Mayor Wheeler, Commissioner Rubio announce $2.4 million climate change investment

Part of the money would fund efforts to decarbonize the transportation sector and encourage zero-emission deliveries.
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and Commissioner Carmen Rubio are calling a plan to spend $2.4 million an on climate change-related work an “unprecedented investment” that will enable them to “take accelerated, aggressive climate action rooted in racial justice.”

Rubio, who oversees the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, said in a press release this morning that, “Climate change is not stopping, or even slowing—and our opportunity to reduce carbon emissions and build resilience is fast closing.”

The funding will be included in the 2022-2023 BPS budget request and will include several transportation-related initiative, three new staff positions, and more.

Here’s where the money will go:

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Protests and election loom over today’s police budget vote

Screengrab from video by Sergio Olmos shows officers shoving protestors to the ground last night.
(Source: @MrOlmos on Twitter)

With all the political drama of the past week, our local debate over a proposal to cut $18 million from the Portland Police Bureau seems like it happened ages ago. But it’s only been one week since Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty called her council colleagues “cowardly” for not voting on her proposal.

The vote is scheduled to happen when council meets again today (11/5) at 2:00 pm.

While the faces on city council haven’t changed, Tuesday’s election is still likely to influence the vote. Hardesty endorsed her ally on the proposal, Commissioner Chloe Eudaly — who lost her race by a large margin. Following Tuesday’s vote, and after she hung-up on the council meeting in disgust before it was officially adjourned, Hardesty endorsed the challenger to current Mayor Ted Wheeler — but he won his race by a comfortable margin (although he failed to win a majority of votes thanks to a large number of write-in votes).

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Editorial: Amid historic cuts, thoughts on “fundamental restructuring” of PBOT

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward
bike traffic in Portland-2-2.jpg

Severe cuts will force us
to make bold decisions on how
we prioritize funding.
(Photos © J. Maus)

The Portland Bureau of Transportation made an historic announcement on Monday. In order to balance their budget, the agency needs to make $16 million in ongoing cuts. Not one-time cuts to patch a lean year, but ongoing and permanent into the foreseeable future.

This is a very big deal that is likely to fundamentally change how PBOT does business (read that sentence again). It’s also an opportunity to consider a complete restructuring of how the bureau goes about its business, where funding should be cut, and what expenditures should be prioritized.

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Looming budget cuts could force tough decisions at PBOT

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward
Sunday Parkways SE-3-2

Budget cuts could force hard decisions
on popular programs like Sunday Parkways.
(Photo © J. Maus)

As reported last week by The Oregonian, the City of Portland faces steep cuts in its 2012-2013 budget.

“As a result of global, national, and local factors that may impact the City and the uncertainty surrounding the economic outlook,” reads a memo sent to all agency directors from City Council last week, “we are asking bureaus… to prepare significant program cuts for FY 2012-2013.”

While a more detailed analysis of the revenue forecast isn’t expected until December, the writing is on the wall — cuts will have to be made. The big question for is, where?

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