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Checking in on the newly installed diverters on SE Clinton

Posted by on January 11th, 2016 at 1:39 pm

clinton-swerver

They’re in (mostly).
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Over the weekend the City of Portland began their project to discourage people from driving on Southeast Clinton street and restore it as a true “neighborhood greenway” where bicycling is comfortable, safe, and prioritized.

There is now a new lane configuration on SE 34th (a north-south bikeway that feeds into Clinton), a semi-diverter at SE 32nd, and a full median diverter in place (but not finished) at SE 17th. After seeing reports about the diverters over the weekend, I rolled out this morning to get a closer look.

New bike lane and one-way configuration of Southeast 34th

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-25

View north from Clinton toward Division. There used to be no striping and on-street parking on both sides of the street.
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Looking north just south of Division where bike lane begins. (Hi Timur!)
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Riding southbound on 34th just before Clinton.

More than two years after 34th Avenue resident Mark Zahner began collecting signatures and support from the neighborhood, PBOT has made his dream come true. While the City balked at first, the rising tide of discontent about biking conditions on Clinton seem to have raised this boat as well.

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-39

Mark Zahner made it happen.

34th is between Division and Clinton and it’s a key north-south bikeway connector to Clinton Street. The trouble was, it was so narrow — with on-street parking on both sides — that riding on it was a gauntlet and it was impossible for two people to drive down it simultaneously in opposite directions without havoc ensuing. PBOT has now fixed that issue by turning it into one-way only northbound (away from Clinton) for drivers and two-way for people riding bikes. There’s a bike lane in the southbound direction and a shared lane (with sharrows) in the northbound direction. PBOT heroically re-allocated space previously used to store people’s cars in order to make room for the bike-only lane.

I walked the road with Zahner this morning. “I’m thrilled. I love it!” he said. Zahner said the new configuration has made “everything move better” on the street.

But Zahner and other volunteer activists with BikeLoudPDX, the upstart group whose on-street actions and City Hall letter-writing campaign spurred this project, say there are still some big issues to resolve. Instead of taking the bike lane all the way to Division and preventing people from turning down the one-way street, PBOT decided to not start the bike lane or the “Wrong Way” signage until 50-60 feet south of Division. This means people are still turning south, then getting confused and awkwardly turning around or just barrelling illegally down the street anyway.

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-27

This person was trying to turn around after realizing too late the street was now closed to driving in southbound direction.
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Another victim of the poor design that leads you down a street that is suddenly closed.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-38

Why would PBOT do this? We’re still not sure, but it’s worth noting that a restaurant (Sen Yai Noodles) on the corner of Division and 34th (owned by non other than famed foodie Andy Ricker who you might recall from our parking story in November) has three new parking spaces accessible by a very long driveway on 34th. The bike lane begins where that driveway ends. Making matters worse, Zahner says delivery trucks park on the driveway and completely block the new bike lane.

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-37

View south on 34th from Division (the Sen Yai Noodles driveway is on the lower right).
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-30

Looking toward Division with the long driveway and parking lot of Sen Yai Noodles on the left.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-32

Three new parking spots accessed from driveway on 34th.
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Another view of the parking lot.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-34

People are driving over the sidewalk and off the curb into the bike lane in order to access the parking.

The good news is that PBOT is aware of these issues and they’re already working with activists to come up with a fix. Stay tuned.

Semi-diverter at SE 32nd

When I saw one local TV news station report “confusion” about the pair of semi-diverters installed at 32nd, I assumed it was just unfortunate framing. When I saw a second TV station also use the word “confusion” in their headline, I figured they might be onto something. Unfortunately, their headlines are warranted.

Any new traffic control design will take a while to get used to, but in this case PBOT has simply not deployed a very good design from the get-go.

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-16

Only 21 percent of bike riders did what this guy is doing. That is, go through the diverter to the right as intended by the design.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-5

Only 21 percent of bike riders did what this guy is doing. That is, go through the diverter to the right as intended by the design.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-12

This guy is riding into oncoming traffic.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-9

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SE Clinton traffic diversion project-21

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-22

This guy actually swerved away from the intended way through, only to turn into oncoming traffic.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-24

Not a shock that most people don’t want to ride this.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-43

This person drove around the diverter and is in the wrong lane.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-44

Driving around the diverter.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-45

Careful of oncoming traffic!

