BikeVancouver
Welcome to our coverage of Vancouver, Washington and Clark County. Browse the stories below and click the headlines to read the full stories. If you have tips or feedback, please contact us.

Burnt Bridge Nature Trail

Saturday, September 25th, 2021

Length: 16 miles
Pace: 12mph
Terrain: Moderate
Elevation: 750 feet
Ride Type: Group
Cancellation Guidelines: nothing – we’re rolling!

Details:
If you like to avoid cars as much as possible while biking then this paved nature trail is the ride for you! Ever wonder how this trail connects from 92nd Ave all the way to Fruit Valley Rd? Follow us! This route follows Burnt Bridge Creek and beyond through a variety of landscapes, including open grasslands, wetlands, and forests.
This route does have a few short moderate to significant hills with a total elevation gain of 750 ft for the total ride. We’ll regroup at the tops of hills.
We start at NE 92nd (see the location noted below). 
East on Burton, Right on 90th, turns into 92nd, right on 19th Street.
REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.  Contact me if you have any difficulty.  Our registration collects your waiver signature AND emergency contact information.  Important!
Please arrive 15 minutes early to be part of the announcements and safety briefing.
Bring a bike in good working order (pump up those tires), wear your helmet (REQUIRED), and tuck in some water and a tube that fits your wheel.
The published pace is 12mph (social pace). This is the maximum speed of the ride; a rider should be able to sustain this speed on flat terrain with no wind.
This is a group ride meaning that riders stay together at the published pace for the entire ride; we will regroup at tops of hills if needed.
Lights are great to have on your bike. Bells are great for notifying pedestrians or cyclists that you’re passing, but “On your left!” works just as well.
Check out the route/cue sheet here.

Notes:
Please arrive 15 minutes early to be a part of the announcements and safety briefing. Riders are expected to have read the Safe Riding Policy and be familiar with the Ride Style Definitions. Please direct questions to the ride leader or Road Captain. Helmets are required. Lights (front and rear), RoadIDs and cell phones are recommended.
Remember – we want to be awesome representatives for cycling and spread a love for our great sport locally by obeying all traffic laws and riding in a safe and courteous manner. Ride safely and have fun!

Burnt Bridge Nature Trail

Saturday, September 18th, 2021

Length: 16 miles
Pace: 12mph
Terrain: Moderate
Elevation: 750 feet
Ride Type: Group
Cancellation Guidelines: nothing – we’re rolling!

Details:
If you like to avoid cars as much as possible while biking then this paved nature trail is the ride for you! Ever wonder how this trail connects from 92nd Ave all the way to Fruit Valley Rd? Follow us! This route follows Burnt Bridge Creek and beyond through a variety of landscapes, including open grasslands, wetlands, and forests.
This route does have a few short moderate to significant hills with a total elevation gain of 750 ft for the total ride. We’ll regroup at the tops of hills.
We start at NE 92nd (see the location noted below). 
East on Burton, Right on 90th, turns into 92nd, right on 19th Street.
REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.  Contact me if you have any difficulty.  Our registration collects your waiver signature AND emergency contact information.  Important!
Please arrive 15 minutes early to be part of the announcements and safety briefing.
Bring a bike in good working order (pump up those tires), wear your helmet (REQUIRED), and tuck in some water and a tube that fits your wheel.
The published pace is 12mph (social pace). This is the maximum speed of the ride; a rider should be able to sustain this speed on flat terrain with no wind.
This is a group ride meaning that riders stay together at the published pace for the entire ride; we will regroup at tops of hills if needed.
Lights are great to have on your bike. Bells are great for notifying pedestrians or cyclists that you’re passing, but “On your left!” works just as well.
Check out the route/cue sheet here.

Notes:
Please arrive 15 minutes early to be a part of the announcements and safety briefing. Riders are expected to have read the Safe Riding Policy and be familiar with the Ride Style Definitions. Please direct questions to the ride leader or Road Captain. Helmets are required. Lights (front and rear), RoadIDs and cell phones are recommended.
Remember – we want to be awesome representatives for cycling and spread a love for our great sport locally by obeying all traffic laws and riding in a safe and courteous manner. Ride safely and have fun!

Burnt Bridge Nature Trail

Saturday, September 11th, 2021

Length: 16 miles
Pace: 12mph
Terrain: Moderate
Elevation: 750 feet
Ride Type: Group
Cancellation Guidelines: nothing – we’re rolling!

