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Multnomah County seeking rural or East County resident for Bicycle and Pedestrian Citizen Advisory Committee

by on April 28th, 2016 at 4:53 pm

The County’s biking and walking advisory committee meets monthly and offers feedback on projects and policies. Join them!

Multnomah County is seeking to fill at least one vacancy on its Bicycle and Pedestrian Citizen Advisory Committee with new members who live, work or recreate in Multnomah County. Preference will be given for applicants who live in east county or rural unincorporated areas. New members will serve a two-year term beginning July 1, 2016.

The committee advises the county on bicycle and pedestrian issues related to the county’s road system, which includes:
Major collector and arterial roads in the cities of Fairview, Troutdale, and Wood Village
Roads in unincorporated areas of Multnomah County including the West Hills, Sauvie Island, and areas east and west of the Sandy River
Five Willamette River bridges in the City of Portland (Broadway, Burnside, Hawthorne, Morrison and Sellwood)

Individuals who are interested in transportation issues affecting bicyclists, pedestrians and the disabled are encouraged to apply. The committee advises the county’s Transportation Division on matters that involve bicycle and pedestrian transportation, including project review and budget recommendations.

The committee meets on the second Wednesday of every month from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., typically at the Multnomah Building at 501 SE Hawthorne Blvd. in Portland. Members are appointed by the Board of County Commissioners and serve a two-year term.

To apply, individuals need to fill out and submit an application form no later than Wednesday, May 18, 2016. Applications are available online at www.multco.us/bikeped. To request a hard copy of the application form or for more information, contact Kate McQuillan at 503-988-0204 or katherine.mcquillan@multco.us.

County’s new courthouse could bring a raised bike lane to SW Madison

by on April 19th, 2016 at 9:52 am

court-image-riasedfinal
View of the new courthouse looking eastbound from SW 1st Avenue. Madison is on the left.
(Image: Multnomah County)

Multnomah County is planning a new central courthouse to replace the 100-year-old building they currently use on SW 4th Avenue — and it could come with a raised bike lane.
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County’s new mobile app tells you if the bridge is up or down

by on March 10th, 2016 at 10:40 am

bridgealerts
Bridge Alerts app screenshots.

Multnomah County has just released a smartphone app that will tell you when and if one of their four downtown drawbridges is in action. Yes, for the first-time ever your phone can tell you how to avoid those dreaded delays that always seem to happen at the most inconvenient times.

Here’s more from the County:
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Why does Multnomah County allow auto parking on the Morrison Bridge bike path?

by on February 24th, 2016 at 11:28 am

bridgeparkinglead
Not a parking spot. Or is it?
(Photo: Jason J.)

Have you ever noticed a car parked on the Morrison Bridge bicycling and walking path?

As one of Portland’s precious few pieces of physically protected, non-motorized travel space it sure seems like a bad place to park. It would be one thing if this was a rogue private citizen, but in this case the cars belong to Multnomah County employees.

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Advocate: County survey needs input from rural road users, not just residents

by on September 29th, 2015 at 4:25 pm

Family trip to Stub Stewart State Park-15-15
Riding on the County-maintained Skyline Blvd.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Welcome to one of the first in our series of occasional “Advocate” posts. These are quick, simple opportunities to get involved in making the Portland area better for biking.

Multnomah County is updating its wide-reaching long-range plans in ways that matter deeply to residents of the relatively few urban streets owned by the county government.

The result is that people who live on those streets — notably for bike users, Northwest Skyline Boulevard and Corbett in the western Colombia Gorge — have weighed in about the importance of bike transportation to the county, but most residents of the county haven’t.

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Multnomah County seeking bike/walk advisory committee members

by on April 16th, 2015 at 4:36 pm

Check it out. Good opportunity to play a role in local bike policy/project/planning. Press release is below and you can find more info here.

Members sought for Multnomah County Bicycle and Pedestrian Citizen Advisory Committee

Multnomah County is seeking to fill three vacancies on its Bicycle and Pedestrian Citizen Advisory Committee with new members who live, work or recreate in Multnomah County. Preference will be given for applicants who live in east county or rural unincorporated areas. New members will serve a two-year term beginning July 1, 2015.

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Dear everywhere else: This is how to do a detour. Sincerely, Multnomah County

by on April 2nd, 2015 at 3:13 pm

detour done right fb2
Service work on the Burnside Bridge Thursday, perfectly executed.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

With a few dozen orange cones and minimal fuss, a team of bridge inspectors and a county traffic safety specialist assembled a perfect Portland-quality detour on the Burnside Bridge Thursday.

It might seem like a small matter, but anyone who’s ridden a bike or walked near many construction detours knows how frequent it is for them to push people into mixed-traffic lanes rather than meddle with the flow of cars — even on streets that are far wider than they need to be for cars to keep flowing freely.

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Turnover of top traffic engineers will shake up city and county

by on March 12th, 2015 at 11:05 am

Cycletrack on SW Broadway-2
Rob Burchfield, who spent 16 years as Portland’s city traffic engineer, is moving to the private sector.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Two people whose judgment calls have shaped Portland’s streets for years — in one case, for decades — are stepping into jobs elsewhere.

Rob Burchfield, Portland’s top traffic engineer since 1999 and a nationally respected innovator on bike-friendly street designs, will leave the city on Friday after almost 30 years. He’s becoming the regional engineering director for Toole Design Group, a national engineering and design firm that specializes in biking and walking projects.

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Multnomah County car registration is down 8% since 2007, and isn’t rebounding

by on March 3rd, 2015 at 10:20 am

Sunday Parkways Northeast 2011-31-40
Why look back?
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

The Great Recession has left plenty of marks on the Portland area. Here’s one of the happier ones: so far, at least, a lot of the cars aren’t coming back.

The number of registered passenger vehicles in Multnomah County peaked in 2007, a review of 16 years of state records shows. After the economy began shrinking in early 2008, passenger vehicles per resident started a rapid slide, landing 9 percent lower by 2012. Finally, in 2013 and 2014, the local economy began a relatively rapid rebound out of one of the sharpest local downturns in the country.

But in those two years, the number of vehicles the average Multnomah County resident registers has edged back up just 1 percent.

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Comment of the Week: The slow, possible work of progress

by on October 24th, 2014 at 3:27 pm

Morrison Bridge bike-walk path dedication event-24
Ahh – can you feel that? That’s a successful
postcard campaign from 15 years ago.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

There’s nothing new under the sun, but effective political tactics have a way of staying effective.

That’s what reader and legendary bike advocate Phil Goff observed this week in a comment beneath Tuesday’s post about a series of postcard campaigns by activist group Bike Loud PDX:

This is exactly what I did 15-16 years ago to create the political pressure to bring in funding for the Morrison Bridge sidepath project. On two occasions, I had 300-400 signed postcards mailed to Multnomah County Chair Bev Stein (to get the County’s attention) and then 6 mo later to Metro Council chair Rod Monroe during the MTIP process. In the age of e-mail, Twitter and FB, a simple postcard campaign can pack a lot of punch. Its great to hear that advocates are reviving the tactic for other projects. Good luck BikeLoudPDX!

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