Racing article archives

[Cyclists compete in a circuit race at Portland International Raceway.]

From road racing to mountain biking, and everything in between, browse the headlines below for coverage of Portland’s competitive racing scene.


Everyone 18 and under races for free at the Portland Trophy Cup series

Posted on September 12th, 2017 at 9:23 am.

Krugers Crossing-44
Race young man! Race free!
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Here on BikePortland we often talk about removing barriers to bicycling. When it comes to racing, the barrier is often a finanical one as equipment costs and race entry fees can quickly make the sport inaccessible too all but the most well-heeled.

That’s why we were happy to see that the Portland Trophy Cup, a five race series that starts tonight at Portland International Raceway (just north of the Kenton neighborhood), is letting everyone 18 years and under race for free. For everyone else each race entry costs $18 a week. That might not seem like a big deal, but for some young racers it might be the difference between staying at home or showing up.
[Read more…]

Cyclocross Crusade organizers retract new logo after negative community feedback

Posted on September 1st, 2017 at 9:54 am.

Organizers of the Cyclocross Crusade, a Portland-based race series founded in 1993, have shelved a new logo design after concerns that it too closely resembled logos used by white supremacy groups.

The logo debuted at a kickoff event for the 2017 season on Sunday and was met with negative feedback from some in the community.

Late Thursday night the organization posted the following statement to their social media accounts:

We released the new logo for the Cyclocross Crusade on Sunday in hopes it could convey the fun and inclusive spirit of our bike race series.

We apologize for not recognizing sooner that the design may be too closely associated with symbols used by those who promote hate, racism, divisiveness and fear.

The Cyclocross Crusade series wouldn’t be what it is without our community. To be clear: yes, you belong. The logo will be retracted immediately.

[Read more…]

Cyclocross season is upon us: Here’s a guide to the action

Posted on August 25th, 2017 at 12:08 pm.

Cross Crusade in Bend-55.jpg

Time to start planning your practicing, racing, spectating, and costumes.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Believe it or not, it’s time to start think about cyclocross.
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Riders duel for fastest quarter-mile at new sprint race series

Posted on August 16th, 2017 at 10:03 am.

Monday Night PIR Sprint Races-8.jpg

Some riders go as fast as 30 mph on the same track used by racecar drivers.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

It’s the essence of racing: Line up next to your competition; point your bike down an open track; pedal as fast as you can; winner moves on to the next heat. No variables. No crowds. No excuses. It’s simple, but it’s far from boring. And it’s a tough workout.

The quarter-mile has always been a staple of auto racing. Now Portland has a drag race series for cycling.
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Suffering and tulip selfies at inaugural ‘Wooden Shoe Kermesse’

Posted on May 11th, 2017 at 11:16 am.

Racers mixed with tourists taking tulip selfies at Sunday’s Wooden Shoe Kermesse in Woodburn.
(Photos by Jake Tong/The Wolfsmouth Cycling)

It was a quintessential Oregon scene last weekend when about 160 bicycle racers descended on a tulip farm in Woodburn (about 32 miles south of Portland).
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Weeknight road racing returns to Portland tonight

Posted on April 17th, 2017 at 3:02 pm.

Racing at PIR

Close to town and carfree, the 2-mile laps of Portland International Raceway are a perfect place to race.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

At the end of thge 2016 season, when promoter Jim Anderson walked away from the Race Monday Night series at Portland International Raceway, it could have been the end of a 20-year Portland tradition.
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Let’s help 15-year-old Aedin Valente open the Alpenrose Velodrome Snack Shack

Posted on April 7th, 2017 at 11:34 am.

Aedin Valente, aspiring businessman and track racer.
(Photo: Norrene Godfrey)

Friends. I have a favor to ask.

A 15-year-old from Astoria named Aedin Valente wants to start his own business. When he heard that the Alpenrose Velodrome needed someone to run the snack this summer, he decided this was his big opportunity.

The only thing he needs to make the Alpenrose Snack Shack a reality is to raise another $1,000 or so via the GoFundMe campaign set up by his aunt Norrene Godfrey (who happens to be an awesome track racer and Alpenrose regular).

Here’s what Aedin said when Norrene asked him why he wants to do this job. “I want to run the Alpenrose snack shack so I can gain experience in the business world, plus it is super fun to do. I want to raise funds so people will work hard and try and win the races. It’s fun to watch. I like that the people are super nice to me and very supportive.”
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Portland’s first unsanctioned, virtual stage race starts this weekend

Posted on March 2nd, 2017 at 11:12 am.

