Citing neighborhood pushback, city pauses key piece of 70s greenway project

We’ll have to wait. (PBOT graphic)

The Portland Bureau of Transportation says pushback from local residents on their 70s Neighborhood Greenway plan have put a key element of the project on hold.

The five mile, $4.5 million project is fully funded and construction of some elements has already begun.

One piece of this project many bicycle riders are looking forward to is the conversion of a two-way road through Rose City Park Golf Course between NE Tillamook and NE Sacramento into a one-way only for car users. This would mean bicycle riders and pedestrians would have half the road width to roll freely and much more safely without being disturbed by drivers. The design was planned by PBOT as a way to improve safety on the neighborhood greenways. Greenways by definition are “family-friendly, low stress” streets where bicycle riders and walkers are prioritized.

Earlier this month however, we shared news that some Roseway Neighborhood residents are very opposed to the idea. They felt it was unfair to have to drive a longer distance. One person encouraged others to try and sabotage a PBOT traffic counter to make it seem like this stretch of 72nd had more car traffic than it actually does. Their thinking was that if PBOT saw a high car volume number, they’d scrap the plan.

The local media even picked up on the opposition. Local resident (and noted ant-bike advocate) Terry Parker told KATU News that, “People are going to have to go around the golf course, cut through more residential areas, or go down to 82nd, which is already somewhat congested, and they’ll be going into school zones.”

But despite this, we got word that PBOT pressed on and decided to enact their plan. After all, traffic counts and greenway policies are in their favor, as data collected in May shows that only 831 people per day drive cars northbound on 72nd — and 65% of the drivers were exceeding the speed limit.

So when I heard PBOT had already mailed postcards to residents around the golf course announcing the project was on its way, I put the story out of my mind. Then something changed. Now the project is on hold.

A reader who lives nearby asked PBOT for an update the project on Tuesday and was told by a project manager that,

“We are currently on hold to do that work… After hearing concerns from the neighboring community, the decision was made to pause this planned work until a more robust engagement process can occur as it relates to this portion of the project specifically. This is to ensure that we are getting direct feedback and exploring potential options with the neighboring community.”

The reader who shared that email with me said he’s very disappointed by the news. “This section [of the project] would have been superbly transformative infrastructure and was arguably the most thrilling concept in the entire greenway,” he wrote.

PBOT says all other work on the 70s greenway will continue as planned.

“Coming on the heels of the threat to Broadway’s protected bike infrastructure,” our reader who lives nearby laments, “this development raises serious concerns about PBOT’s support of sensible and secure bike (and pedestrian) projects.”

UPDATE, 9/22: PBOT Director Williams has decided that the project will move forward without a pause. Read more here.


— PBOT has updated the 70s greenway project page. Stay tuned for information about the public outreach on this.

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Founder of BikePortland (in 2005). Father of three. North Portlander. Basketball lover. Car owner and driver. If you have questions or feedback about this site or my work, feel free to contact me at @jonathan_maus on Twitter, via email at maus.jonathan@gmail.com, or phone/text at 503-706-8804. Also, if you read and appreciate this site, please become a supporter.

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Jay Cee
Jay Cee
8 months ago

I think I’m starting to see a trend with the new PBOT director

David Hampsten
David Hampsten
8 months ago
Reply to  Jay Cee

Citing neighborhood support, city pushes forward key piece of 70s freeway project

Jay Cee
Jay Cee
8 months ago
Reply to  David Hampsten

Ha! Don’t give her any ideas!

Michael Mann
Michael Mann
8 months ago

A pause is disappointing but better than a No. I’m glad to see PBOT is collecting hard data on speeding that I would assume strengthens the argument for reducing car traffic and better protecting cyclists. I live in Montavilla and ride this section through RCGC at least twice a week. Car traffic is generally light, but there’s zero shoulder and I’d concur that most drivers take it too fast.

