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Portland’s next great bike neighborhood may be its most unexpected triumph yet

Posted by on July 8th, 2015 at 2:41 pm

the district lead image

The Lloyd, waiting to be born. City of Portland Archives: A2012-005, April 24, 1964.

This is the first in a three-part series made possible by Hassalo on Eighth.

At first glance, the changes sweeping across the Lloyd District right now look like a story Portland has told at least twice before.

Developer makes big bet on underused land near downtown. Residential towers shoot up. Amenities multiply. Streetcar whistles through. Bikes roll in by the hundreds and eventually the thousands.

But the true story of the Lloyd District, though it’s still being written, isn’t actually like that of the Pearl or South Waterfront before it.

It’s far stranger — and far more important for the rest of the world to understand.

As the first in a flurry of huge planned or proposed apartment buildings opens to residents this month in the Lloyd District, BikePortland is doing something new, too: we’re publishing a three-part series, told over the next six weeks, about the past, present and future of a neighborhood that could one day be the single most important hub of bicycling in the United States.

It’s easy to explain why the Lloyd has so much potential: unlike either of its predecessors, the Lloyd is poised to add thousands of residential units right in the middle of the country’s largest grid of connected bikeways.

bike score heat map

In 2013, Walkscore.com raised eyebrows by calculating that the Lloyd District was Portland’s most bikeable neighborhood. Two years later, what made sense then only in theory seems on course to eventually become the reality on the ground.

“I think the city kind of missed the ball on biking in the Pearl,” said Iain MacKenzie, a Northwest Portland resident who publishes the website NextPortland.com about urban development. “Bicycling is a lot more on everybody’s radar now, both the city’s and private developers’, than it ever was in the 90s.”

The Lloyd District seems likely to become the most bike-oriented high-rise neighborhood in the United States.

Bike infrastructure in the Lloyd has a long way to go. We’ll be discussing the changes that’ll be needed in Part III of this series.

But here’s the bottom line: if current plans for the Lloyd District move forward, one in 50 renter households in the entire City of Portland will live in one of three new apartment projects, all within a five-minute walk of one another — and all within a 15-minute bike trip of the central city’s 135,000 jobs. That’d be just the beginning; if these projects are built as proposed, it could prompt a string of parking lots owned by Kaiser Permanente to become new towers of their own, adding further to the district’s impact.

The most remarkable thing about the Lloyd’s impending transformation, though, isn’t where the district is. The most remarkable thing about the Lloyd’s transformation is what the district is.

The Lloyd District was, 20 years ago, essentially a suburban-style office park with an auto-oriented shopping mall in the middle of it.

If Portland can continue seamlessly transitioning the Lloyd District from a drive-alone employment zone that rolls up its sidewalks at 5:30 p.m. into a beating heart of east-side street life, it won’t just have created the most bike-oriented high-rise neighborhood in the United States. It’ll have written a guide for how to build such a hub out of a sea of corporate parking lots.

“I’m incredibly optimistic about that area,” said MacKenzie, who said that the Lloyd is on the way to being maybe the country’s most important biking neighborhood. “In 20 years, they aren’t going to believe what it was like a few years ago.”

This series will tell the story of what is making this transformation possible.

The day everything changed: Sept. 15, 1997

Elwood_02 with bike

The car-free 8th Avenue intersects with a newly reopened NE Hassalo Street in the middle of the Hassalo on Eighth complex that opened its first building this month.
(Rendering by GBD Architects)

Before we explore the Lloyd’s history and future in the next two posts, though, it’s worth spending a little time asking just how successful the Lloyd District has been already. Here’s a good place to start:

Portland’s goal to quadruple bike use, triple transit use, double walking and cut driving in half between 2010 and 2030 has been described as unrealistic by many people, including Mayor Charlie Hales during his 2012 campaign. (In the next breath, Hales added that the goal is “ambitious” and “wonderful.”)

But that’s almost exactly what the Lloyd District did between 1994 and 2013.

