With new ‘Livable Streets’ subgroup, BikeLoud will commemorate road deaths by all modes

by on July 30th, 2015 at 3:15 pm

livable streets fb
The Facebook page for the new “subgroup”
Livable Streets Action.

A new group called Livable Streets Action is taking the tactics that have won a string of victories for local biking this spring and summer and applying them to other modes, too.

Organizer Dan Kaufman, a videographer and longtime local social justice advocate who has helped organize demonstrations for transportation activism group BikeLoudPDX and the bike-based but non-transportation-focused group Bike Swarm, referred to Livable Streets Action as a “subgroup” of those other groups.

Livable Streets Action’s first event is tomorrow, a Friday afternoon commemoration for Marlene Popps, a woman who was hit by a car and left for dead on the evening of July 4 at the corner of SE 60th and Holgate. She died of her injuries July 21.


Comment of the Week: The case for organized running advocacy in Portland

by on April 10th, 2015 at 4:21 pm

I'm too clean-cut to be here in Portland with all these hippies. I think I should be in Kansas. Or maybe Salt Lake City.
Shared interests.
(Photo: Ed Yourdon)

Here on BikePortland, we love to switch focus around the many ways to enjoy bikes, from dirt-trails or the daily commute. And if you ask me, Jonathan’s inspired combination of sport, fun and policy is the special recipe that has made this site a viable business as well as a work of love for everyone involved.

So as reader Adam wrote this week, isn’t it time for someone to apply a similar approach to athleticism on foot?

Here’s what Adam wrote this afternoon beneath our post about the appeal of gravel paths to people running:


Cops cite 61 people in 4 hours at a single unmarked 82nd Ave crosswalk

by on April 7th, 2015 at 8:39 am

82nd cooper
The enforcement action was one of the few that the city has conducted at unmarked crosswalks.
(Image: Google Street View)

In Oregon and Washington as in many states, every corner is a legal crosswalk, and all vehicles are supposed to stop for someone trying to use it.

But good luck getting people to stop for you at corners like Southeast 82nd Avenue and Cooper Street.

A preannounced police enforcement action at the crosswalk on March 25 resulted in 61 citations and four warnings, the most ever issued during one of Portland’s periodic crosswalk enforcement events.


In sidewalkless Southwest, neighborhood greenways are made for walking

by on February 13th, 2015 at 1:52 am

A SW Illinois Street piggyback ride,
brought to you in part by speed bumps.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

This post is part of our SW Portland Week.

Part of Portland’s big idea of renaming “bike boulevards” as “neighborhood greenways” was that they’re not just bikeways; they’re spaces for street play, sports and other fun. And they’re also, the line goes, good for walking.

It’s easy to laugh that last part off on the east side of Portland, where almost every greenway is lined with sidewalks.

Not so in Southwest Portland, where neighborhood greenways are few but sidewalks are nearly as rare.


Five Walktober ambles worth checking out

by on October 8th, 2014 at 9:58 am

In the 2012 Situationist Walk, attendees concocted
bizarre rules to govern their own behavior as they
strolled through Southeast Portland.
(Photo: Oregon Walks)

Portland’s annual three-week festival of fun on foot, inspired by PedalPalooza, has its first big burst of action this Saturday.

Walktober is run by advocacy group Oregon Walks. Like PedalPalooza, anyone can create an event online; the most interesting will survive.

With lots of good contenders for people interested in exploring, learning more about the city or just sampling many kinds of beer without worrying about the bike home, we thought we’d pull a few highlights from this month’s calendar of walking events.


State’s $1.9 million gift says it: flashing beacons are the safety tool of the moment

by on April 24th, 2014 at 4:27 pm

An active warning beacon in North Portland.
(Photo: City of Portland)

Two state legislators’ announcement this week that $1.9 million from the state’s general fund would pay for new flashing beacons and traffic islands at 18 East Portland crosswalks communicated two things about Portland streets.

First: that street safety is one of State Rep. Shemia Fagan’s core issues, something she’s consistently putting political capital behind. Second: that rectangular rapid-flash beacons, which communicate a person’s desire to cross without using red lights to stop traffic completely, have become one of the city’s go-to safety tools.


Novick wants $1 million from general fund for beacons at 15 crosswalks

by on April 18th, 2014 at 12:51 pm

An active warning beacon in North Portland.
(Photo: City of Portland)

The City of Portland’s general fund has a few million dollars to spare, and Commissioner Steve Novick is mounting an unusual campaign to spend some of it on safer street crossings.

In a city where you’re twice as likely to die from traffic as from homicide, Novick and other backers say making roads safer is the most cost-effective way to improve public safety.

In an interview Friday, Novick called out a few police operations in particular as having lower returns on investment.

Time to hit the streets for ‘Walktober’

by on October 21st, 2013 at 12:00 pm

Have you heard about Walktober? It’s “Three weeks of fun on foot” and it’s in full swing right now. The event is organized by Oregon Walks and it was inspired by Shift’s bike-centric Pedalpalooza that happens each summer. Similar to Pedalpalooza, the event consists of several individual events created and led by community groups and individuals who add them to a master calendar. Last week there was a walk on the Eastbank Esplanade led by the man who planned the project, George Hudson. There was also the Get Annoyed walk led by our very own Michael Andersen which featured problem solving and cake.

We’ve heard about two events this week that look interesting, so we wanted to share them with you…

Wonk Walk 2013: Crosswalk Crusade! 5:15 pm TONIGHT (Meet on west side of SW 4th between Stark and Oak)
This walk will be led by Lancaster Engineering employees Kirk Paulsen and Brian Davis. Here’s how they describe the event: (more…)

Wear Oregon’s crosswalk law on your chest

by on October 9th, 2013 at 11:20 am

A shirt that’s also a traffic sign.
(Photo: Brian Davis)

Ever been frustrated when other road users don’t respect Oregon’s crosswalk laws? Now you can wear a helpful reminder on your chest thanks to a new t-shirt that will turn you into a walking traffic sign.

Our friends and neighbors at Lancaster Engineering (who are nice enough to rent part of their office to us) have stepped up to promote safe walking by offering t-shirts that have an official Oregon regulatory sign plastered across the front. The t-shirts are being offered by Lancaster to help raise money for Portland-based non-profit Oregon Walks (it also happens to be Walktober in case you didn’t know). (more…)

Steph Routh announces resignation from Oregon Walks

by on August 21st, 2013 at 9:20 am

Steph at Oregon Walks benefit-2-2
Steph Routh in November 2012.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Oregon Walks, a non-profit advocacy group that works to improve walking conditions around the state, has announced that Executive Director Steph Routh will resign in October.

Routh became the organization’s first full-time staffer when she was named to the position in May 2009. In the ensuing years, Routh helped transform Oregon Walks (formerly known as the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition) by making what was traditionally a quiet, behind-the-scenes organization into a public force to be reckoned with. Just months after taking the job, she asked the community to think hard about the state of walking advocacy in Oregon — a movement that has lacked the spark of and cultural identity evident in the local bicycle scene.

Routh’s personal dedication to the task, professional creativity, and natural charisma drew people to her organization and her cause.