Portland State University

State’s ORcycle app is now a one-stop shop for reporting road safety issues

by on November 19th, 2015 at 8:35 am

orcycle screenshot
A screenshot from the
ORcycle app.

If you run into a bike safety problem in Oregon and own a smartphone, you no longer need to know who to complain to.

The ORcycle mobile app, a partnership between the Oregon Department of Transportation and Portland State University, has just been hooked up directly to the state’s “Ask ODOT” hotline, which has pledged to forward all reports it receives about bike safety issues to the appropriate local agency — or to its own team, if the road is owned by ODOT.

It’s a huge leap for the project, which has existed in demo form for a year but has been little-used because any reports were stashed for weeks or months under PSU’s supervision rather than piped directly to ODOT, let alone forwarded to other agencies.

Now, however, the free app has been integrated directly into the state agency’s operations.


League of American Bicyclists says Portland State is ‘Platinum’

by on November 6th, 2015 at 12:00 pm

PSU's Bike Hub
PSU’s Bike Hub is a shop and repair center located on campus.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Portland State’s football team isn’t the only thing getting national attention these days: the school is now ranked among the top five in the country in terms of its bike-friendliness. (more…)

Bike-friendliness and walk-friendliness are actually pretty different, study says

by on October 28th, 2015 at 1:05 pm

Rosa Parks Way -3
Rosa Parks Way.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Portland has a long way to go, but it’s one of the country’s best cities to bike in. Sad to say, it isn’t yet one of the country’s best cities to walk in.

So why do so many people, here and elsewhere, speak as if there’s an activity called “bikingandwalking” that can be encouraged all at once?

Some new research from a recent Portland State University engineering grad helps to disentangle the science of these two awesome activities.


Portland State University looks for solutions as biking decline continues

by on October 7th, 2015 at 10:04 am

bike racks at psu
Bike commuting remains common at PSU, but it’s dropping, and no one is sure why.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

In a trend that could develop into a huge expense for Portland’s largest school, the number of people biking to Portland’s single most popular bike destination has continued to fall.

The four roles of bike shops: new PSU thesis breaks it down

by on August 21st, 2015 at 11:29 am

The Outer Rim Bike Shop-1
Brandon Fite at the Outer Rim bike shop in Gateway.(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Bike shops matter. And like so many brick-and-mortar retailers across this country, many American bike shops have been failing.

How scared should we be about this? And if we’re scared, what’s to be done?

A newly minted Portland State University graduate and employee of the (perfectly healthy) Northwest Portland institution 21st Avenue Cycles is advancing that conversation with a senior thesis he published this year. In it, he proposes a typology (“four types of local bike shops”) and interviews five Portland bike shop professionals about the roles bike shops play and how they interact with a bike-friendly city.


PSU grad students will help plan Green Loop and North Portland Greenway

by on March 10th, 2015 at 9:04 am

green loop options

Examples from (in order) San Francisco, Copenhagen, New York City and New York City in an online survey about preferred ideas for a “green loop” bikeway connecting the South Park Blocks with Tilikum Crossing.
(Screenshot from survey)

Two of Portland’s most visionary long-term biking projects will get a boost this spring from two teams of Portland State University planners-in-training.


PSU students back plan to add parklet to SW 4th Ave food carts

by on January 5th, 2015 at 4:56 pm

A few blocks north of the spot where Southwest 4th Avenue becomes Barbur Boulevard, a five-lane city street has been slowly becoming a place for people to enjoy. A team of Portland State University students is pushing this spot to its next step.

If it comes together — the current step is a crowdfunding campaign that would raise $15,350 for construction and the first two years of maintenance — it’d be one of the first fully public Street Seats installation in the city.


New TriMet path carves better route to South Waterfront, but PSU link still awkward

by on September 25th, 2014 at 3:55 pm

orange line path lead
The wide sidewalk along SW Naito Parkway between Lincoln and Harrison.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Thanks to TriMet’s nearly completed Orange Line, the main bike route to the South Waterfront got smoother this week.

But as we discussed in a post last week, there are still significant complications with the bike connections to Portland State University that could have been solved if it had been possible to run a bike/walk/skate path on the new MAX viaduct.


Comment of the Week: The missed opportunity of Tilikum Crossing

by on September 19th, 2014 at 2:21 pm

Problems with the west-side landing of Tilikum Crossing.
(Image: Ted Buehler)

The new transit/bike/walk bridge opening across the Willamette next year has become one of Portland’s go-to examples of how we continue to do great things. And it’s certainly true that it’s a massive investment in active transportation.

But as reader Ted Buehler argued in a series of comments this week below our story about the apparent decline of biking among PSU students, Tilikum Crossing was so close to being so much better.

The Tilikum Bridge isn’t going to help all that much, because Tilikum to PSU will still be crap. Whereas MAX has a long flyover from the west end of the Tilikum Bridge to SW 4th and Lincoln.

If they had funded a mixed use path on the MAX bridge, you’d be able to go straight from OMSI to here: http://goo.gl/maps/LLiVp without playing fender tag with cars on surface streets.


Student biking to Portland State is down by a third over two years

by on September 12th, 2014 at 8:36 am

empty racks
PSU’s bike parking will be more crowded once the fall term starts, but student biking rates have leveled off and started to drop even as employee biking has kept climbing.
(Photos: M.Andersen and J.Maus/BikePortland)

Bike transportation among Portland State University students peaked at 12 percent in 2010-2011 and has since fallen to 8 percent, newly released student surveys show.

And in a development its transportation director called “alarming,” the popularity of driving to PSU classes rose last year for the first time since 2000.