“When we began in the Lloyd District, less than 10 percent of employees in the district took the bus,” Rick Williams, the founding director of the Lloyd District business association Go Lloyd, said in an interview Tuesday. “Less than 1 percent rode their bike and less than a half percent walked.”

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For Williams, it’s easy to pinpoint the day everything began to change for the Lloyd: Sept. 15, 1997.

That was the Monday morning when the Lloyd District flipped its first 1,000 parking meters into action.

“Our goal was to get 20,000 employees into the district. Not six, not 10. And the only way to get 20,000 into the district was we had to put up bigger buildings. And the only way to put up bigger buildings was to get away from surface parking.”
— Rick Williams, founding director of Go Lloyd

For people parking on the streets, it was a 35-cent-per-hour annoyance; for people commuting to work in the district, it was a $40-per-month expense as some employers began to charge, too. But in combination with huge investments in local public transit and a steady flow of biking and walking projects, the district’s abandonment of free parking set the stage for its redevelopment.

“Our goal was to get 20,000 employees into the district,” Williams said. “Not six, not 10. And the only way to get 20,000 into the district was we had to put up bigger buildings. And the only way to put up bigger buildings was to get away from surface parking.”

So, starting in 1994, the district’s landowners hired Williams to create a new sort of business association for the area: one with a mandate to break the chokehold that auto parking had over the district by improving the district’s non-auto transportation options.

We’ll explore this history a bit more in the second post of this series, coming in a couple weeks. But here’s a spoiler: the plan worked. Here’s a chart of the on-site parking at three major mixed-use projects, one in each of the city’s major redevelopment districts during the last decade. The first two were built in 2007; the third, the planned 980-unit Oregon Square project in the Lloyd, is going before the city’s design commission next month.

auto parking

Though the buildings currently going up in the Lloyd, just to the north of the Oregon Square site, have much higher parking ratios for retail space, that’s largely because the developer is trying to lure a grocery store as an anchor for the district. Hassalo on Eighth is setting aside just one residential parking space per two apartments.

Unless you count bike parking, that is. As we reported last year, Hassalo on Eighth is the biggest bike parking project in North America, a record that seems most likely to be broken by other buildings being proposed in the Lloyd District.

If these plans keep moving forward, the Lloyd District won’t be on its way to becoming Portland’s least auto-oriented new neighborhood. It’ll already be there.

oregon square

The planned Oregon Square.
(Rendering: GBD Architects)

Coming in two weeks: How the Lloyd woke up from its century of broken dreams.
Coming in four weeks: The bikeways the district’s advocates are lining up that’ll be needed to make this dream come true.

— The Real Estate Beat is a regular column. You can sign up to get an email of Real Estate Beat posts here, or read past installments here. This is a sponsored series by BikePortland. It’s brought to you by the bike-loving folks at Hassalo on Eighth, the Lloyd District development that is now leasing. We agreed on the subject of the series but they have no control or right to review the content before publication.

NOTE: Thanks for sharing and reading our comments. To ensure this is a welcoming and productive space, all comments are manually approved by staff. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for meanness, discrimination or harassment. Comments with expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia will be deleted and authors will be banned.

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grumpcyclist
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grumpcyclist

Michael Andersen: Your articles are frequently pro-developer and now I see why: you’re taking money from them. I’m really shocked that you guys are doing sponsored content now.

m
Guest
m

Sponsored by Hassalo on Eighth?

You are also asking for donations to “support local, independent journalism.”

Which is it?

Adam Herstein
Guest
Adam Herstein

Advertising disguised as journalism? I’d have thought this would be beneath BikePortland, but apparently not. Ugh.

gutterbunnybikes
Guest

Nice write up – Looking forward to the future write ups.

Though it’s different than the Pearl district, it very well might fall into the same pattern as the Pearl as far as transportation goes (where bicycle ridership numbers are falling supposedly). With everything a person needs within a 5 minute walk from the door, bicycle use might fall…But for all the right reasons because they are walking instead.

But even if bicycle ridership ends up below predictions, it’s still ends up with fewer cars on the road per capita which is always a good thing.

