TREC at PSU

Interviews reveal transportation impacts of Albina displacement

Avatar by on August 21st, 2020 at 1:55 pm

Biking on 122nd Ave in east Portland.
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

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Portland State researcher seeks subjects for first of its kind electric bike study

Avatar by on March 13th, 2020 at 3:31 pm

(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

“E-bikes are the future!” That’s what Portland mayoral candidate Sarah Iannarone proclaimed at a forum earlier this week. Iannarone is bullish on e-bikes not just because she’s an expert on innovative transportation solutions (thanks in part to her work at First Stop Portland), but because she rides an e-bike herself.

Many that ride e-bikes quickly become evangelists like Iannarone and start using words like “transformational” and “revolution”.

Now a Portland State University research project wants to add more science to back up all the excitement. And they’re looking for subjects. [Read more…]

Want bikeways for everyone? Nix the mixing, new research says

Avatar by on December 19th, 2019 at 2:45 pm

This protected intersection in Salt Lake City, Utah was rated comfortable by the largest number of respondents.
(Photo: TREC at PSU Researchers)

With protected bike lanes all the rage in Portland and throughout the U.S., a big question remains: What about intersections? After all, protection on the blockface doesn’t mean much when you come face-to-face with a drivers’ car at the intersection.[Read more…]

Blue light for bike riders part of detection research project

Avatar by on October 11th, 2019 at 12:39 pm

See the new sign and blue light in upper right.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

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Better Block’s ‘Project Pathway’ program now formally integrated into PSU curriculum

Guest Contributor by on May 31st, 2019 at 6:54 am

The plaza on SW 3rd (left) and Better Naito are Better Block’s biggest successes. (Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

This story was written by Malia Knapp-Rossi, a Master of Urban and Regional Planning candidate at Portland State University and intern with Better Block PDX.

Better Block PDX is excited to announce that Portland State University’s Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC) has adopted the Project Pathway program.
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BikePortland is at TRB thanks to TREC at PSU

Avatar by on January 14th, 2019 at 12:27 pm

These stickers (modeled by Portland State University’s Michael Espinoza) are a hot commodity at the conference.
(Photo: @TRECPdx on Instagram)


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Portland State wins $75,000 grant to study bike share equity programs

Avatar by on March 1st, 2018 at 4:56 pm

(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

You can add another bike-related topic that researchers at Portland State University have gained national notoriety for: equity in bike share systems.

PSU’s Transportation Research and Education Consortium (TREC) just won a grant worth nearly $75,000 from the Better Bike Share Partnership. The award, announced today by People for Bikes, is part of $410,000 split between eight projects across the country.

The money will go toward a “national assessment of bike share equity programs.” Here’s more about the project:

Portland State’s research team will document the programs and strategies developed to address equity in bike share across the U.S., and identify the definitions and measures of success for each of these efforts. The result will be a catalog of equity approaches employed, an aggregated summary of key elements of each approach or strategy, and a record of which metrics agencies used to assess if they are meeting their equity goals, along with the various ways agencies are assessing their programs.

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Beyond cars: City Council votes for ‘person trips’ to make better planning decisions

Avatar by on December 14th, 2016 at 1:00 pm

New signals on NW Couch-7.jpg

A more humane way to plan.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

When it comes to planning a city, trips matter. Estimates about the amount of trips generated by a transportation project or new development are what dictate not just what our redesigned streets will look like, but also how we pay for them.

One of the ways the City of Portland pays for infrastructure is by charging developers a fee based on the impact their new building will have on the transportation system. These fees — known as Transportation System Development Charges, or just TSDCs for short — are based on a model that estimates how many trips a new development will generate.

There’s just one small problem: The methodology is centered almost exclusively around cars. The Portland Bureau of Transportation wants to change that.

At City Council today commissioners unanimously passed an ordinance (PDF) allowing PBOT to use a methodology that uses “person trips” – meaning trips made not just by people in cars and trucks but also foot, by bike and in transit vehicles.
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Reform school: PSU will host a free ‘Summer Transportation Institute’ for girls

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 25th, 2016 at 3:29 pm

Sunday-Parkways-SE-2012-3

It’ll be an introduction to transportation careers.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

If you’re a female high schooler with a yen for understanding how cities work and how to help them evolve, Portland State Unviersity has a deal for you.

PSU’s Transportation Research and Education Center is offering its first-ever Summer Transportation Institute, a two-week course designed to introduce young women (rising into grades 9-12) to the possibilities of a career in shaping streets. It’ll be divided between (a) guest lectures from prominent women in Portland’s transportation world and (b) “field tours of Portland’s transportation infrastructure and public spaces.”

Here’s how the course description puts it:

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Even in suburban Oregon, drive-alone trips are a shrinking share of new commutes

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 17th, 2016 at 12:56 pm

Beaverton to Tualatin ride-2

Bike commuter Jim Parsons in Washington County.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

The Portland metro area seems to have already discovered how to slow the growth of traffic congestion, the city’s bicycle planning coordinator said Friday. But it’s not investing in it very quickly.

Between 2000 and 2014, the three Oregon counties in the metro area added 122,000 new commuters. And inside the Metro urban growth boundary, less than half of that net growth came from people driving alone in cars.

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