They’ve placed 10 large concrete drums (full of gravel) on each side of Clinton at 32nd. People driving eastbound are supposed to turn either right (south) or left (north). People driving westbound are supposed to either turn right (north) or left (south). People on bikes can continue straight through, and they’re supposed to stay to the right of the drums and pass through an opening on the curbside. The design in place right now however, does a very bad job of communicating proper behavior to both types of users.

Mark Zahner did an informal survey from 6:30 am to 9:00 am this morning. He marked down on paper what people did at the intersection. The results were not good:

  • 78 percent of bicycle riders (226 out of 289) veered left and went into the opposite lane of travel to get around the diverters instead of staying curbside.
  • 11 percent of automobile operators (15 out of 137) ignored “Do Not Enter” signs and drove around the diverters into the opposite lane of travel.

While I was out there, several people in cars drove around the diverters. Even people on bikes would ask, “Can I go through here?” And some of them even rolled up on the sidewalk just to be safe.

A Portland Police Officer showed up to monitor the situation and talk with a few of us on the corner. Even with her standing there and her car parked in plain sight, two people tried to drive illegally around the diverter. And to my happy amazement, Officer Pierce (I didn’t get her first name) jumped off the sidewalk into the street yelling, “Stop! Stop!” She made one guy put it in reverse while pointing at the “Do Not Enter” signs and yelling, “Didn’t you see the signs?!”. It was pretty awesome.

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-6

“Hey stop! Stop!!” yelled Officer Pierce.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-7

“Didn’t you see the signs?!”
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-15

Was great to have a police officer on hand — especially one like
Officer Pierce who knew the issue well and was sympathetic to
safety concerns.

Why are people not doing the right thing? For auto users, the signage isn’t crystal clear, and since this is just a semi-diverter, there’s nothing to physically prevent them from simply sneaking around the diverter. And for bicycle users, the pass-through opening to the right (near the curb) isn’t nearly wide enough. There’s also an unrelated sidewalk project with barricades and torn up pavement that makes the pass-through even less inviting. Another issue with the bikeway pass-through design is that on-street parking begins too soon. PBOT has only removed one space, so as you look at the pass-through you see a rear car bumper and you have to make a sharp turn to avoid it. There needs to be a lot more breathing room for the bike movement.

There’s a general consensus among BikeLoudPDX that the current design is bad. In fact they’ve already scheduled a meeting to discuss it and make some recommendation to PBOT (Sunday, 4pm on 1/17 at Dots Cafe on Clinton).

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-3

PBOT Project Manager Rich Newlands talking with BikeLoudPDX volunteers Soren Impey (right) and Mark Zahner (left).

And PBOT is already well aware of the concerns. To their credit, project manager Rich Newlands was out there this morning talking to BikeLoudPDX volunteers. The fixes should be simple, but it’s a shame this design was ever left on the street. Even if this project is technically only temporary, first impressions matter and we deserve more well thought-out, safe, and intuitive street designs from the get-go. People should never be guinea pigs.

We look forward to reporting on some changes soon. PBOT said they’d re-assess the diverters this summer; but as activist Betsy Reese told me this morning: “There are some things that can’t wait six months.”

Median diverter at SE 17th

Crews were out this morning finishing up this one. This should work much better than 32nd because it will be a full diverter — meaning there will be a raised median island across all of Clinton forcing people to turn right. But unlike 32nd, these are just short little curbs that are easily rolled over by most cars.

While I was out there today, one of the PBOT work crew members recounted a story to Officer Pierce that an angry man yelled and threw things at them as he drove by this morning. And we just got an image (below) from reader Andrew K. who said a guy in a big truck plowed right over the still-wet concrete just as PBOT crews took a cover off of it…

17-ouch

PBOT might want to consider something more serious than a small curb.
(Photo: Andrew K.)
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-49

This is how it’s supposed to work: Bikes go through, cars go away.
SE Clinton traffic diversion project-50

Overall, it’s fantastic to finally see this happen. We’ve been covering the concerns about too many cars on Clinton for years now, and these diverters — once a few tweaks are ironed out — should help turn the street back into the neighborhood greenway it’s intended to be.