It’s stuff like this with the combination of the Tillicum and the upcoming Foster improvements that leaves me puzzled when people claim that bicycles and active transportation isn’t moving fast enough here in town.

Nick Falbo
Guest
Nick Falbo

Advertiser or not, the developments in the Lloyd District are a big deal and the story is compelling. Would you prefer they not share it?

Bike Portland has written articles on products from showers pass, ORP, Portland Design Works and other paid advertisers here before. We’re a small city with a interconnected bike-business scene – a little bit of overlap is bound to happen.

Todd Hudson
Guest
Todd Hudson

“a neighborhood that could one day be the single most important hub of bicycling in the United States.”

A neighborhood that has incredibly bad bike access to points south (especially gettingacross the Banfield), marginal bike access to the north, inconsistent bike access to the east, and dodgy bike access to downtown is going to need to fix those bike accessibility problems before it can be an important hub of bicycling.

Hassalo On Eighth spam in Bikeportland? Meh.

Champs
Guest
Champs

Qualifying household income for one of the shoeboxes in these places is almost $50k/yr.

Clearly we are building our way into affordability.

Stephen Gomez
Guest

Why the surprise that bikeportland is operating as a business? Every for-profit and non-profit news organization needs to drive revenue and there’s limited sources of potential income. Clearly, bikeportland readers don’t come close to supporting the work done by Jonathan and Michael.

The story is clearly labeled as “sponsored” at the beginning and end.
What’s important is whether the editorial content is impacted by the revenue stream–to my eye this is a newsworthy story, full of facts (which can be checked) with a good bicycling angle.

ethan
Guest
ethan

I like the new developments, but I dislike the speed at which Go Lloyd and PBOT accomplish things.

There’s still no 7th Avenue bridge, the bike lanes haven’t been restriped on NE 15th, bike lanes on Multnomah and 7th are full of construction equipment and 7th has narrow bike lanes that veer unnecessarily and are in a dangerous location near a parking garage.

Plus, dealing with the drivers in the area is super frustrating. I’ve had so many close calls, especially around Kaiser’s parking garage. It’s a cesspool of suburban drivers who don’t know / care that they block the sidewalk / bike lane / crosswalk.

Brian K Smith
Guest
Brian K Smith

I was a board member at Portland Afoot (Michael’s previous publication that merged into BikePortland) for most of its existence and am a close personal friend of Michael’s. The board spent three years trying to help Michael as he explored ways to fund journalism on important topics that did not have an audience willing/able to pay for the content directly or an audience that was attractive to advertisers.

Glance through some of the periodicals you still receive in the mail or online and guess, based on the number of ads for fancy cars/watches/perfumes/cruises/home remodels/restaurants, what target audience the advertisers are interested in. Then think about how many rich people want to read about public transit, urban planning, and bicycles as a daily transit option.

I can 100% guarantee you that neither Michael nor Jonathan are getting rich from BikePortland in general or this sponsored content package in specific. How many of you who are complaining about this clicked on one of the donation links/banners previously and donated something? If you did, did you donate enough to cover any significant portion of 1.5(+a little bit of accounting) full time salaries?

Journalism in general (not just local and independent) is struggling all over the world because the model of supporting a newspaper on the back of subscriptions, classifieds and car/grocery/department store ads has become impossible in the internet era. Sponsored content is the only thing folks in the industry have found that actually pays the bills and lets them keep devoting most of their time to bringing readers the information those readers want/need. If you don’t like it, please step up with some viable alternatives or just skip the clearly identified sponsored content.

As for the accusation that Michael is pro-developer:

1. He writes the Real Estate Beat column, which not too surprisingly often discusses the activities of developers and he tries hard to help his interview subjects (regardless of what they do for a living) portray their best selves. You may disagree with what the developer has to say and wish Michael had made them sound like an idiot, but I’m happy to have a reporter that would help me present my best self if I were ever the subject of a piece.