Details:
If you like to avoid cars as much as possible while biking then this paved nature trail is the ride for you! Ever wonder how this trail connects from 92nd Ave all the way to Fruit Valley Rd? Follow us! This route follows Burnt Bridge Creek and beyond through a variety of landscapes, including open grasslands, wetlands, and forests.
This route does have a few short moderate to significant hills with a total elevation gain of 750 ft for the total ride. We’ll regroup at the tops of hills.
We start at NE 92nd (see the location noted below). 
East on Burton, Right on 90th, turns into 92nd, right on 19th Street.
REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.  Contact me if you have any difficulty.  Our registration collects your waiver signature AND emergency contact information.  Important!
Please arrive 15 minutes early to be part of the announcements and safety briefing.
Bring a bike in good working order (pump up those tires), wear your helmet (REQUIRED), and tuck in some water and a tube that fits your wheel.
The published pace is 12mph (social pace). This is the maximum speed of the ride; a rider should be able to sustain this speed on flat terrain with no wind.
This is a group ride meaning that riders stay together at the published pace for the entire ride; we will regroup at tops of hills if needed.
Lights are great to have on your bike. Bells are great for notifying pedestrians or cyclists that you’re passing, but “On your left!” works just as well.
Check out the route/cue sheet here.

Notes:
Please arrive 15 minutes early to be a part of the announcements and safety briefing. Riders are expected to have read the Safe Riding Policy and be familiar with the Ride Style Definitions. Please direct questions to the ride leader or Road Captain. Helmets are required. Lights (front and rear), RoadIDs and cell phones are recommended.
Remember – we want to be awesome representatives for cycling and spread a love for our great sport locally by obeying all traffic laws and riding in a safe and courteous manner. Ride safely and have fun!

Contact info:
Contact(s):Shawn Hamburg
360 836 0463 (p)
360 836 0463 (c)
purchising360@gmail.com

Exploring Vancouver’s riverfront by bike

Friday, November 20th, 2020

I-5 bridge from Vancouver’s River Renaissance Trail.
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

[Read more…]

Exploring Vancouver’s Burnt Bridge Creek Trail

Friday, October 9th, 2020

Yes it’s another state. But this is just 10 miles from north Portland!
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

[Read more…]

Vancouver (Washington) council says yes to protected bike lanes, no to 393 parking spaces

Wednesday, February 26th, 2020
Existing conditions versus what was adopted on Monday night.

[Read more…]

Has Portland’s Lack of Gated Communities Contributed to Its Cycling Success?

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Recently I was planning the route for a Puddlecycle ride called “The Two Bridges” that goes over both the I-5 and I-205 bridges staying on the Vancouver side of the Columbia River. The goal was to stay as close to the river as possible. This was initially easy, as Vancouver has the Renaissance Trail that you can hop on right after coming off the Interstate (I-5) Bridge. The trail seemingly ends a mile later at the Kaiser Shipyard where they built Liberty ships during World War II. But you can ride to the North around that yard on a wide sidewalk, and the trail picks up again on the other side.
[Read more…]

A first for Washington: Green paint for bike lanes on a state highway

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015
washdotgreen

Drawing courtesy Washington DOT.

The Washington State Department of Transportation is going green to try and make a large highway intersection a bit safer to ride a bike on.
[Read more…]

Vancouver plans its first raised bike lane

Monday, August 31st, 2015
Screenshot 2015-08-31 at 8.42.29 AM

Portland’s neighbors to the north are planning a project that could set an important precedent in Clark County: a street rebuild that’s currently set to include a raised, protected bike lane.

It’s part of the planned expansion of SE 1st Street between 164th and 177th avenues, which is currently a two-lane street. The changes would add six-foot-wide sidewalks, raised five-foot-wide bike lanes and six-foot wide drainage swales to each side of the street, plus a center turn lane.

This neighborhood is north and a bit east from 122nd Avenue in Portland, and the context is somewhat similar: the auto-oriented residential neighborhoods that cover most of the area don’t offer a connected grid, so 1st Street is one of the only ways to get east and west, on a bike or otherwise.

[Read more…]

Vancouver toasts second year sucesses of Bike Clark County

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013
Policymakers Ride - Gorge Edition-27

Bike Clark County founder
Eric Giacchino.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Bike Clark County celebrated its second anniversary with a party Friday night in Vancouver attended by bike activists and enthusiasts from all over the county. And there was also one notable attendee from Portland, author and journalist Jeff Mapes, who journeyed up by bike over the Columbia River via the Interstate Bridge (and had something to say about it later).

The founder of Bike Clark County, Eric Giacchino opened the event. “I had no idea when I hatched this organization,” he shared with the crowd, “that it would grow like this.” Among the accomplishments Giacchino cited for the year were the 600 elementary and middle school kids who attended the group’s bike safety and education programs, the 50 bikes repaired and donated to lower income children and the group’s role in organizing the first Open Streets event in Vancouver and advocating for the addition of bike lanes along a major bicycle corridor. “And we could do a lot more,” he added, “if we had more volunteers.”[Read more…]