With $50k grant, North Portland Greenway shifts from planning to organizing

by on February 4th, 2015 at 10:55 am

082008 npGREENWAY ride 116
Let’s get it built.
(Photo: npGreenway)

The 50-year-old vision of a continuous mixed-use path along the east bank of the Willamette River, connecting Kelley Point Park, on the tip of the St. Johns peninsula, to the Steel Bridge, has made it on all the planning maps.

Now, the little nonprofit that has brought the concept this far is preparing for the last stage: getting it on the ground.


After a decade of less driving, federal forecast shifts to match reality

by on January 7th, 2015 at 4:18 pm

Existing conditions on Williams Ave-8-7
Get the picture, Uncle Sam?
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

A forecast that has been buried deep inside the U.S. Department of Transportation website since last May seems to be the first to fully acknowledge that economic growth no longer seems closely tied to driving.


Off-road biking supporters pack Metro meeting on Tualatin Mtns project

by on December 3rd, 2014 at 11:38 am

N Tualatin Mtns open house-7
“How many of you are from the cycling community?”
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Any doubt that there is vast pent-up demand for more single track mountain bike trails in Portland vanished last night when a sea of supporters swamped a Metro meeting on the North Tualatin Mountains project.

Metro and TriMet introduce bus rapid transit for Powell-Division corridor

by on December 2nd, 2014 at 12:54 pm

Room for bikes?
(Image: From a Metro slide presentation)

Only in Portland would a regional planning agency host a lunchtime event titled “Bus Rapid Transit 101” in a movie theater with free popcorn.

That was the setting yesterday for a meeting hosted by Metro to introduce Portlanders to their Powell-Division Transit Development Project. The planning effort is just getting started and the aim is to create the region’s first bus rapid transit (BRT) service on a 15-mile route along SE Powell and Division streets between Portland and Gresham.

After years of disappointment, single track lovers have reasons for optimism

by on November 21st, 2014 at 12:21 pm

Newton Rd in Forest Park

With renewed energy from Portland’s off-road biking advocates and a Metro project that could open up 1,300 acress of trail possibilities, 2015 could be a very big year for advocates itching for more local single track trails.

As we reported yesterday, local advocacy and trail building group the Northwest Trail Alliance has thrown down a gauntlet of sorts by launching an online petition in the form of an open letter to members of Portland City Council. The petition urges them to “catch up with the overflowing demand for off-road cycling opportunities.” By the time this story is published there will likely be close to 1,000 signatures collected in its first two days.


Metro weighs anti-climate-change efforts against Clackamas County complaints

by on November 13th, 2014 at 12:10 pm

Clackamas County Commissioner
John Ludlow.
(Photos: Clackamas County)

As Chinese and U.S. leaders have been negotiating the first-ever bilateral deal to cut carbon pollution in both countries, some local government leaders have been calling for Americans to give up on carbon-reduction efforts.

Their argument: because they think China and other countries are unlikely to reduce their carbon emissions, Americans shouldn’t try to reduce theirs.

The fight matters to transportation because it’s playing out in the Metro regional government’s Climate Smart Communities Scenarios Project, which will influence the amount of money available to spend on new roads, freeways, transit lines and off-street paths over the next 25 years.

John Ludlow, chair of the Clackamas County Commissioners, has been one of the loudest voices for more roadway spending.

“When they continue to pour in money to bike paths they take it away from roadways,” he told the Portland Tribune for an article this week. “Freight can’t use a bike path.”


Clackamas County wants Metro to fight climate change by widening roads

by on October 30th, 2014 at 8:32 am

traffic on i-5 -1
Climate change in action — or inaction, depending on your point-of-view.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

This morning, Clackamas County’s commissioners are considering whether to urge the Portland region to attempt to fight climate change by adding more lanes to its freeways. (more…)

A region can dream: The metro area’s vision for its future path network

by on October 23rd, 2014 at 9:30 am

regional map
(Click the image to enlarge, or see this zoomable PDF or web version.)

When you stitch together the long-term bike plans of every city in the area, connect a few dots and put it all on one map, you get something pretty spectacular.


Five surprises in a comparison of Portland and Dutch travel choices

by on October 21st, 2014 at 2:35 pm

split screen rotterdam
Portlanders and Rotterdammers have more in common than you might think.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Most city-to-city transportation comparisons are very simple: 64 percent of trips by car, 11 percent by bike, and so on.

But those broad numbers are really just blankets that have been thrown over the intricate topography of transportation choices that’s actually at work in our daily lives. To really understand how cities work, you also have to look at a second factor: How far are people going?

A motherlode of newly released data has revealed those patterns for Portlanders for the first time.


Five smart things our regional planning agency is doing to fight climate change

by on October 3rd, 2014 at 9:47 am

A parking lot in downtown Portland. Metro’s ‘Climate Smart’ plan
connects parking and climate policy.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Because its role in shaping transportation happens mostly behind the scenes, it’s sometimes easy to think that Metro is dedicated entirely to the distribution of nostrums.

But the truth is that Metro, the only directly elected regional government in the country, is a major force behind Portland’s success as a city. In much of the United States, the metropolitan planning organization — Metro’s peer — is the belly of the beast. These are the bodies that generate the obviously ridiculous traffic projections that are used to justify freeway construction and spend their federal Clean Air Act allowances on new turn lanes that supposedly reduce congestion but actually accelerate sprawl.