2. Michael is very much pro-density. Not blindly so, but I think he would agree with the general statement that higher density is a key factor in making non-auto transportation more viable and popular, which is good for the cycling community, the city, and the world. It’s very hard to talk about increased density without talking about the physical infrastructure changes that make that happen and the individuals and organizations responsible for those infrastructure changes. When they are doing so in a way that is better for cyclists in some way (as with last year’s story about the bike parking at Hassalo on Eighth), would you prefer that BikePortland solely complain about the flaws in the improved infrastructure or focus on the improvement and mention in passing one or two things that they’d love to see to make it even better? Which approach do you think is more likely to make decision-makers continue to make innovative decisions?

Kiel Johnson (Go By Bike)
Guest
kiel johnson

I would like to comment that michael is a pretty good writer. The piece has a lot of well written lines and is pretty fun to read. Nytimes quality writing. Informative, well paced, and ties itself up. Good job!

I also think that maybe “building the bike capital” is a strech, especially since the neighborhood killed bike lanes on 9th and Holladay, but it is only through a narrative like this that they will begin to change and see what an opportunity they have.

Glenn
Guest
Glenn

I’m fine with this appearing on Bike Portland, especially since it was identified as an advertisement. Let’s look at this way – Hassalo on 8th is making some strong statements about their commitment to bicycle transportation in the neighborhood, and that’s a good thing. Perhaps other developers will take notice and try to one up them. Imagine a developer using lack of car parking and additional bike parking just a few short years ago (hell, imagine it in most cities today). Michael is also getting some much-needed revenue for a site that has primarily been a labor of love, and a source that many cyclists rely on for news and updates.

That said, I would like to see Hassalo on 8th double down and commit some financial resources and political capital to improving bike infrastructure in the neighborhood. It’s one thing to build and market as bicycle friendly. It’s another to take it a step further and work with PBOT, the city and organizations like BTA to make the improvements that will create a district that they claim we’ll see in 20 years. You can trumpet the fact that there are less parking spots than most other developments in the city, but that was done because it is much cheaper and the city allows it. Take a share of the money you saved and pump it back in to more resources for the cyclists who you claim will be clamoring to live in the district.

Rob Chapman
Guest
Rob Chapman

I actually like the buffered lanes on Multnomah (ducks). Now if we can do something about the 12th/11th Ave area it would be magical. I feel like I’m rolling the dice every time I cross the MAX tracks northbound at the park. I’ve had motor vehicle operators pass me with less than 6 inches to spare whilst taking the lane there.

Buzz
Guest
Buzz

Biking through the Lloyd District today still pretty much sucks, so it’s hard to imagine it getting much worse…

Kyle
Guest
Kyle

I work in the Lloyd district and my office window faces the new building. I’ve watched this building go up and Ive read about the next two that are planned for the area. I really think the Lyod district will be transformed by these new buildings. There will be significantly greater numbers of bikers and pedestrians, not to mention bars and resturuants. The Lyod district is currently a Buisness district. Adding thousands of residents will transform the culture and its makes sense to put these apartments in given the proximity to downtown.

I do agree that there are issues with bike infrastructure. I bike the section of Lloyd blvd from the rose quater to 11th everyday. I think the number one issue will be left turns for the new residents in the Hassalo. It will be an issue for anyone wanting to use the steel bridge, going both to and from the city. It will also be a big issue at the intersection of 9th and multnomah, when riding east to west.

Ann
Guest
Ann

I’m surprised to read such negative views about biking in the Lloyd District. I worked there for 7 years, while living in Concordia. I’m a very timid bike rider, but never had trouble getting to work. I would cross Broadway and Weidler at NE 6th, or sometimes down at the light on 7th when traffic was thickest. The bike parking infrastructure is good, and getting better, I think. Lots of employer sponsored incentives for transit and biking, too, which I imagine this series will cover as well.

I think a combination of expensive parking and biking/transit incentives are important. My new job just south of the Lloyd has free parking and I drive alone a TON more than I used to.

Ann
Guest
Ann

Also, the commuter bar graph transformation is pretty amazing!

