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City’s first speed camera already having major impact

Posted by on September 23rd, 2016 at 10:22 am

This SUV was caught by Portland's new speed camera going 72 mph in a 40 mph zone.(Photo: (PBOT)

This SUV was caught by Portland’s new speed camera going 72 mph in a 40 mph zone. View a video of it below.
(Photo: (PBOT)

Oregon’s first speed camera has had a very busy first month. And that’s great news for fans of safer streets.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation installed the camera on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway on August 25th. It’s been issuing only warning since then but the agency announced this morning that as of tomorrow (9/24) the warnings end and the citations begin.

If the first month is any indication, the camera will be a huge success (unless people don’t mind getting tickets). PBOT says the presence of the camera (and associated signage) has already reduced top-end speeding by 93 percent (more stats below).

To go along with their announcement today, PBOT is doing something else that’s very smart. They’re using the media to shame unsafe drivers. As both warning and example of how the camera works, they’ve singled out a person they caught driving a white SUV at 72 mph — in a 40 mph zone. Watch the dangerous driver get caught on film in the video below:

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While anecdotes like that are fun, PBOT is keeping their promise that all their Vision Zero-related work will be based on data. Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway (locals call it “BHH”) is part of the city’s High Crash Network and stats show that its dangerous not only for people in cars but that people who walk along or across the road are twice as likely to be struck by another road user than the average city street.

We can sit around and talk about how inherently dangerous streets like BHH are, but these cameras give us a way to add authority and focus to those conversations.

State law requires warnings like this at least 100 yards prior to the camera.(Photo: PBOT)

State law requires warnings like this at least 100 yards prior to the camera.
(Photo: PBOT)

Here are some facts about the BHH camera released by PBOT today:

— Before the cameras were installed, an average 1,417 vehicles a day traveled 51 mph or more over the speed limit faster, according to readings by a pneumatic tube laid across the roadway.

— During the warning period from Aug. 24 to Sept. 18, an average 93 vehicles a day were found traveling 51 mph or faster — a 93.4 percent reduction from the tube count.

— In the first week of the warning period, cameras recorded an average 115 violations a day. Violations dropped to an average 72 a day by the week of Sept. 12 to 18.

PBOT Director Leah Treat, who had to spearhead a change in Oregon law just to be able to install cameras like these, said, “For us to reach our Vision Zero goal of ending traffic fatalities and serious injuries, we need tools like these cameras.”

Thanks to the passage of HB 2621 last year the City of Portland can install speed cameras (PBOT calls them “safety cameras”) only on designated High Crash Corridors within Portland city limits. When someone is caught speeding by one of these cameras, the typical fine is $160. By law, that revenue must be spent to pay for the camera program or to make safety improvements along High Crash Corridors.

Next spring PBOT will roll out cameras on three very notorious streets: SE 122nd Avenue between Foster and Powell, Marine Drive, and Outer SE Division.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

The sad thing is the SUV doesn’t appear to be going that fast- I assume the other traffic is going well over 40 too.

Vinny
Guest
Vinny

Just based on the length of the pavement striping I estimated the SUV at about 68 mph, pretty close to the 72 noted in the description. Same method shows the red car at 42 mph and the white car at about 44 mph. The truck is passing the white car but hard to estimate. So everyone is speeding but not necessarily going crazy fast.

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

Thanks. Guess it was just my impression- 42 and 44 are basically the speed limit (at least compared to 72).

Spiffy
Subscriber

“42 and 44 are basically the speed limit”

yes, that’s what drivers think… they’re “close enough” to the speed limit… no harm if they’re just 2 or 4 over…

I say zero tolerance! tickets for going 1 mph over! it’s a LIMIT!

James Sherbondy
Guest
James Sherbondy

So, maybe not a history lesson, but back in the day. The margin for “error” was 10 PERCENT, not MPH. Over time though, somehow, it morphed into a flat 10 MPH, no matter what the speed. 72 in a 40 should be a felony as far as I’m concerned. That’s basically the same as randomly shooting a gun any direction in a crowded place.