SE Clinton traffic diversion project-1

A very deserving happy smile from Alex Reed, one of the founders of BikeLoudPDX.
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— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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ATB
Guest
ATB

They might consider a design like the one on Williams and Killingsworth. Still allows drivers to exit Williams if they live on the street.

Adam
Subscriber

Glad to finally see the diverters go in! Remember, PBOT is receptive to changes and tweaks, as this is intended to be a trial diverter. Often times, people here get labelled as “whiny” for complaining about new infrastructure, but even more so in this case, PBOT wants to hear your input. It’s okay to praise certain aspects of the diverters while simultaneously criticizing other parts.

Bald One
Guest
Bald One

Diverters which are porous to bicycles should be the preferred engineering standard in this type of application. They do it in Berkeley with just about 2 or 3 of those concrete cylinders spaced widely apart, letting folks on bikes flow both through and around them with no trouble and showing cars to find another way through. I don’t think they need all the extra structural reinforcements on this street….

Anne Hawley
Subscriber
Anne Hawley

I’m not seeing any reflectors on those big barrels. Am I just looking in the wrong place?

People driving big trucks over freshly-poured concrete barriers strike me as symptomatic of so much that’s wrong with Portland traffic – problems that simple changes like these diverters can’t address. Seems like an incredibly entitled mentality.

Having gotten those two things off my chest, I must say that this is still a big step in the right direction, and I’m pleased to see it.

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

The “do not enter” sign should be above the barrels. Drivers don’t know what yellow signs with arrows mean.

kittens
Guest
kittens

Love the creative reuse of old TriMet trash barrels! Reminds me of the greatness which was once the transit mall in all it’s original 70s glory!

Also would make a great canvas for some creative painting.

yashardonnay
Guest
yashardonnay

Many thanks to PBOT for finally putting these much needed diverters in place. I am, however, incredibly concerned with the design. As mentioned, I would like to see them use the Berkeley design. Use half the pots and spread them out so that cyclists have multiple channels to pass through as opposed to one narrow strip. Can you imagine what that’s going to look like during peak bike commuter times? Yikes. Take the leftover pots and place them on top of the new diverters on 17th. Also, let the community paint these pots and plant flowers on top.

kittens
Guest
kittens

Might be nice if BP included a simple map to help readers understand exactly where the interventions are located.

J. E.
Guest
J. E.

I wouldn’t say “There’s a general consensus among BikeLoudPDX that the current design is bad.” Rather, the general consensus is that there are some glaring errors in the implementation of the design that are easily fixable, but greatly impact usability and effectiveness of the diverter at 32nd as it currently stands. This sentence in the article makes it sound like we think the diverter overall is bad, and if that were the case we would have petitioned for a different design months ago. (Although I do think that having cyclists move to the right rather than the left as per the very similar diverter just 7 blocks to the east was an odd choice and could be considered a major design flaw.)

Pedal PT
Member

Rode through those today, and that black car being pulled over was right behind me, lol.. Reading this, I think I also rode the ‘wrong direction’ around the diverter on 32nd, whoops. Although it’s certainly not the perfect setup (yet), it’s a great first step in the right direction- and we’re glad to see it!

EricIvy
Subscriber

Not sure if this link will work, but it’s a video of a group ride yesterday. Looks like only one person took the legal route. I had a bike trailer so there was no way I would consider it at the 5ish mph I was going! https://www.facebook.com/jr98664/videos/10205233659856734/

We also turned off of Clinton at 17th, because of the narrow passage (for trailers because the concrete molds were still up)

I know this is an anomaly, and anecdotal, but interesting none the less for when Pedalpalooza comes around.

EricIvy
Subscriber

Also, a question I have is regarding the 4-way blinking light at 17th. It used to be a 4-way stop, but now only the north and south bound directions have stop signs (for cars). The blinking light will confuse some cyclists I’m sure.

Dead Salmon
Guest
Dead Salmon

Too bad they did such a horrible job indicating what cars and bikes should do at those diverters. Very inadequate planning.

