world day of remembrance for road traffic victims

Opinion: We’ll never have safe streets if we continue to make safe choices

Avatar by on November 13th, 2020 at 10:26 am

Traffic victims were represented by empty pairs of shoes at a 2016 World Day of Remembrance event in Portland.
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Late Thursday night someone died while using 122nd Avenue. They were the 46th person whose life ended while traveling on a Portland road so far this year, putting us on the same grim pace as 2019 despite a major reduction in travel due to the pandemic.

There have been four fatal crashes in a one mile stretch of 122nd Avenue in the past year alone. In 2018 I attended a press conference marking the completion of new crossings and other updates to the notoriously deadly street. Standing just one block from one of this year’s deaths, Portland Bureau of Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, PBOT Director Chris Warner, and other transportation bigwigs gave glowing speeches about their dedication to Vision Zero. Eudaly said the recent changes they made were an example of “transportation done right” and how she wasn’t willing to accept the constant carnage on 122nd. [Read more…]

Grieving moms make traffic deaths real as Portland proclaims ‘Day of Remembrance’

Avatar by on November 13th, 2019 at 1:17 pm

Group photo after proclamation was read at Portland City Council this morning.
Left to right: Commissioners Jo Ann Hardesty and Chloe Eudaly; Oregon/SW Washington Families for Safe Streets volunteers Michelle DuBarry, Darla Sturdy, Kim Stone, and David Sale; Commissioner Nick Fish; Mayor Ted Wheeler.

Mayor Ted Wheeler announced at today’s City Council meeting that Portland will join a global movement by marking November 17th as World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. [Read more…]

Press release: Families and Loved Ones Honor Memories of Road Traffic Victims

Avatar by on November 17th, 2017 at 12:06 pm

From The Street Trust:

Families and Loved Ones Honor Memories of Road Traffic Victims

PORTLAND, OR — Dozens of community members will gather at the Rosewood Initiative in Southeast Portland on Sunday to commemorate the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims and honor the memories of friends and loved ones who died as a result of road crashes.

Participants will gather at 12:00 p.m. and take a silent walk of solidarity with road traffic victims’ loved ones and families. Community members who have lost family members to road traffic will give brief remarks and the Rosewood Initiative will feature an art exhibit to raise awareness of the human toll of road crashes. This event is organized by a coalition of organizations including The Street Trust, Families For Safe Streets, and the Rosewood Initiative.

“Nearly 500 people died last year on Oregon roads,” said The Street Trust’s deputy director LeeAnne Fergason, “and it’s critical for those lives to be remembered. We believe that zero deaths and injuries on our streets is possible through initiatives like Vision Zero education and policies, reduced speed postings, and street safety projects. We will have to advocate to make sure Vision Zero becomes a reality.”

Vision Zero is the concept that one death on our streets is too many. According to the City of Portland, Portland families deserve safe streets on which to walk, bike, operate mobility devices, access transit, and drive. The Portland Bureau of Transportation aims to make our transportation system the safest possible and to move toward zero traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries in the next ten years.

“My son was killed on a crosswalk by light rail,” explains Darla Sturdy, ” I joined Families for Safe Streets to push for safe streets so that mothers will not have to go through what I have, and yet another person was killed this month. Join us on Sunday to remember our loved ones and fight for Vision Zero.”

Every member of Families for Safe Streets has a story like Darla’s. They are a group of mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, grandparents, and siblings marching to end traffic violence and take another step towards achieving Vision Zero in Oregon and SW Washington during this year’s World Day of Remembrance event on November 19th.

As traffic deaths spike, ‘Remembrance Day’ reminds us of human toll

Avatar by on November 21st, 2016 at 2:26 pm

Despite all the technology; despite all the vigils; despite all the “safety campaigns”; despite all the promises from road agencies and elected officials that “safety is our number one priority” — people continue to die at an alarming rate while using Oregon roads.

To help stem this tragic tide, a small but dedicated group of bereaved family members wants us all to feel their pain — and then use those feelings to change ourselves and our streets. That was the goal of World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, which was observed yesterday in Portland’s Waterfront Park.
[Read more…]

400+ pairs of shoes needed to mark Oregon deaths this year on ‘World Day of Remembrance’

Avatar by on November 3rd, 2016 at 9:44 am

A pair of shoes for every Oregonian who died while using our roads in 2016. So far.

A pair of shoes for every Oregonian who died while using our roads in 2016. So far.

Each pair of shoes in that image above represents just one of the 405 precious lives lost on Oregon roads so far this year. We are on pace for yet another grisly record locally and across the state as our collective efforts to make road use safer continues to be outpaced by the growth of the threat.
[Read more…]

‘Families for Safe Streets’ to launch Sunday on national day of remembrance

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on November 12th, 2015 at 4:01 pm

Powell protest ride-55.jpg

Kristi Finney at a protest on Powell Blvd in May.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

A new organization for people whose lives have been changed by traffic violence will hold its first public event this weekend.

As part of the World Day of Rememberance for Road Traffic Victims, members and supporters of Oregon and Southwest Washington Families for Safe Streets will meet noon Sunday at 1805 NE 2nd Ave. in Portland, the headquarters of Oregon Walks and the Community Cycling Center. Anyone is welcome.

From there, they’ll meet for fellowship and then break into carpools and bike trains “to place memorials at crash sites along high crash corridors to build awareness and honor those who’ve died.” The group hosted an event this week where volunteers cut out cardboard in the shape of humans.
[Read more…]