‘MAMIL’ (Middle Aged Men in Lycra) documentary coming to Portland

Official poster.

I can’t believe someone made a documentary out of this. But I’m happy they did.

MAMIL’s are the oft-ridiculed cycling world sub-culture characterized by men in bright-and-tight lycra who speed around in packs chasing Strava segments and trying to recapture their glory days. Now their story has been told in a feature documentary, MAMIL, that will screen one night only in Portland. The screening is organized by Demand Film, a “cinema on demand” service that is showing MAMIL on 300 theaters across the country on the same night: February 21st. You can see it in the Portland area at: Regal Fox Tower Stadium 6, Regal Lloyd Center 10, and Regal Hilltop 9 Cinema (Oregon City).

The film is narrated by legendary Tour de France commentator Phil Liggett. Here’s the official blurb:

“MAMIL captures on film the spirit and the members of a movement that is growing throughout the world — middle-aged men taking to their cycles and biking through mountains, city streets, you name it, all in the name of CYCLING. Some do it for health, some for love, others just to clear their heads and face the world. And despite all the crashes, mega-pricey carbon fiber cycles, and wives worrying that they’ve been replaced by two wheels and a $1,200 bicycle seat, these guys wouldn’t have it any other way.

Filmed in the U.S., Australia and the U.K., MAMIL is a celebration of the love that can finally be shared – that of man for bike. You might be in an LGBT cycling club in New York or Christian in the Midwest; you might be a lawyer or a cancer survivor, you might be hauling your middle-aged belly over the next hill, or speeding along the open road, but you still thrill to the meditation of the bike.”

Here’s the official trailer:

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Portland filmmaker raising money to shoot Cyclocross Nationals on ‘Super 8’ film

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Drew Coleman in a still from his GoFundMe campaign video. Watch it below.

Sellwood neighborhood resident Drew Coleman has a vision for his next project. But he needs a bit of help to realize it.

Coleman is a filmmaker who started shooting local cyclocross races this summer. He’s also started a YouTube channel under the Local Cycling Network banner. Now he wants to cover the biggest race of the year: the Cyclocross National Championships which take place in Reno, Nevada next weekend. This time around he wants to do try something new: Coleman wants to shoot the race and the culture that surrounds it, on film. He’s bought a 1983 Canon 814 xl-s camera and he’s looking for support to buy the film which runs about $1.53 per second.

He’s launched a GoFundMe campaign and hopes to raise $2,500 for the trip and the film.

Here’s more from Drew about the project:

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Oregon Walks to screen new Jane Jacobs doc at annual meeting

On May 4th, urban planning giant Jane Jacobs would have been 101 years old. To mark her birthday, Portland-based Oregon Walks will host a screening of a new documentary about her life. The event is also the organization’s annual membership meeting and will also include a panel discussion with three women who are “following in Jane Jacobs’ footsteps.”

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‘Inspired to Ride’ film to premiere in Portland April 18th

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

Nathan Jones from Ride Yr Bike is hosting the Portland premiere of Inspired to Ride, a film about endurance cycling. The big event is at McMenamins Mission Theater (NW 16th and Glisan) on Saturday April 18th and the film’s cast and crew — as well as endurance racing legends Mike Hall and Juliana Buhring — will be in attendance.

On June 7, 2014, forty-five cyclists from around the world set out on the inaugural Trans Am Bike Race, following the famed TransAmerica Trail. Their mission is to cover 4,233 miles in one enormous stage race, traversing through ten states in a transcontinental adventure of epic proportions.

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Robin Moore: From viral star “MC SpandX” to anti-coal crusader

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Robin Moore.
(Photo: Aaron Araki)

28-year former Portland resident Robin Moore burst onto the bike world with his role as MC SpandX in the hilarious spoof rap video “Performance“. The video was shot entirely in Portland and when it debuted in 2009 it became a viral hit. So far it has nearly 2.3 million views on YouTube. After Performance, Moore went on to create “Get Dirty“, “Le Velo” and he scored a few cameos in BikeSnobNYC videos.

Today, Moore is the co-founder of +M Productions and has focused his considerable filmmaking talent onto something much more serious that spandex jokes; an documentary titled “Momenta” which exposes the dangers of proposed coal train exports in the Pacific Northwest. Moore dropped us a line last week and we emailed him a few questions to learn more about his project.

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Craigslist post about post-dooring romance inspires film

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Still from Mike Vogel’s Doored.

Remember that awesome Craigslist post last summer when a guy got doored while biking downtown, but instead of being angry at the door-operener he sort of… fell in love?

Well it turns out that Craigslist post was the inspiration one of my favorite movies from the Filmed By Bike festival that wrapped up Tuesday night. Portland-based writer/director Mike Vogel of Front Ave Productions created his short film, Doored – Fractured Skull, Broken Hearts, based on that Craigslist post and it made its debut at the festival.

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‘Circle Century’ documents 660 lap, 100-mile ride around Ladd Circle

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Still from Circle Century.

Southeast Portland resident and hobbyist movie maker Merritt Raitt debuted a new film at Filmed by Bike over the weekend. Circle Century documents his attempt to ride 100 miles, non-stop around Ladd Circle.

Raitt, who lives just a few houses down from the circle, accomplished his feat back in August 2011 but his movie has just now been released to the public. I followed up with Merritt to ask him a bit more about what it was like to ride a 0.15 mile loop of a neighborhood street 660 times without any breaks.

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