Event flyer

This weekend a new type of cycling event will start on the streets in and around Portland. It’s called La Boucle Des Roses and it’s unlike anything we’ve heard of before.

French for “The Loop of Roses,” La Boucle is an unsanctioned race/ride with five stages that will take place between this Saturday March 4th and Saturday April 1st.

Unsanctioned rides are nothing new to Portland. We’ve seen huge turnouts for the annual De Ronde and its sister ride, La Doyenne. Last weekend there were about 70 people who showed up for the Timber Logjam. “Organizers” of those events simply pick a date and mark a route (both online and on on-the-road), and sit back and let the promotion happen through word-of-mouth. What makes La Boucle different is its presentation as a multi-stage event and its use of an online platform to tabulate times and rankings for everyone who enters — regardless of when they complete the routes.

La Boucle’s organizer Will Hahn says the event is a “stride forward for Oregon cycling.” It’s his response to a recent decline in sanctioned road racing events statewide. A recent thread on the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association email list titled, “State of Cycling, Its Decline, and Events” brought out dozens of voices to hash out the causes and impacts of why people are racing less and why events continue to fall off the racing calendar. Membership at OBRA is down as well and it seems like everyone has an opinion as to why. Ideas I’ve heard include: the difficulty of getting permits for road closures and a lack of affordable and quality venues; a lack of profit for promoters; people doing their own rides and “competing” via Strava; and so on.

Hahn’s La Boucle avoids some of those hurdles (administrative costs) and embraces others (use of technology). The low overhead allows Hahn to manage the race for a relatively low entry fee of $22. The five-stage Baker City Classic by comparison, costs $140. To help raise money for the prize purse, Hahn has set a GoFundMe campaign. So far he’s raised just $20 of his $2,000 goal. To protect himself from legal claims in the event of a crash or other accident, Hahn will require each official participant to fill out a waiver form.

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Here’s more from Hahn’s description of the ride on the Ride With GPS event page:

The idea of this race grew out of the desire to grow Oregon bicycle racing from a grassroots level, to promote the tenets of good bike riding and to satisfy the missing holes in the Oregon race calendar. My intent is to draw riders from all walks of life, to pit them against excellent courses that would otherwise be off-limits and create a renewable system of racing that eases the costly burdens of race promotion.

I will describe this as a race, but it is more akin to a mass start Gran Fondo, open to all and free…

These courses are (for the most part) difficult and long. They are all marked with paint, but it is up to you to know the courses before hand. There are no referees or course marshals, no follow cars and no feed zones; other than those provided by yourself. Riders who break traffic laws aren’t following the tenets of good bike racing, sullying the image of cyclists and creating an unsafe atmosphere for other riders, please don’t be this person.

There will be a roll-out at 10:00 am from the bottom of NW Saltzman Road (off Highway 30) for Saturday’s opening time trial stage. You don’t have to be there to have your time counted and the course will be “open” for a one week period. To vye for prizes however, and to be considered an official participant, you must show up to at least two Saturday starts in the five-week series.

For the full details, view the official Technical Guide (PDF).

Credit to Hahn for trying something new. Do you think it will catch on?

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Photos from Day 2 of SSCXWCXPDX, a.k.a. ‘Burning Man on bikes’

Posted on December 5th, 2016 at 11:38 am.

A shark ramp (to jump the shark, get it?) was one of the many creative obstacles on the course.(Photos by Rob Kerr)

A shark ramp (to jump the shark, get it?) was one of the many creative obstacles on the course.
(Photos by Rob Kerr)

The officially unofficial Singlespeed Cyclocross World Championships (SSCXWCXPDX) are now nothing more than a memory — or a hangover if you were lucky enoughy to be out there.
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Crazy around every corner: Photos from the Cross Crusade Halloween weekend in Bend

Posted on October 31st, 2016 at 4:00 pm.

Cross Crusade in Bend-45.jpg

This running-of-the-bulls inspired costume was one of the most creative of the day.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

The River City Bicycle Cyclocross Crusade was at an entirely different level over the weekend. With its annual stop in Bend for races number five and six in the eight-race series, it was Oregon cyclocross at its peak. There was creativity, debauchery, inspiration, and fun around every corner.
[Read more…]