Joe in Spokane
Guest
Joe in Spokane

I think a big part of the problem is analog (“normal”) speedometers. The needle is kind of pointing toward 40, so the driver calls it 40. Of course, they’re always on the high side.

I have a Chevy Volt, with a digital speedometer. I can easily tell if I’m going 36 in a 35 mph zone, and decelerate gently. All cars should have an easy-to-read digital speedometer.

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

Car speedos are accurate within a percentage.

.. of the highest speed:

To begin with, manufacturers are afforded the latitude to aim for within plus-or-minus two percent of absolute accuracy or to introduce bias to read high on a sliding scale of from minus-one to plus-three percent at low speeds to zero to plus-four percent above 55 mph. And those percentages are not of actual speed but rather a percentage of the total speed range indicated on the dial. So the four-percent allowable range on an 85-mph speedometer is 3.4 mph, and the acceptable range on a 150-mph speedometer is 6.0 mph.

https://www.quora.com/On-a-vehicle-dashboard-is-the-speedometer-accurate-or-does-it-incorporate-a-margin-for-error

BB
Guest
BB

There is very little tolerance for stopping at a stop sign. Heck I don’t even know what a stop is.

But when it comes to speeding 9mph over is not good enough.

Adam
Guest
Adam

How many miles over the speed limit do you have to be for it to activate I wonder?

The reason I ask is, the first car – the red one – was flooring it too. Yet no flash. At least 55mph I would guess.

I think if you are going 50 in a 45 zone, you should get a ticket. Otherwise, what’s the point?

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

The SUV’s driver is only getting a warning for 72mph?

9watts
Guest
9watts

Just like bikers who roll the stop sign at Ladd’s Circle 😉

Funny how Car Head gives so much lenience to evident, dangerous, flagrant law breaking but slams someone on a bike doing something far less harmful, and something that a neighboring state even allows.

soren
Subscriber

Is there any evidence that running the stop signs at Ladd’s has ever harmed anyone?

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

I’d ask that question about both cars and bikes.

JeffS
Guest
JeffS

Sure. The persistent inability to cross the road with the knowledge that approaching traffic will stop when legally required to do so. That’s undeniable harm in my book.

Maybe if you pretended that it was a poor or black neighborhood you could muster some sympathy for the residents.

wsbob
Guest
wsbob

The unique circumstances at Ladd’s Addition, in which both the city and great numbers of people biking, have appropriated one of that neighborhoods’ diagonally laid out streets for a high volume bike route…harms the neighborhoods’ livability when road users decline to stop at the stop signs as they proceed through the neighborhood.

Biking culture, fundamentally is, or at least its advocates seem to seek to present biking as wholly supportive of neighborhood livability. Yet when a maximum convenience of people biking becomes subject to a simple, basic road use obligation such as proceeding through a neighborhood at a peaceful rate of speed considerate of people living in the neighborhood, including stopping at stop signs, the rationalizations attempting to justify maximum convenience for people biking, at the expense of the neighborhood, seem to have no end.

Excessively high speeds of motor vehicle on major thoroughfares, used also by people traveling by bike, are an entirely different situation than that of streets through quiet neighborhoods.

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

Commuting culture, fundamentally is, or at least its advocates seem to seek to present driving as wholly supportive of neighborhood livability. Yet when a maximum convenience of people driving becomes subject to a simple, basic road use obligation such as proceeding through a neighborhood at a peaceful rate of speed considerate of people living in the neighborhood, including stopping at stop signs, the rationalizations attempting to justify maximum convenience for people driving, at the expense of the neighborhood, seem to have no end.

wsbob
Guest
wsbob

Nearly word for word, you’ve stolen my writing to try make your point. I would have thought you’d have more respect for yourself than to stoop to plagiarism,

At any rate, I don’t think residents of Ladd’s Addition, or residents of any other neighborhood, are interested in rationalizing that it’s ok for people driving to not stop at stop signs…but not ok for people biking not to stop at stop signs.