Clarence Eckerson
Guest

To the people who are concerned about sponsorships – good journalism doesn’t fall from the trees. It is not magic. Things need to be paid for. And I can certainly tell you I don’t know anyone in the activist community or advocacy journalism community getting rich doing what they are doing. Although some of us may in the end make a good living, many of us work 60+ hours per week, and much of our “days off” can be spent working anyway.

I have no problems with this. Bike Portland has been around for a long time. I’d like them to stay around. Unless readers want to pay for that, there is no mathematical formula that works. I’ll be honest, even at Streetfilms, there is a growing chance that it may not survive in to next year. I sure wish there was someone like the Koch Brothers to come along to fund all this advocacy and journalism we need to continue, but right now there is not a large pool of money out there. I’ve been at this for over 10 years, about as long as Bike Portland. But it never gets easier. Never.

Rider x
Guest
Rider x

I think the article is great. Thank you for keeping me informed! It’s been clearly labeled as a sponsored piece and that content is not reviewed or approved before publishing. Seriously. People can always find something to complain about. I’ve been living on the west side for 18 years and don’t ride near as much on the east side as I used to. I used to commute through that area from 1994 to 1996 as I lived in NE and worked downtown This article has piqued my interest in all the changes in that neighborhood and I’m going to take a ride over there soon to explore. Thanks again to the great team at bike Portland. I’ve been a daily reader for many years !

Dwaine Dibbly
Guest
Dwaine Dibbly

When I saw the article, and the “Presented by…” text at the top, I thought to myself “OK, self, it’s a sponsored article and may have a bias, so read critically.” And I did. THAT’S EXACTLY WHAT WAS SUPPOSED OT HAPPEN!

q`Tzal
Guest
q`Tzal

Played Sim City 2000 too much – envisioning the Lloyd Center Mall reborn as one of those tall Arcologies. Kinda a blend of Mall of America but more of a focus on providing residential accommodations for people that work anywhere nearby.

Still could be a retail and office park focal point but with integrated apartments the commute could be all walking and at times all indoor.

John Liu
Guest
John Liu

Good article on a timely and important topic.

If you complain about commercial sponsorship of BP, you should either donate enough money to support the site without sponsorship, or stop consuming content that you won’t pay for.

Way too many whiners here.

Mark
Guest
Mark

The Lloyd District would be the perfect place to build Portland’s first Dutch-style protected intersection. Street widths are pretty generous and density would support the investment.

Nate Young
Guest
Nate Young

I was surprised to see no mention of the EcoDistrict designation, one of 5 in Portland. Michael, do you think that has played a role in the improvements to date and to come?
I personally think EcoDistricts are one of the defining concepts Portland is exporting to the world (I also realize it isn’t really a new concept – though the systematic development of them may be.)
Having a neighborhood sign in to a unifying theme is a powerful first step and I think we can clearly it paying off in Lloyd after a decade of hard work.

Josh G
Guest
Josh G

All the hot weather has me daydreaming of sitting with my feet in the Oregon Square reflecting pool (in the last picture above)

rachel b
Guest
rachel b

OK. Was rightfully shamed into contributing to BikePortland. I’m embarrassed it’s the first time. Working in the arts I know what it’s like to have your work taken for granted and to toil your ass off for little to no compensation (and everyone thinking that’s just fine), so I’m horrified I didn’t think to do it earlier. Will make it a regular thing and you can call me out if I don’t, Michael and Jonathan. Thanks for BikePortland.

And now I can rant with a (sort of) clear conscience! I think what bothers me about this article is the same thing that makes me leery in general when we get to talking about development and Portland’s metamorphosis and accommodation of future residents here. There’s often, for me, an unnuanced, blindingly bright and boosterish ‘we’ve drunk the Kool Aid’ quality to the discussion that really turns me off. I feel sometimes like so many of the folks who move here forget there was an actual here, here before THEY got here. And it was a very good here! Not an improvement project looking for a makeover.