Haven’t ridden Clinton, but I think a grid of bikes-only streets would be nice. I’d suggest a grid of residential streets about every 2 miles going N/S and same going E/W. Cars would have to be permitted to cross those streets but would be prevented from driving on them unless they lived there or were going to visit residents. The 2 mile number and which streets to include could be modified to suit realities on the ground. The down side would be that adjacent streets would see an increase in car traffic. Would not want to do it to streets with lots of businesses. AND the intersections would still be hazardous to cyclists – probaby best to have traffic lights at intersections.

I’ve done the design for you – now get the government to build it.

Paul Atkinson
Guest
Paul Atkinson

From my saddle this morning…

My usual route links me up with Clinton at either 26th or 21st; this morning I went out of my way to use 41st northbound to Clinton in order to see the new diverters in action.

The intersection at 34th definitely needs improvement. I was among those who took the oncoming traffic lane without hesitation, because the path to the right looked inhospitable. I’m not surprised auto drivers are reacting poorly, as the signage is not immediately clear. I’m pretty sure we can do better than what’s been done there yet. Nevertheless I encountered no car traffic on Clinton after 34th until near 21st.

As I approached 21st continuing West, I heard a car approaching from behind. I stopped at the intersection then continued quickly; I tend to ride fairly fast on that stretch. Despite my speed (on the order of 20mph) I heard the crescendo of the engine as the driver began a pass but the maneuver was aborted in the face of oncoming Eastbound traffic. Once that was clear the engine roared again approaching 17th, but as we were near the stop the driver again aborted passing. I’m a strong-and-fearless type, but I was definitely aware that someone behind me was more interested in passing than in safety.

I went through the diverter and…no more roaring engine right behind me. It was quiet and peaceful. I’m very happy that diverter was put there.

Todd Boulanger
Guest
Todd Boulanger

Re: Semi-diverter at SE 32nd:
Yes it was very painful [as a project manager on other NTM projects] to watch the various TV news reports last night about the Semi-diverter at SE 32nd.

Other than the concerns already mentioned about the redesign the other crippling issue seems to be project coordination with the separate (?) sidewalk project. The sidewalk and curbing work should have happened first, as anyone in the field should have foreseen that narrowing the bike slot by ~2 feet for concrete curbing work and repaving would force most riders to ride around the other side (against traffic) with the new barriers in place.

Sadly, these types of design and implementation issues gives NTM (traffic calming and active transportation) a black eye if left too long.

Todd Boulanger
Guest
Todd Boulanger

PS. I am glad that PBoT is finally addressing the need for more effective traffic calming/ traffic management for such as important route…though it should have been done in phase (5 ? years ago).*

*[I was on one of the competing design teams for the redesign of the Clinton Bikeway, but the then ‘powers that be’ wanted a “softer” approach focusing heavier on the “art” component…vs. our team’s approach, as we were told.]

Adam
Guest
Adam

They don’t look like diverters. They look like things you can just easily drive around. Kind of like when you drive around a car that is parked in the road. We’ll see. I guess.

Travis
Guest
Travis

Dude with the flare on the road giving away donuts didn’t help the scene. Riding down Clinton this morning in the dark I see a flare, oh must be an accident, oh just a guy with donuts…oh crap concrete barrels in the road! There was another person on a bike turning around thinking the road is closed. My girlfriend started to turn around and I said it was just for cars and we promptly went to the LEFT of the diverter. Good times this morning.

RH
Guest
RH

It would be interesting to see a follow up in a week to see how things are going.

Lenny Anderson
Subscriber
Lenny Anderson

I was on the Tillamook Bikeway advisory committee in the 90’s and one of the reasons we put it on Tillamook was that wonderful diverter at 16th. It was put in by residents, and it makes a huge difference. Nevertheless Tillamook is subject to lots of auto “cheaters.” But the sky has not fallen in Irvington. Why not more of these style diverters on Greenways!? They are clear and offer straight forward directions to motorized vehicles.

q`Tzal
Guest
q`Tzal

First: look at the 2nd photo again of the one-way configuration on SE 34th.

Notice the trash containers on the left in the contraflow bike lane.

So I’m basing this on my limited (Aloha) knowledge of the Portland metro’s residential trash collection trucks but I suspect that they will have to drive this segment the wrong way to get residents trash.