Past bikeportland stories, and comments to them on the traffic situation in Ladd’s Addition, reported that, people objected to people driving and not stopping at the neighborhood’s stop signs (though there were fewer of them not stopping than there were people biking and not stopping.). And also, when police conducted their stop sign enforcement details, people driving that failed to adequately stop at the stop signs, got citations too.

I think it’s fair to presume that neighborhood residents would like everyone using the streets within their neighborhood, to do so within the prescription of the law, and with consideration for people living there.

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

Sorry, you lost me at plagiarism.

wsbob
Guest
wsbob

“Sorry, you lost me at plagiarism.” timmons

I think you do understand that you took the lame and dishonest approach of stealing my writing, instead of using your own writing, to make your point. You presented my work, as your own, making no note of whose writing it was, or the couple words you changed in what I’d written, to serve your own purpose: that’s plagiarism.

As to the central issue, I think definitely, efforts to bring about lower motor vehicle speeds that still allow efficient travel and transport… enables roads and streets to be safe and functional, and neighborhoods to retain a high quality of livability, is something worth putting energy into. Much more important, and far more likely to get worthwhile things done, than playing silly, dishonest games.

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

“stealing your writing” for criticism, with attribution being (literally) right there.

You may not like the style of “mad libs of sweeping statements”, but it ain’t plagiarism by any reasonable definition.

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

Eric,
Everyone in the first month.
Citations begin Saturday.

9watts
Guest
9watts

Hilarious!

Why so unbelievably generous?

Adam
Subscriber

Every speed camera program I have seen in other cities has this rule too. I suspect it may be a federal DOT rule.

9watts
Guest
9watts

Yes, but that is not an answer or an explanation of why.

resopmok
Guest
resopmok

Though I can’t know for sure, I would imagine it has to do with a series of legal cases that precede the decision.

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

9,
Most every change in law is accompanied by advance warning of when it goes into effect. In this case, the timing is variable from location to location, since it is the method of enforcement that has legally changed. Seem logical to give those affected a 30 day warning – and such warnings are common with PBOT when other things change in the right of way.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

My guess on how you feel about warnings depends on whether you see the goal of enforcement as prevention or punishment.

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

“I need prevention to keep myself from breaking the law. Other people clearly need punishment because I see them doing it all the time.”

PNP
Subscriber

This is great news. I’ve always thought it was odd that the law requires a sign giving drivers advance warning of speed enforcement or monitoring.

Adam
Guest
Adam

I’ve often thought about just hiding a giant remote flash in a tree or mounted on a pole or something.

No camera, just a giant, blinding flash! Activated remotely via a pocket keyfob.

Then just stand innocently at a bus stop, and randomly set it off.

Compliance in motorists would skyrocket!!!

Spiffy
Subscriber

that sounds illegal but I’ve seen plenty of roadside coffee stands with a strobe light aimed at the road so it’s probably legit… or they’re all breaking the law, which is quite likely as well…

Scott Kocher
Guest

I thought the same. Part of what’s amazing about the data is how effective the signs are at preventing speeding. On one hand, that’s even better than having speeding, and tickets, and crashes. On the other hand, it shows that cameras without signs could, in short order and without the sky falling, cause people to drive safely everywhere. That is a right we have as people, parents etc. and not one we should have to wait for.

colton
Guest
colton

is “51 mph or more over the speed limit” really what they meant? I mean that’s 51+35=86 MPH.

rick
Guest
rick

I think a ticket will be given for driving or riding a motorcycle at a speed above 50 mph. 51 and up.

wsbob
Guest
wsbob

“is “51 mph or more over the speed limit” really what they meant? I mean that’s 51+35=86 MPH.” colton

Doesn’t seem right to me either…thanks for making note of that. Has PBOT been asked to clarify?