I understand it–idealistic people move to what they see as a better place and they’re ecstatic and brimming with vim and vigor and a desire to make their mark. So, like an overly-enthusiastic guest at someone else’s party, they want to welcome everyone. And don’t want to see (and often are impatient with) the strain and distress all this mass Portland love is causing the existing residents of what once was a wonderful place to live and has now, quite honestly, become everything I never wanted in a city: hot, crowded, traffic-jammed, pretentious, smug and expensive. My opinion. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. This less happy side of the story of development and growth hasn’t been talked about so much, here in New Portland, until lately. I’ve been glad to see more coverage of it in recent weeks, finally. All this sunshine gets me down.

I see the writing on the wall for Portland, just like everyone else. Unlike Michael, I’m not happy about it, though! Listening to/reading him and so many of the folks here on this subject makes me feel alien and lonely and doomed. So, I’m one of those who’s clearly never really jazzed to see a story like this, even as I appreciate the intent.

I recognize the value of knowing about City plans and development (I have to keep up on it fairly closely at my job). But it depresses the hell out of me to read about it every day. Oh, look: another apartment building is going up. Oh, look: another apartment building is going up. Oh, look: another apartment building is going up. Another apartment building is going up. We can squeeze more more more more more more more more more more more in! Truthfully, I think more more more people ruined Portland–ruin any good place- and I don’t look forward to more people, still, cramming in here. I honestly can’t fathom it. I don’t want to. At this point, I resent having to accommodate even one more starry-eyed dreamer’s achievement of their Mecca, that great tabula rasa and cure-all, PORTLAND, OREGON.

So, I look forward to the less sunny side of this story about the great terraforming and peopling of the Lloyd District. I’m not expecting anyone to agree with my dour view of New Portland. But I, for one, will miss the tacky Lloyd Cinemas multiplex and would take it over another thousand people any day.

Thanks for letting me rant here, BikePortland. And thanks so much for the exhausting, poorly compensated, dogged, determined, excellent work you routinely and faithfully do and the service you provide to the community, for free, Jonathan & Michael.

Throw some money at them!

Doug Klotz
Guest
Doug Klotz

I assume that Hassalo on Eighth and Oregon Square owners will lobby for the bike/ped bridge over I-84, like I heard the owner of two industrial blocks on the south side of 84 lobby for it today at City Council.

Rod Brake
Guest
Rod Brake

I appreciate this coverage and the understanding of the connection between urban development and alternative transportation. What many forget when they see all the bike infrastructure in places like Amsterdam and Copenhagen is that a big part of what makes those places work for bikes is that a lot of people live close to lots of destinations (aka “density”). There is a lot of demonizing of new development. New development in close-in, high-demand locations is always going to be expensive, but stopping this development won’t make things less expensive overall. In the long run, more development (and people) living in central Portland will do a lot more to make Portland a bike and walking oriented place than will naked bike rides.

Mark
Guest
Mark

Thanks, Michael. Since I work in the Lloyd District and live close by, and might eventually live in the District, your series is of great interest to me. To those that live and/or work in the Lloyd District now, I encourage you to provide GoLloyd with ideas for active transportation improvements, suggestions for change, etc. There are also activities that we (volunteers) always need help with. You can also participate in GoLloyd’s bicycle and pedestrian committees and have a voice that way.

chris
Guest
chris

In addition to replacing the movie theater with apartments, I want them to do the same withe the mall. I live in the gulch next door, and I have no use for that thing. Turn it into a neighborhood instead of a destination and cut-through area for suburbanites.

PdxMark
Guest
PdxMark

Almost all the harsh critiques in this comment thread are over the idea of sponsorship rather than the substance of the article. If there were supported attacks that showed errors in the reasoning of the article, great. But there aren’t. This article warrants alot of discussion about whether and how Lloyd could get to where it might, as described in the article. Instead we’re trap in a silly loop of rants about the ideal of journalistic purity and assumed bias absent any evidence of it. Come on People… Let’s get on the real topic here.

rick
Guest
rick

What a change.

