s excellent story that debunked that myth.

NW Portland’s best secret routes, hang-outs, and other cool things

by on April 15th, 2016 at 4:44 pm

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NW Cornell road just below Upper Macleay Park.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Part of NW Portland Week.

How often do you just bike around the city and take the time to slow down and see everything? Not just traffic or street signs but everything. These special weeks when we focus on one part of the city give us the opportunity to let a place soak in. Over the past five days I’ve discovered lots of cool stuff about northwest Portland (I hope you have too!). I’ve found new shortcuts I never knew existed, made a few new friends, and have gained a much deeper understanding of this beautiful, historic, and thriving part of our city.

Portland’s best model for population growth without catastrophe is right in front of us

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on April 15th, 2016 at 3:52 pm

2018 nw everett 1910 9-20

2018 NW Everett Street, built 1910.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Part of NW Portland Week.

Portland’s “huge population boom” and “explosive growth” have driven such a painful housing shortage that it’s not uncommon these days to hear Portlanders wish the city would stop creating so many jobs.

Since 2008, the city’s population growth rate has been about 9,000 net new residents per year, or 1.5 percent.

But when many of the buildings that continue to define northwest Portland were built, Portland’s population was growing by 7 percent every year for years on end. In the decade of the 1900s, the city that started at 90,000 residents added 11,679 new ones every year on average.


New Flanders Bridge or not, crossing I-405 is about to get easier

by on April 15th, 2016 at 2:16 pm

NW Portland Week - Day 5-10.jpg
NW Couch where it crosses I-405. Riding through here you must keep your head on a swivel and scoot quickly across three intersections (two of which have no traffic signal).
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Part of NW Portland Week.

Eight years ago, when former Mayor Sam Adams made his case to re-use the old Sauvie Island Bridge as a new crossing of I-405 at NW Flanders Street, one of his chief arguments was safety. Adams and Portland Bureau of Transportation staff convinced Portlanders that the nearby crossings at Burnside, Couch, Everett and Glisan, were inherently unsafe for bikers and walkers.

People on Bikes – NW Portland edition

by on April 15th, 2016 at 10:34 am

(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Part of NW Portland Week.

Here’s what cycling — and the people who do it — look like in northwest Portland. (more…)