Allison Sliter
Guest
Allison Sliter

I think it was just poorly worded, the same idea is repeated in the next bullet point to talk about the change and it said “51 mph or faster”

Brian
Guest
Brian

There is nobody at the wheel!

Tom Hardy
Guest
Tom Hardy

probably an “Autodriver”/

Allan Rudwick
Subscriber

I don’t think these will hurt but the benefits are clearly overstated in this article. Roads are long, these things have an impact for maybe 1/4 mile in each direction.

rick
Guest
rick

True. Trail # 1 also keeps people walking and running on the side streets and trails on the north side of this highway. There are few walk and bike-friendly businesses along this highway from 65th Ave to Hillsdale town center.

George Dorn
Guest
George Dorn

Well, this is the first camera. If it works for the area it covers (and it appears to), the next logical step is to install more cameras, which solves the “roads are long” problem.

David Post
Guest

In Taiwan they have these every few miles on the highway, along with red light cameras at a few intersections. They also have a compulsory law that states if you get a ticket but you were not the one driving you either have to report who was driving or pay the ticket yourself.

Caitlin D
Subscriber

This sounds like a great improvement. More speed cameras, please!

Kate
Guest
Kate

These are an important tool to have in our toolbox, so good on Treat and PBOT for pursing the change in law to enable these on Portland’s streets!

Jonathan- do you know if these are going to be fixed cameras or whether they might move around on different parts of the corridor? That might address Allan’s concerns about people only slowing where they are expecting them.

wsbob
Guest
wsbob

The city could make use of camera vans too. It’s great how they’re able to be moved around so people thinking of driving excessively fast, don’t know exactly where the camera van will be.

It’s wonderful that Portland is taking initiative to manage speeds motor vehicles travel at on some of its roads that are particularly notorious for excessive speed.

One thing I think some people will wonder about, is why they have to face a penalty for driving over the speed limit during hours of the day when traffic is minimal…say hours between late night after 10 or 12, and before 6am.

They’ll rationalize that high speeds under those conditions pose little harm. Is it reasonable and fair to expect people to stay within the speed limit during hours when there’s very few people using the road…and why? Higher speed limits during off hours, could cut trip times for people driving then. Might be a cost savings for commercial traffic. On the other hand, higher speed limits allowed off hours, could turn roads into speedways…loud for nearby neighborhoods, and dangerous for anyone, not in a ‘speed at all costs’ mindset, that does happen to be on the road during those hours.

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

PPB already has two, but they are limited to 2 hours in any one spot and are required to be staffed…

Tom Hardy
Guest
Tom Hardy

This keeps the EMT’s and ambulance drivers busy scraping up the drunks and gangbangers blasting around between the hours around bar closing.

Bay Area Rider
Guest
Bay Area Rider

At least in California the traffic survey which the speed limit is based on is taken during off peak times. The traffic survey is based on the free flowing speed of cars, no large trucks or vehicles towing anything, that have a min of 5 seconds between cars. When the surveys are done per the CalTrans manual then the speed of100 cars is taken and the speed limit based on the 15th fastest car rounded to the closest 5 MPH. Yeah a stupid way to determine speed limits since this just causes the speeds to creep up till they reach the max speed for that type of road. The speed limit in California is suppose to be the max allowable speed under ideal conditions and in theory drivers are suppose to go slower under less than ideal conditions. Less than ideal conditions include such things as limited sight lines due to weather and darkness, the amount of other traffic on the road, which includes pedestrians and bicycle riders as well as other motor vehicles, hidden driveways, condition of the road surface and condition of the car.

wsbob
Guest
wsbob

“…The speed limit in California is suppose to be the max allowable speed under ideal conditions…” bay area rider

My personal feeling, is that criteria for setting speed limits is, for many areas, very ‘old school’ philosophy that doesn’t not satisfactorily take into consideration, the effect on livability of cities and neighborhoods, roads regulated this way, produce.