Chris Wold
Chris Wold
8 months ago
Reply to  Michael Mann

I also ride this road frequently and traffic is light. But, it also gets lots of use by pedestrians and cyclists — all using the road because there is no shoulder or sidewalk. I would think there is sufficient room on the north side for a side walk.

Serenity
Serenity
8 months ago
Reply to  Michael Mann

In my experience, pause pretty much is a no.

EP
EP
8 months ago

I thought this might possibly happen, but figured no, PBOT wouldn’t possibly do that! Some VERY vocal local residents are all up in arms and complaining about something that would benefit SO many other people. Especially with the planned Metro Rose City Golf Course Trail Project | Portland.gov..

Apparently, some early version of the plan showed a path/trail that headed east & uphill at the base of the hill where 72nd turns west & uphill. So there’s talk of this not being ADA compatible, which I didn’t think it needed to be? There are currently a couple dirt paths there that people walk on, and I’ve made it up with the MTB a few times. Adding a path there would be expensive with all the work needed to make it work on the hillside. Also, it still means there’s a road headed through the golf course/park.

Cutting traffic down to one lane seems like a no-brainer, caving in on this project will set a dangerous precedent for future progress..

Matt
Matt
8 months ago
Reply to  EP

EP, that’s a solid point regarding the Rose City Golf Course Trail Project.

According to the Trail Project’s website, the trail is envisioned as a complimentary component of the 70s Greenway.

As the Trail Project notes, “these two projects will combine to greatly improve livability, access, connectivity, and safety between the Roseway, Rose City Park and Madison South neighborhoods and improve access for people walking and biking to and from local businesses and transit.”

The 70s Greenway went to bid in 2021, and at that time, the northbound car-free lane was a stipulated aspect of the project. It’s stunning that in the final stages of construction PBOT has cowed to 11th hour hysteria.

EP
EP
8 months ago
Reply to  Matt

Right?! When you read the RCGCTP page you realize they make a better case for these projects than PBOT!

“The walking trails will improve safety, provide access to nature, and improve neighborhood connectivity. When complete, the project will provide ADA-compliant access in a location where currently there is none. 

The proposed trail and safety improvements at Rose City Golf Course are in tandem with another City-led project.

Portland Bureau of Transportation’s 70s Neighborhood Greenway improvements will connect directly to this site. This includes shared lane markings for people biking, a separated pedestrian path along NE 72nd Drive between Sacramento and Tillamook Streets, a refreshed crosswalk across NE 72nd Drive near the clubhouse and a new crosswalk across Tillamook at NE 72nd Drive.

These two projects will combine to greatly improve livability, access, connectivity, and safety between the Roseway, Rose City Park and Madison South neighborhoods and improve access for people walking and biking to and from local businesses and transit.

The trails will connect to existing paths within Rose City Park and the golf course. The project will not interrupt golf operations and will provide communities near the golf course a place to walk, jog, and connect with nature within a short walking or rolling distance from home.The project will improve connectivity through the site which is a ten-minute walk to the nearest Max station and a five-minute walk to the businesses on Sandy Boulevard.”

bjorn
bjorn
8 months ago
Reply to  EP

Part of the goal of closing the road going north to motor vehicle traffic is also reducing the cut through traffic using 72nd to continue further north, often as far as Killingsworth. Building a path is nice but it does nothing to reduce dangerous motor vehicle traffic on the greenway outside the golf course.

EP
EP
8 months ago
Reply to  bjorn

I’m in total agreement with you. This road should be fully closed to vehicles to reduce cut through traffic and reduce the number of vehicles on the rest of the 70s greenway. And then, build lots of nice paths and trails in the park for pedestrians and cyclists to enjoy!

EP
EP
8 months ago

Here’s who to contact to voice your SUPPORT of this project:

Commissioner Mapps:
mappsoffice@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-4682

Millicent Williams, Director of PBOT:
millicent.williams@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-2165

Winston Sandino, PBOT Project Manager for 70s Neighborhood Greenway:
winston.sandino@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-5767

Mayor Ted Wheeler:
mayorwheeler@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-4120

Jeff Wright
Jeff Wright
8 months ago
Reply to  EP

Thank you. I live in the Rose City Park neighborhood and will register my response.