Maybe the robotic trash can grabber arms can reach on both sides but I have a nasty feeling that they are designed for curbside collection on “normal” roads.

John Liu
Guest
John Liu

Remove every other barrel. Paint them with retro reflective paint or attach large reflective panels. Adjust signage. Then see how it works.

If drivers insist on illegally and dangerously squeezing around the diverters, I hope PBOT has alternative designs ready. A Tillamook-style diagonal diverter, for instance.

I am curious, though, about the decision to use concrete barrels. Do they have drainage? Could some of the gravel be replaced with soil, so that neighborhood gardeners could plant greenery? As it stands, the diverters are, well, not the prettiest things.

Ted Buehler
Guest

Jonathan wrote:
“There’s a general consensus among BikeLoudPDX that the current design is bad.”
and
“The fixes should be simple, but it’s a shame this design was ever left on the street.”

Um, I think the 32nd Diverter is pretty good. If not fabulous. Speaking for myself, not for BikeLoud. And while we all have some minor issues with it, I think we’re all absolutely delighted to see it in place. It was a beautiful evening tonight up at 34th, with mobs of bicyclists stopping to sign a “Thank you note” to City Hall, and hardly a car to be seen. A huge difference from the scene over the last couple years, with bicyclists cowering in the door zone as a stead stream of cars pushes through.

The only problem with the diverter design is temporary — that PBOT was replacing the curb on the north side, and didn’t have bicycle arrows directing bicycle traffic to the gap on the right. Perfectly understandablt that bicycle traffic might go on the left, since that’s what they’re required to do just 7 blocks east at Cesar Chavez.

I was out there tonight, the two new diverters are working well. They need a tweak or two, but we’re confident PBOT can tweak them in short order. It’s a good location, a good design, and a relatively quick execution.

Thanks PBOT!

Ted Buehler

Ted Buehler
Guest

Folks, PBOT pushed this project through pretty fast, and did two diverters and one contraflow bike lane. This is big for bicycling. It symbolizes the end of bicycle stagnation at City Hall.

If you like it, and want to see more protection for bicycle traffic on greenways, send a Thank you note to Steve Novick, Commissioner responsible for Transportation. Or, if you have other comments, be sure to let him know what you think.

Novick’s contact info:
novick@portlandoregon.gov
https://www.portlandoregon.gov/novick/

Ted Buehler

David Lewis
Guest

I’ll say this again:

Installing diverters on Clinton solves exactly zero automobile traffic problems, and likely will add to them on other streets. The unique bottleneck caused by Ladd’s Addition not being a grid and the rail lines going diagonal means that there can now be no relief from poor design on Division and Powell.

The answer is to offer alternative transportation options such as streetcars (conspicuously missing from SE) and actual bike routes, rather than what passes for a greenway in the US such as Clinton. Until ordinary people have real options other than private automobiles, the problems will only get worse. Diverters don’t add capacity for cyclists or any other mode.

Bike activists mean well, but are not doing the work selflessly. Portland is dotted with small victories from activists over the years, and I would prefer to see comprehensive policy changes over hyperlocal boondoggles.

Clark in Vancouver
Guest
Clark in Vancouver

Dead Salmon
I think a grid of bikes-only streets would be nice. I’d suggest a grid of residential streets about every 2 miles going N/S and same going E/W. Cars would have to be permitted to cross those streets but would be prevented from driving on them unless they lived there or were going to visit residents.

This is a great idea. According to David Hembrow primary cycle routes should be no more than 750 Metres apart. This is just under half a mile. Fitting into Portland’s street grid, that would be from 7 to 10 blocks apart.
Vancouver’s cycle routes vary in how far apart they are. I notice that cycling is higher and more a normal part of life in the places where they are closer so having more of them in an area makes a difference.

Clark in Vancouver
Guest
Clark in Vancouver

This is great to see it starting. This is the time to take lots of notes and give the city lots of feedback so they know what’s working and what isn’t and why. (Also lots of praise for doing this.)

J_R
Guest
J_R

The road rage being exhibited by motorists is increasing daily.

Just the other day I saw a motorist flashing his lights angrily at the motorist ahead of him simply because the motorist in front was slowing to make a right turn. There was absolutely nothing in the front motorist’s behavior or actions that was questionable. The trailing motorist was upset by someone else inconveniencing him.