That for years, highway depts and traffic engineers have been obliged to design road and streets for the maximum possible motor vehicle mph speeds, seems to be largely why so many neighborhoods are plagued with high numbers of motor vehicles traveling at speeds enormously out of proportion to that needed for basic neighborhood livability and street functionality by means other than motor vehicle.

For so very long in so many cities here in the U.S., it seems to have been the obligation of neighborhoods to try blithely accept, despite definite compromise to neighborhood livability, ever increasing numbers of motor vehicles traveling at maximum allowed speeds.

raphael
Guest
raphael

Barbur please

Todd Hudson
Guest
Todd Hudson

It would be nice to have one on East Burnside. Beyond 60th, even driver becomes Mario Andretti. Thankfully I no longer live on this street.

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

High crash corridors eligible for fixed photo radar:
http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/59277

rachel b
Guest
rachel b

I saw a Texas Transportation Institute study on Dynamic Speed Display Signs that proved they were effective in school zones. Another study (Morgan State Univ.) said the signs work esp. well in conjunction w/ the cameras.

Any chance streets other than high crash corridors–i.e., streets w/ schools–could petition for the DSDS/ticketing camera combo in the future?

rick
Guest
rick

It has been much nicer riding along BH Highway since the cameras were installed. Very thankful for justice. These safety cameras are needed on numerous SW Portland roads.

Carrie
Guest
Carrie

This is an example of why I think enforcement really and truly does work. I am truly listening to all the discussion and concerns about equity, but I also think that just enforcing the rules we already have (stop at stop signs, follow the speed limit, don’t pass over a double yellow line) will make daily transportation life much nicer.

rick
Guest
rick

I think the air is more clean when riding my bike along this section lately. It has made a huge difference since late August.

Spiffy
Subscriber

it would make transportation life a complete disaster for the majority of people because with the current capacity of our roads it’s nearly impossible to drive somewhere directly without breaking a law…

if all traffic laws were strictly enforced for motor vehicle users then we’d have hordes of them clamoring for public transit…

but we don’t have the resources to have a traffic cop on every corner…

I’m all for putting up cameras on every corner and mailing tickets to people…

Tom Hardy
Guest
Tom Hardy

With zero tolerance for anything over 10% over the limit.

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

Don’t forget: turn into the nearest lane, use your turn signals, actually replace your burnt-out signal lamp, don’t pass at an intersection, no tailgating. This is just one car from yesterday’s school run (which was also speeding and ran a stop sign as usual.)

El Biciclero
Guest
El Biciclero

Yes, enforcement does work—if it is guaranteed. The main problem with enforcement, however is that human enforcers have to be in the right place at the right time to catch violators. Unfortunately for some, the “right place” might be that neighborhood, where a disproportionate number of poor or minority offenders would be caught, while violators in other parts of the city are getting away with illegal behavior. Another issue is “officer discretion” about whom to cite for offenses. These factors mean that enforcement is usually a) somewhat unfair, and/or b) random and relatively unlikely.

To me, cameras can offer the best of both worlds. The “right” place should be based on concentration of violations, not on neighborhood demographics, and cameras have no discretion (although there is probably some human who decides to mail or not to mail a citation). So for such locations, at least, enforcement is “fair” and “guaranteed”, the best combination for changing behavior.

Kristi Finney Dunn
Guest

I was quite disappointed about the decision to not recommend more enforcement. Part of that was justified by the PPB notifying us at that last meeting that they would need to decrease the traffic division officers by five almost immediately. It’s more important to go after shoplifters and pretty criminals than killers on the road.

rick
Guest
rick

BH Highway needs to be 35 mph in this section. It is 35 in Raleigh Hills and east Beaverton. In fact, it is 30 mph by the Pizzacato at SW 107th Ave.

Spiffy
Subscriber

20 is plenty, on every city street…

JeffS
Guest
JeffS

I would be curious to know what the threshold for a ticket is going to be.

rick
Guest
rick

I think 51 mph.

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

Yes, I’m disappointed that the report says “violations” when they actually mean non-class-D violations i.e. less than 27% over the posted speed.

