15 years later, woman reunites with her first wheels thanks to Hillsboro student bike club

by on June 9th, 2015 at 9:16 am

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Left, Layton Fishback’s old bike; right, Fishback, her
daughter Jubilee and Sean Hagebusch of the
Poynter bike club.
(Photos via Hillsboro School District)

A Hillsboro woman will get a chance to pass her childhood bicycle on to her daughter after a chance reunion made possible by Poynter Middle School’s bike club.

Hillsboro School District posted the one-chance-in-10,000 story on its website Monday.

It begins from the perspective of John Sarrazin, an adult leader in the Poynter Middle School after-school bike repair program, who was promoting the program at the Proud to be HSD Festival in downtown Hillsboro on May 30:


Comment of the Week: The real cost of having unsafe streets

by on June 5th, 2015 at 6:34 pm

Eleni rides home alone-1
On her own.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Portland is, thankfully, a relatively safe city to get around. Even the United States in general, with our 30,000 road deaths every year, is full of hundreds of millions of people who aren’t getting physically hurt.

But the real cost of Vision 30,000 (as I saw a local transportation planner put it the other day) isn’t broken bodies. And it doesn’t have anything to do with biking in particular. It’s the fact that almost all of us spend our entire lives in a constant, low-level fear of losing our daughter, our son, our spouse, our best friend, to traffic.

How does that perfectly reasonable fear shape our lives? How does it lead us to shape theirs?


Comment of the Week: The joy of discovering bikes as a kid in Portland

by on May 1st, 2015 at 4:33 pm

Vanilla's kids bike-12
Soon, soon.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

As someone who didn’t really come to appreciate biking until I was in high school, my mind is sometimes blown by thinking about people born into biking life here in modern Portland.

A comment Wednesday morning from BikePortland reader Katherine, beneath Jonathan’s ride-along with a dad and his four-year-old daughter, conveys it better than I ever could.


Student energy will soon help power Glencoe Elementary, literally

by on February 18th, 2015 at 3:35 pm

Two plug-in electric bikes donated this month to Southeast Portland’s Glencoe Elementary will introduce students to the concept of pedal-powered energy.


Kidical Mass PDX invites biking parents to join family ride planning for 2015

by on February 2nd, 2015 at 10:53 am

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From Portland’s first Kidical Mass in 2008.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Kidical Mass PDX, the tradition of family bike rides each month exploring neighborhoods around Portland, will hold its annual planning meeting one week from Saturday and is inviting anyone who might have ideas to join in.

“We’ve had a pretty stable leadership the last few years, and that’s been great,” said Katie Proctor, who took the handlebars of Kidical Mass in 2010. “But we also are feeling a little set in our ways, so we’re looking for new blood to come in and shake things up.”


This is what happens when you ask Portlanders to build balance bikes

by on December 5th, 2014 at 2:01 pm

Balance bikes for bid. See more photos below.
(Photo: CCC)

From the Bike Mechanic Challenge back in June to their successful Transportation Trivia Nights, the northeast Portland based Community Cycling Center has a knack for dreaming up great ways to support their cause.

But this one might take the cake.

In the spirit of the season when little kids dream of their first bike, the CCC challenged five of its staffers to compete in a “Balance Bike Build-Off”. For the uninitiated, a balance bike is a tiny bike for toddlers without pedals or gears and a seat so low it can be powered by running instead of pedaling. They’re simply the best way to learn to how to balance, and ultimately ride, a bike.

Portlanders celebran ‘Dia de los Muertos’ con paseo en bicicleta

by on November 3rd, 2014 at 2:25 pm

elizabeth q
Líder del paseo, Elizabeth Quiroz de Mujeres en Movimiento y Bicycle Transportation Alliance.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

To read this post in English, see below. Le pedimos disculpas por cualquier error de traducción. Por favor nos dice acerca de ellos y vamos a solucionarlos.

Con la cantante oaxaqueña Lila Downs canturreando desde un equipo de música de remolque, 35 Portlanders de varias edades se reunieron domingo en Cully para un viaje para celebrar el Día de los Muertos.


Portland needs to invoke the lifeboat rule

by on October 7th, 2014 at 2:23 pm

kid on bike
Amsterdammers are made, not born.
(Photo in Amsterdam by J. Maus/BikePortland)

America's Next Bicycle Capital

Part of our series, America’s Next Bicycle Capital, where we share community voices about the future of biking in Portland. This week’s guest writer is A.J. Zelada, who chaired the Oregon Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee from 2011 to 2013.

The lifeboat rule needs to be invoked: parents and children first.

I returned from the Netherlands a few weeks ago and I was struck, of course, by how different it was. I admit, I am not so sure it is reproducible here as much as I’ve hawked it in the past. My partner and I bicycled from Bruges, Belgium to Amsterdam up the North Sea coast line but catching Ghent, Delft, Leiden and many other towns along the incredible segregated bike lanes that simply connect everything. [Publisher’s note: Follow Jerry’s adventures here.]

What struck me was that Americans have a missing childhood developmental stage of being an infant, a toddler, and a child on a bike before they get on a bike independently. And even though little Americans are propped up in a baby trailer or behind the rider’s seat, they still miss what parents in Belgium and the Netherlands teach their kids.


As a low-car generation rises, youth organizers step up transportation activism

by on April 22nd, 2014 at 9:42 am

Kelly Hansen of the Community Cycling Center, Nicole Johnson of OPAL, Camille Bales of Grant High School and Adriana Rangel of De La Salle High School at a panel on youth transportation advocacy Monday.
(Photo by M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Few Portlanders rely more on low-car transportation than teens. And as many factors have made car use by young people dramatically less common, some are getting more sophisticated in advocating for better public transit, biking and walking.

A panel on the subject at the Oregon Active Transportation Summit Monday was enough to make city staffer Janis McDonald call herself “embarrassed” on the city’s behalf that it isn’t doing more to tap youth advocates’ opinions and expertise.

Portland’s best (and worst) elementary schools for biking and walking

by on January 17th, 2014 at 10:37 am

Trillium Charter School bike train-24-19
Typical morning drop-off at Trillium Public Charter School, one of 51 elementary schools surveyed by the city’s Safe Routes to School program.
(Photo by J.Maus/BikePortland)

Slowly but surely, Portland seems to be edging toward its transportation goal for elementary schoolers: getting as many of them to walk or bike to school as the average American kid did in 1969.

For the last two years, progress has leveled off, just as the city’s goals for adult transportation have. But (much like workplaces) some local elementaries have been far more successful than others.