Advocacy Archives

New Ride Report app gives ordinary Portlanders the power to evaluate streets

Posted on September 11th, 2015 at 4:12 pm.

ride report map
A map of more stressful and less stressful bike routes,
created by Ride Report beta testers. Knock CEO
William Henderson warns that there’s not enough
data yet to draw conclusions.
(Image: Ride Report)

Everybody who bikes in Portland has opinions about the best and worst streets to bike on. But there’s no clear way to combine those opinions into the sort of information that officials can actually use.

Enter the new mobile app that’s currently available only in Portland: Ride Report.

Launched as an iPhone app this week (with an Android version in the works), Ride Report provides an extremely simple way for users to answer a single question about each bike ride they take: Thumbs up or thumbs down?


Wonk Night recap: Calls for a coalition and more cooperation

Posted on July 24th, 2015 at 3:45 pm.


(Photo: Armando Luna)

Special thanks to Lancaster Engineering for hosting and to Omission Beer for donating drinks.

You know that point in a relationship when something starts feeling a bit off and you’re like, “Baby, we need to talk.” That’s how I’ve been feeling about the bike advocacy scene here in Portland. And that’s why I figured it was time to get some people together to hash a few things out.

We didn’t solve everything at Wonk Night last night and I’m sure people left with more questions than answers; but it was a great conversation and I think we’re all better off because of it.


Cully advocates focus on Latinos through families and community

Posted on July 21st, 2015 at 1:38 pm.

(Rosaisela Portugal (L) and Lucia Llanos (R) during a presentation
at City Hall last week. Lale Santelices with the Community Cycling
Center (center) acted as interpreter.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Para leer esta historia en español, traducio por Google, haga clic aquí.

At the Bureau of Transportation’s monthly “Lunch and Learn” sessions last week, I heard from Rosaisela Portugal and Lucia Llanos — two women working to get more people on bikes in the Cully neighborhood.

Portugal and Llanos are part of Andando en Bicicletas en Cully (ABC), a relatively new group that first came to life in 2009 but really got their feet beneath them in 2012.

Now, with several years of successful programs and rides under their belts, ABC seems to be hitting their stride. So much so, that leaders from the group like Portugal and Llanos are eager to spread the word and share what they’ve learned.


After two deaths this month, advocates want stronger Vision Zero commitment from City Hall

Posted on June 16th, 2015 at 11:59 am.


Portland based walking advocacy group Oregon Walks has just released a statement following the death of two innocent people in the past two weeks — Thomas Gazzola and George Carlson — who were killed while walking on local streets.

Their statement, which is co-signed by 10 partner organizations and one individual (see full list below*), directly calls out Portland Mayor Charlie Hales saying, “We need action now… we must take bold steps immediately to protect those who walk on our street.”


City files motion to dismiss River View land use case

Posted on April 21st, 2015 at 10:11 am.

Riding and working at Riverview property-3
Photo taken in August 2012,
before biking was illegal.
(Photo J. Maus/BikePortland)

The City of Portland says the State Land Use Board of Appeals has no jurisdiction over its decision to prohibit bicycling on trails at River View Natural Area.

In a “motion to dismiss” filed on April 13th (which we obtained through a public records request, PDF here), Chief Deputy City Attorney Kathryn Beaumont argues that Commissioners Amanda Fritz and Nick Fish acted within their “managerial discretion” when they informed the community via a letter on March 2nd that bicycling would no longer be allowed on the 146 acre parcel.

The decision shocked riders and biking advocates. People have been riding the trails at River View for decades. And, following its purchase by the City of Portland in 2011, advocates were working in partnership with the Portland Parks & Recreation and Environmental Services bureaus on a management and trails plan under the assumption that bicycle trails would be allowed. The Northwest Trail Alliance, a Portland-based non-profit that builds, maintains and promotes off-road bike trails, responded by filing a Notice of Intent to Appeal with the State Land Use Board of Appeals on March 23rd.


‘Bike Week’ is start of something big in outer east Portland

Posted on March 24th, 2015 at 1:49 pm.

East Portland street scenes-3
There’s reason for hope.
(Photo J Maus/BikePortland)

This week is Bike Week in east Portland’s Rosewood neighborhood and it’s also the launch of the much-needed cycling spark that east Portlanders have been waiting for.

As we learned first-hand back in June, once you cross over I-205 on a bike everything changes. There are no longer bike shops on every other corner, the streets feel a lot less welcoming, and you suddenly feel like a fish with no school to swim with.


River View bike ban: NW Trail Alliance takes legal action against City of Portland – UPDATED

Posted on March 24th, 2015 at 12:08 am.


The Portland-based non-profit Northwest Trail Alliance has decided to take legal action in response to the City of Portland’s decision to ban bicycling in the River View Natural Area. Yesterday, the group filed a Notice of Intent to Appeal with the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals (PDF).


Hundreds to attend ride to protest River View bike ban

Posted on March 11th, 2015 at 8:55 am.

These shirts will be available at the ride.
(Design by Charlie Sponsel)

Update 3/12 at 5:30 pm: This ride was originally named the “River View Freedom Ride” but after hearing concerns from the community that the name co-opted important civil rights era history, the organizers decided to change the name to River View Protest Ride.

Portlanders are livid at the recent decision by Commissioners Amanda Fritz and Nick Fish to ban bicycling at River View Natural Area.

In response, 259 people (so far) have said they plan to attend the “Freedom Ride” that’s planned for March 16th — the first day of the new ban.

The ride is being organized by Charlie Sponsel, a member of the Parks bureau’s River View Natural Area Technical Advisory Committee and a lifelong bike rider who has used the trails inside River View for many years. Sponsel graduated from Lewis & Clark College (which is directly adjacent to the 146 acre parcel) in 2013 and has become the leader of a grassroots revolt against the bike ban.


Parks bureau adds $350,000 Off-Road Cycling Master Plan to budget

Posted on February 6th, 2015 at 11:44 am.

Newton Rd in Forest Park
Plan now, ride later.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

2015 is shaping up to be a great year for off-road cycling in Portland.

We have just learned that the PP&R requested budget for 2015/2016 (PDF) includes $350,000 for an “Off-Road Cycling Master Plan.”

This is nothing short of huge news for mountain biking advocates in Portland who see the lack of such a plan as the last remaining hurdle to more local trails, building more pump tracks, and so on. Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz called for the plan one year ago and just last November the NW Trail Alliance started an online petition to persuade Parks to fund it.


Youth Bike Summit will bring Portlanders to Seattle next week

Posted on February 5th, 2015 at 9:44 am.

Youth Bike Director Pasqualina Azzarello
speaking at the 2012 National Bike Summit.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

If you think about it, there’s little question about which disenfranchised minority has the most to gain from good bicycling: kids.

A national conference for people interested in the education, advocacy and organizing of young people who are interested in bicycling is about to kick off just up the road from Portland.

The annual Youth Bike Summit has taken place in New York City for the last four years, but this year Seattle will host its first year “on the road.” Portlanders will be presenting on three of this year’s panels: one by publishers/creators Elly Blue and Joe Biel called “Making Change,” and one from the Multnomah Youth Commission called “Youth Advocacy Initiatives: Transit Justice through Youth Organizing” and one by the Bicycle Transportation Alliance and MYC called “Getting What You Want: Advocate.”

The City of Portland is sending Janis McDonald as a representative of their Safe Routes to Schools program.