How about 31 in a 20 — 55% over the posted speed and 4x the chance of fatality to an unarmored person struck at that speed? Is that really the same as failure to signal? Please. Vision Only Mostly Dead.

Adam
Guest
Adam

Is it just me, or was the red car in front of the white car going pretty much just as fast?

The two vehicles behind were going slower, but that was probably only because they witnessed the flash of the speed camera and thought “oh s**t!!!!” to themselves.

I LOVE speed cameras. If we could have them on every block of every street, I would be in heaven.

That said, they seem to be a poor substitute for better roadway design. If you have a roadway that allows a car to drive 70+ mph, you really need to design it better. More stop signs, more traffic lights, and other traffic calming features.

That road is hideous. Try getting out to Blind Date at The Dairy on it. It is fast, wide, and has no safe crossings. There is one crossing at Shattuck, and nothing either side for like a mile. What people who take Trimet on this road are expected to do to cross to their bus stops lord only knows.

rick
Guest
rick

Portland is designing the Red Electric Trail to get to the Velodrome and SW Oleson Road.

bradwagon
Guest
bradwagon

I was initially excited about this as a route to get downtown from Beaverton but having thought about it more I imagine it will end up similar to the Fanno Creek Trail. Meaning it will be a nice leisurely route for dog walkers and families but still an inefficient way to actually travel by bike as a means of transportation.

Have said and will continue to say that BHH needs a road diet to allow for a wide separated bike track that allows for direct and efficient cycling between Beaverton and SW / Downtown. Eliminate the center turn lane and make a two way path on one side or eliminate a lane from each direction and have a ped and one way cycle path on each side… either way.

I am so tired of the 5 mile direct and flat route (compared to rest of west hills) from Scholls Ferry to Ross Island Bridge via BHH and Barbur being a ride at your own risk route. What could be a 20 minute ride with my family is a route planning and side street winding nightmare if attempted with a bike trailer and my wife (she isn’t too keen on the bike trailer being used outside of neighborhood streets and paths). I think many people would find 10 mile bike trips very manageable if it didn’t require using a maze of disconnected paths and side streets that took you an hour or more.

rick
Guest
rick

The Red Electric Trail won’t be littered with tree roots buckling asphalt. Many parts of it will be on greenway roads with 15 or 20 mph roads and some will have sidewalks.

bradwagon
Guest
bradwagon

I hope so regarding path quality but again, I would prefer to not have to wind my way through neighborhood streets and transition across sidewalks up onto a paths. This is just once again a subtle way to route peds and bikes through inconvenient, less valuable space. Why can bikes not be given as convenient and valuable routes as cars?

Adam
Guest
Adam

Also, how is it ‘traffic shaming’ as PBOT puts it, when the car driver’s face is blocked out, and the car driver’s plates are blocked out?

That’s not my definition of traffic shaming.

Show their licence plate, I say!

Allison Sliter
Guest
Allison Sliter

I bet that driver’s mom recognizing her kid’s car. And the driver too.

Spiffy
Subscriber

my first thought was older white male…

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

It’s not a citation in the first month, just a warning.
citations are likely public records, ask for data after next week.

RH
Guest
RH

Why don’t we also put ‘speed camera area’ signs all over the city (like other countries do)….even if a speed camera isn’t there? That would maybe help keep drivers on their toes…especially if the city did have a mobile speed camera van, etc..

rick
Guest
rick

politics

RH
Guest
RH

That’s what’s frustrating. Let’s say 50 signs @ $500 each installed is only $25,000. That’s a tiny amount for guaranteed safety and livability improvement. [sigh].

Chris I
Guest
Chris I

If the cameras were rolled out all over the city, realistically, you would only need about 25% of them to be real cameras. The rest could be dummy boxes that look the same and flash when someone exceeds the limit.

This program is fantastic. Enforcement only works if it is 100%. Once drivers understand that they can’t get away with illegal activities, they will stop.