Driving over a just completed curb and driving across the planting strip and curb are indications of how bad things are getting.

The minimum levels enforcement, low fines, and absence of meaningful penalties will allow this behavior to increase.

ethan
Guest
ethan

Who’s bright idea was it to block half the bike lanes with sidewalk construction? Couldn’t the diverters been pushed back slightly to allow for a better install with fewer issues?

Or, perhaps they could have fixed the sidewalks on Clinton while they were doing the sidewalks on Division. Either way, not very much forethought went into this, even with the ~7 months of delay already.

Scott H
Guest
Scott H

It only takes fives minutes to witness a car circumvent the diverters on 17th, I just watched someone turn right, pull a u-turn 20 feet past the diverter and turn right again to continue down Clinton. PPB needs to enforce the diverter immediately, unannounced, with no warnings.

tyler
Guest

Poorly implemented and designed “infrastructure” from the City of Portland is not surprising. In fact, it seems to be the design standard.

I’m still not clear why the existing center islands, already in place on Clinton, weren’t retro fitted with diverter spokes instead of these messes and why these locations were selected in favor of the more effective island locations.

John
Guest
John

Glad to see something happening here, but this is just the tip of iceberg of traffic calming needed throughout Portland’s neighborhoods.

Charles S
Guest
Charles S

I came through 32nd and Division (westbound) a few hours ago, and the arrangement of the diverter blocks had been adjusted to make the bike lane on the right of the diverter much wider (the rightmost diverter block had been moved back behind the line of blocks). So it seems the city corrected the design error very quickly.

There isn’t usually all that much car traffic on Clinton at noon, so it is hard to judge, but it did seem a little lighter today.

At 17th, I wonder if the blinking light on Clinton will eventually be switched to a yellow caution light rather than a red stop light. Now that bikes are the only through traffic on Clinton, it doesn’t seem like it needs to be a four-way stop anymore.

BeavertonRider
Guest
BeavertonRider

Awful awful awful. All three instances are design disasters causing only confusion and anxiety. Im both a bike and car commuter and I would have no idea how to navigate these areas. This is what Portland residents are paying for??

was carless
Guest
was carless

Wow. Yes, those concrete tubes might actually work. Looks like PBOT has learned valuable lessons from the plastic bollards!

More attractive permanent barriers can be seen in Irvington, in the form of extended curbs + planted medians with trees and sidewalks.

Mark Smith
Guest
Mark Smith

A sign stating “roads closed to cars” might have been useful.

peejay
Guest
peejay

“There needs to be a lot more breathing room for the bike movement.”

That says it all, Jonathan.

Keegan
Subscriber
Keegan

How can I request a police presence on E Ankeny from 6th to 12th? 30 year old white guy in a truck revved his engine as I headed down ankeny and followed me aggressively after turning behind me. Almost hit an oncoming car as he passed me just before Nong’s. I’ve had repeated problems on the stretch, especially from cars that try to cross ankeny without looking up the hill.

SENeighbor
Guest
SENeighbor

As a member of the neighborhood I have no problem with the divider at 17th it’s only a mild inconvenience, but removing the stop sign at 17th seems dangerous. I understand the intention of not wanting cyclists to have to lose momentum (I get it I hate stops when I ride), but with the flashing lights most cars still haven’t caught on to the radical change in traffic pattern and assume it’s still a four-way (especially if they only ever take 17th and never Clinton). Add to that the fact that 17th used to be the safe place in the neighborhood to cross the greenway. Now no matter where they cross no matter how safe they’re trying to be neighbors have to contend with cyclists riding their fastest, on a dark road, not looking out for cross traffic, with parallel parked cars and trees obstructing their view.

Slug
Guest
Slug

I was entertained watching a smart car squeeze through the diveters at 17th earlier this evening. I think the diverters are great despite the small amount of confusion.

Clark in Vancouver
Guest
Clark in Vancouver

From my experience, whenever something new like this happens there’s a period of time where aggressive drivers go to the place and intimidate people biking. This dies down after a few weeks though.
Overall this is great. Once the new equilibrium of the area settles down you’ll find this so much nicer to ride down and the people living there will find it nicer to live there.