Lenny Anderson
Guest
Lenny Anderson

A couple three more points that need to be made about the transformation of the Lloyd District: in the 90’s along with the introduction of paid parking, the Lloyd TMA (now Go Lloyd!), along with TriMet and key employers, began offering heavily subsidized transit passes to area employees. Most of the City, most of America, has free parking and paid transit; hence the common mode split in favor of the former. Flip those to paid parking and reduced fee transit and look what happens! Its easy to do, if you have the political guts to do it.
2nd point: MAX began running through the district in 1986, stopping at 7th Avenue, but the 4 block area that’s now the Hassalo project remained a giant parking lot for decades, until right around the time it was announced Portland Streetcar showed up with a stop on 7th. What is it about Streetcar and dense urban form in Portland’s Central City? They seem to go together.
Last, for the naysayers, surely you are not favoring blocks and blocks of parking lots in the middle of a city? Repurposing of vacant lots and parking lots on Williams, Division and especially in Lloyd District for living, working and playing is long overdue!
Michael, keep of the great work! (and let’s get that 7th Avenue bridge built!)

CIRCA Cycles
Guest

I live a few blocks north of the Lloyd district, and I’m really looking forward to part 3 of this series, which focuses on on potential future bikeways. Maybe that should be part 2 ; )

BikeSlobPDX
Guest
BikeSlobPDX

I lived in San Diego 20 yrs ago, and when they put a new freeway through the middle of town (below grade), they capped a couple of entire blocks and put a park on it. Imagine that over I-84 between 7th and 9th!

Mark
Guest
Mark

Michael – Will your future articles include updates on the N/NE Quadrant Plan? I thought the lid over I-5 was an intriguing idea. http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/52841

mh
Guest
mh

The most intriguing thing to me, as an ex-employee in Kaiser’s building, is the 3-year-old plan for developing their various land-banked lots.

I didn’t look at it closely enough to tell, but I hope the disintegrating garage adjacent to KPB is included, as well as the massive lot across Multnomah, and even the Grand Dental block. A dental office could easily be a tenant in a tower. The officially land-banked park on the south side of the garage block never quite feels public, so it would not be a great loss.

jon
Guest
jon

Everyone likes to bad mouth developers and paint them out as evil but it is developers who are building us a more bike friendly city. Almost all of it benefits biking by adding more density, urban residents and services in bike-able areas. Land Use goes hand in hand with Transportation.

Kathy
Guest
Kathy

I work in the Lloyd District and live in Kerns. My 6th floor west-facing cubicle window looks out on the future “Oregon Square Park.” When they start developing it, I will have to endure possibly YEARS of construction noise and when they are done, I will have my currently awesome view of the Convention Center and downtown completely blocked. But you know what? I CANNOT WAIT! (I’m totally serious, not sarcastic at all!) I get a FRONT ROW CENTER seat to seeing the redevelopment of the Lloyd District!! This is seriously awesome and exciting! This area is DESPERATE for something, anything, to come in and save it from total boredom. Parking lots, movie theaters, sad little chain restaurants, a mall. Its location and proximity to MAX make it PRIME for development. I’m so glad this is finally happening!! And I’m so very excited that I get to witness it all unfold. I can’t wait to tell people 10 years from now how sad this area used to be, just as I tell people how sad Division was when I lived there in the late 90’s. Right now, I can’t get ANY of my friends to come meet me for lunch because they all work downtown and there are so many more options over there and the Lloyd is well – THE LLOYD. No one thinks of this place as anything special. I bet come 5 years from now, people will be emailing me asking to meet me for lunch at the cool new place that just opened in the Lloyd. I have high expectations, developers, please don’t let me down!

Kevin Wagoner
Guest
Kevin Wagoner

Thanks for covering this! I’m excited to read more. I’ve worked in the area since 2008. I mostly commute by bike from SW portland, but do also drive enough. I’m totally excited about the changes I’ve seen accelerating over the last couple of years!

CPJC
Guest
CPJC

It would be great if this development took off…but so far they have not announced a single retail tenant for the development…based on a recent article they had “letters of intent” but no signed contract/committed tenant doing a build out.

9watts
Guest
9watts