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

RH,
Ever entered the city?
‘Welcome to Portland’
‘Traffic Laws Photo Enforced’

GlowBoy
Guest
GlowBoy

How is this Portland’s first speed camera? PPB has been using speed cameras in vans (aka photo radar) since at least the 90s, and I know I’ve seen speed signs like this a number of places. Or are those all in places like Beaverton, and this is the first permanent installation of a speed camera in the city of Portland?

rick
Guest
rick

I’ve seen ones around Washington County, but I don’t think they take a photo and give tickets.

Tom Hardy
Guest
Tom Hardy

They do Rick. The vans are also manned. I usually stop and say HI if I am on the bike. Sometimes it even wakes the policeman up inside.

Chad
Guest
Chad

In Beaverton they are manned and do give tickets. In Hillsboro the speed signs are advisory and often turn into a “competition” as drivers speed up to go for a high score when traffic is light.

Spiffy
Subscriber

yes, the key term here is “fixed” and not mobile… we’ve had vans, but nothing mounted to a fixed object…

soren
Subscriber

Because except for this small demonstration project unmanned fixed speed cameras are illegal in OR. Livable Streets Action and BikeLoudPDX asked the legislative transportation committee to legalize fixed speed cameras in Salem yesterday.

Adam
Subscriber

Looks like the camera is working. Please install tons more!

Charles Kim
Guest
Charles Kim

Its great the camera ticket system is working for that stretch. However, the camera system is quite obvious and will be effective for that one area. I can see people speeding up as soon as they pass the camera. It seems multiple cameras are needed to prevent speeding much like how speed bumps in neighborhood streets prevent speeding. Its a good start though.

nuovorecord
Guest
nuovorecord

I think some drivers will speed up, to be sure. But others will not and slow down speeds for other drivers behind them. Not a perfect solution, but until autonomous cars are the only vehicles allowed on the roads, this is a good next step.

Kristin
Guest
Kristin

Any news on where the cameras will be on Marine Drive? I rode the on-road section between 13th and 33rd on my old commute and the speeding trucks are terrifying, especially with the indifferent maintenance of the bike lane.

Chris I
Guest
Chris I

Ideally, there would be one every mile for the entire stretch. That road is an absolute nightmare. Just this morning there was a head-on crash near the airport with 3 serious injuries.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

paikiala: Do you know if the cameras collect any data on drivers who are not photographed for enforcement action?

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

Not for PBOT.
Not sure how the vendor would turn a profit expending resources that way either, or the risk v. reward equation.

danny
Guest
danny

Four little words: Barbur Blvd. next PLEASE!!!

rick
Guest
rick

Do the auto shops and strip clubs support it on Barbur?

Pat Franz
Guest
Pat Franz

How about warning letters for anyone more than 10% over, and require them to confirm their insurance? And corresponding notifications to their insurance companies? And go on their record, and the record for the car?

These “small transgressions” can either be occasional or chronic. I don’t see being able to do much about the truly occasional lapses, but the chronic abusers are ticking time bombs. As a society, we need an effective way of letting them know their behavior is not OK, won’t actually be tolerated, and has consequences.

As it is now, a chronic traffic law abuser really only comes to the attention of anyone in government when they cause a serious crash. And all the times they drove dangerously before that are completely invisible. The very big problem of people that regularly cause accidents and are allowed to keep driving (whether or not they have a license) still needs to be solved too, but there are a lot more less crash prone but still chronically dangerous drivers out there. We need to have some way of changing their behavior short of trying to sanction them after they have killed someone.

JeffS
Guest
JeffS

How about you just give everyone a ticket every time. The chronic vs occasional thing works itself out.

was carless
Guest
was carless

Wait, if this was the first speed camera, how did my wife get a ticket from this very camera on this highway last year?

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

time travel?

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

mobile van camera?

GutterBunnyBikes
Guest

Must be a fluke, because as everyone here knows enforcement never works.

(sarcasim btw)

Andy K
Guest

Can you follow up with PBOT on how the first week of real citations went?