Max S (Wren)
Max S (Wren)
8 months ago

Local resident (and noted ant-bike advocate)

This was a very delightful typo. Glad to see someone truly stand up for the little guys!

ETA: aw dang, it stripped my ant emoji.

Jack
Jack
8 months ago

This is incredibly disheartening. Portland needs real bicycle infrastructure or we won’t be able to get people to shift modes to bike. People who live on a street do not own the street. The streets are for all of us to share.

Ben Waterhouse
Ben Waterhouse
8 months ago
Reply to  Jack

No one even lives on this street!

Carl Marx
Carl Marx
8 months ago
Reply to  Jack

This piece of road is not going to make or break cycling in PDX.

EP
EP
8 months ago
Reply to  Carl Marx

It’s a slippery slope and this is how bad things start. Any of this kind of nonsense can ultimately lead to breaking cycling in PDX.

Joel
Joel
8 months ago
Reply to  Jack

I don’t cycle in portland anymore cause I’m tired of getting my bike stolen or constantly vandalized.

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  Joel

Sorry that’s happened to you, Joel. After 20 years I’ve only had a bike light stolen; I routinely don’t lock up my kids’ bikes and there always there when we come back. I’m tempting fate, though, maybe!

Foot Patrol
Foot Patrol
8 months ago
Reply to  Joel

I stopped driving in Portland after my car was stolen twice. Not worth it!

cc_rider
cc_rider
8 months ago

Dope! When someone gets destroyed by a car on that “greenway”, can we get a list of “concerned” neighbors so we can blame them directly?

Roads are transient. They don’t belong to the people who live near them and they shouldn’t get to decide to make them less safe.

PBOT is a dumpster fire and Mapps has somehow made it even worse. I’m not surprised coming from the guy who complained his neighborhood was too dense because he couldn’t park on the street in front of his house reliably.

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  cc_rider

So far it’s “Anyone but Mapps 2024”. I don’t want this dude hiring the city manager.

cc_rider
cc_rider
8 months ago
Reply to  Dusty Reske

It’ll be interesting. I can’t see Ryan, Mapps, or Gonzalez really wanting to just be 1 of 12 and not have direct control over a bureau.

I assume that Ryan realizes that he has no chance of winning the Mayorial position. My assumption is that Gonzalez is at least thinking about running. I wonder how much of this is jockeying to be the PPA/PBA funded candidate.

Arturo P
Arturo P
8 months ago
Reply to  Dusty Reske

LOL. Mapps is the leading mayoral candidate and unless Gonzalez runs, a “shoe in” to be mayor. Probably better to learn how to work with him than the alternative.

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  Arturo P

Elections are more than a year away, so who knows? An active campaign against Mapps can do a lot.

I haven’t seen polling on who is the “ leading mayoral candidate”; is that info available somewhere?

Watts
Watts
8 months ago
Reply to  Dusty Reske

I heard that Jed Stanton was by far the more likely candidate. And he’s the bicyclists choice!

Jed
Jed
8 months ago
Reply to  Dusty Reske

You can write in Jed Stanton, “the bicyclists choice”. The challenge is, if I win I’m going to need some good advisors that are willing. I always liked Joann Hardesty and Chris Smith, people like that. None of these sneaky snakes.

Bill
Bill
8 months ago

In the context of the Broadway debacle, this is worrisome, but absent other signals that PBOT is abandoning bicycle infrastructure, the traffic volume is low enough that something like advisory lanes seems like it would be a fine compromise.

