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City wants taxpayers to finance $26 million hotel parking garage next to light rail

by on February 24th, 2016 at 9:36 am

rendering with bikeportland
An architect’s rendering of the proposed six-story parking garage in the Rose Quarter.
The viaduct on the left is Interstate 5.
(Renderings via NextPortland)

The city’s economic development agency agreed this month to have city taxpayers make an eight-figure bet that driving to the Rose Quarter area is going to remain popular for decades.

The Portland Development Commission voted Feb. 10 to borrow $26 million from one of its property tax funds to build a new 425-stall parking garage on public land between NE Holladay Street, Multnomah Street, 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue, across the street from the Rose Quarter Transit Center.

Fifty of those stalls would then be resold to TriMet for an estimated $8 million, and the other 375 would be set aside for rental to the publicly subsidized 600-room Hyatt Regency Convention Center Hotel that’s supposed to go up across the street.

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Powell-Division Transit Project in-depth: Bike lanes and bus lanes both unlikely on 82nd

by on January 20th, 2016 at 10:52 am

south on 82nd
A draft rendering of one possible design for 82nd Avenue with one block of “business access transit” lane approaching the right turn onto Division. Cars could legally use BAT lanes only to turn into a driveway.
(Images via TriMet)

The Oregon Department of Transportation says it needs to preserve five auto lanes on 82nd so the dramatically increased number of cars that Metro expects on the street by the year 2035 will have somewhere to sit during rush hour.

Should a new high-capacity express bus line through Southeast Portland run on the most important street in Southeast Portland, or 30 blocks away?

The question seems odd. But as Metro and TriMet ask the region whether the new “bus rapid transit” line they’re planning should run on half a mile of 82nd Avenue, here’s part of the subtext: In order to get permission to run the bus line on 82nd Avenue, project planners have agreed not to aspire to do anything for biking, walking or transit on 82nd that might significantly reduce the number or capacity of cars there.

In fact, even if the highest-quality version of the project currently being considered were built, buses there are projected to travel slightly slower in 2035 than they do now. Rush-hour travel times would rise to about four to five minutes for the half-mile stretch, up from about three minutes during the afternoon peak today.
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Metro and TriMet introduce bus rapid transit for Powell-Division corridor

by on December 2nd, 2014 at 12:54 pm

brt-elementsofbrt
Room for bikes?
(Image: From a Metro slide presentation)

Only in Portland would a regional planning agency host a lunchtime event titled “Bus Rapid Transit 101” in a movie theater with free popcorn.

That was the setting yesterday for a meeting hosted by Metro to introduce Portlanders to their Powell-Division Transit Development Project. The planning effort is just getting started and the aim is to create the region’s first bus rapid transit (BRT) service on a 15-mile route along SE Powell and Division streets between Portland and Gresham.
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Guest article: From Portland to Timberline Lodge via transit and two wheels

by on September 10th, 2014 at 1:44 pm

Larua Before Ride
Starting at Laura’s home in NW Portland, Laura (left) and Ellen excited to depart on their journey.
(Photos courtesy Jen Sotolongo)

[This story was written by Jen Sotolongo, a Clackamas County tourism development specialist. It first appeared in the Clackamas County Bicycle Tourism Newsletter and is being used with her permission.]
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As bike tourism takes off in Oregon, so do transit options

by on July 3rd, 2014 at 3:17 pm

For just $30 you can get 7 days of
bus service between Portland and several
destinations along the Oregon Coast.
(Photo: Tillamook Breeze)

As bike tourism matures throughout Oregon, its economic ripple effects are being felt in many interesting ways.

With more people seeking out the growing number of bike adventures being developed by both the public and private sector, transit providers are responding to meet a growing demand for car-free tourism. This demand is growing because for many people, having to drive a car to their riding destination is a major buzzkill, if not a deal-breaker altogether.

Fortunately, we’ve noticed a growing number of developments in bike/transit options that allow people to access destinations they could never (or don’t want to) reach by leg-power alone.
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Skamania County’s bike-friendly transit to the Gorge expands to weekends

by on April 28th, 2014 at 10:35 am

Policymakers Ride - Gorge Edition-71
Starting May 1, you’ll have transit access to
Cascade Locks seven days a week.
(Photo J. Maus/BikePortland)

As bike tourism booms in and around Mt. Hood and the Columbia River Gorge areas, there’s a growing interest in transit service. With a reliable way to integrate transit into a bike trip, people can reach destinations that are further away and complete longer loops — all without the hassle and expense of using a car.

Earlier this year we reported on new bus service in Sandy that offers access to Timberline and other Mt. Hood destinations. Now a transit option on the Washington side of the river is set to expand, offering great promise for people looking to access the Gorge, Cascade Locks and more.
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“We’re all in this together”: A Q & A with transit activist Jonathan Ostar

by on February 10th, 2012 at 11:22 am

Executive Director of OPAL, Jonathan Ostar, photographed at the Active Transportation debate on Monday night.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

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Bikes, cars, trains: What’s the best value for taxpayers?

by on April 11th, 2011 at 1:13 pm

This guest post is by Michael Andersen of Portland Afoot, a “10-minute newsmagazine” and wiki about low-car life in Portland.

How much do various types of transportation projects cost taxpayers? Here’s an imperfect, but startling, hint:

capital spending per new commuter (Portland metro area)

From 1995 to 2010, our state and federal government spent $5,538 per new bike or foot commuter in the Portland metro area; $18,072 per new auto commuter; and $84,790 per new transit commuter. (more…)

TriMet adds student’s “Bike to Transit Map” to App Center

by on January 31st, 2011 at 2:24 pm

Screen grab from Bike to Transit Map.
See it here

Our regional transit agency, TriMet, is a national leader at data-sharing and they embrace open-source tools. One such tool that they’ve recently added to their App Center is the nifty Portland Bike to Transit Map.

According to the map’s creator, Melelani Sax-Barnett, “It can display bike routes, transit stops, and transit routes at the same time, so you can find the best way to bike to your transit stop.” (more…)

Metro wins $2 million from FTA to study transit corridor on Barbur Blvd

by on December 21st, 2010 at 1:41 pm

There’s plenty of room on Barbur
for a transit corridor.

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has announced that Metro has won a $2 million grant to do an analysis of the “Southwest Corridor” project. The corridor would run from downtown Portland south via Barbur Blvd (99W) to Sherwood. This could bring major changes to Barbur Blvd and help tame the motor vehicle traffic on that street that has led to two high profile fatalities this year.

Below is a short blurb on the project: (more…)