EP
EP
8 months ago
Reply to  Bill

I had thought an advisory lane might work, but that hill means it would be sketchy with lots of drivers coming in too fast with limited visibility, both from above and below the hill. I could see collisions between cars and cars, and cars and peds, and cars and bikes happening because of the lack of visibility, especially uphill with the sun in people’s eyes later in the day.

idlebytes
idlebytes
8 months ago

The same thing happened with the Lincoln and 50th diverter and it still went in. I wouldn’t jump to conclusions that this is related to the Broadway malarkey. I do understand why it would concern people but almost all of these projects get opposed by enough people that PBOT does additional outreach to inform people and make some tweaks even after construction starts.

Nick
Nick
8 months ago

I live in Roseway and was really looking forward to this. Going up that hill is high stress on bike or foot. Also on a bike it’s tricky to make the right turn at the top without going into the oncoming lane, and from what I’ve seen of drivers it’s impossible to do it with a car.

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.5418348,-122.5917429,20z?entry=ttu

Screenshot 2023-09-20 at 2.35.29 PM.png
John V
John V
8 months ago
Reply to  Nick

That’s why it was so kind of them to provide this little section of single track!

Screenshot 2023-09-20 at 15-08-14 Google Maps.png
Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  John V

I always bomb that (once I check that it’s clear of peds) on my way home from Gateway Green. It’s a great little cut-through.

Hotrodder
Hotrodder
8 months ago
Reply to  John V

22% at the top of the easternmost path where the roots are.. I hardly ever go down it, but on my gravel bike I never miss the chance to go up.

BB
BB
8 months ago
Reply to  Nick

If you think riding that tiny hill is hard and turning right on a bicycle is hard I suggest you stick to your car.
Riding thru the golf course on that street does not require closing a lane.
Are people riding bikes that incompetent?
I ride it with a 7 year old.

EP
EP
8 months ago
Reply to  BB

Let’s do a test. I’ll go rent a big uhaul truck and meet you and your 7 year old there. You ride your bikes northbound up the hill on 72nd, and I’ll drive right up behind you revving my engine and then start honking as you ride up the hill. Maybe throw in some oncoming traffic. Then at the top we’ll take a survey and see if anyone was stressed out.

This has happened to me with my kids in a cargo bike. There’s no room to be safely passed on that uphill northbound lane on 72nd. Closing the lane to vehicles is the answer here.

Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  Nick

PBOT should close the uphill car lane citing this right turn as the reason. It cannot be safely navigated by an average vehicle.

Steve C
Steve C
8 months ago
Reply to  Chris I

Agreed, riding west on Sacramento today I had a car veer into my lane while they were turning right. There is no possible way to negotiate this turn in a car without either crossing the double yellow prior to the turn (extremely dangerous given the visibility issues created by the crest of the hill) or extending the turn into the westbound lane of Sacramento.

At very least prohibit right turns and add an uphill bike lane. Though they should just do what they had planned and remove the northbound car lane.

Jacob A
Jacob A
8 months ago

PBOT really on a roll with terrible decision making. I use this bike greenway a lot to get to 82nd Ave. The ride through the Rose City Golf Course is the best part of the trip. There’s so many beautiful birds and trees, and there’s so much silence.

pierre delecto
pierre delecto
8 months ago

ITOTS from earlier post:

Stay tuned in the coming weeks for more disappointing news: Rose Lane removals, Division median removals, the 70s bikeway, Halsey Overcrossing, and Portland Freight Committee term limits.

✓ — the 70s bikeway

Charley
Charley
8 months ago
Reply to  pierre delecto

Jeez, I don’t even want to read BP anymore. 🙁

Just kidding. Give me the doom scroll.

Michael
Michael
8 months ago

Mapps takes on a radically new version of Vision Zero: Zero motorists inconvenienced.

Austin Brague
Austin Brague
8 months ago

Once again caving into the bloody NIMBY’s! They don’t OWN that roadway. PBOT does.

dw
dw
8 months ago

Damn can’t wait til they rip out better Naito For(a couple of years)

Watts
Watts
8 months ago
Reply to  dw

I rode it end-to-end this evening at about 5:45PM, and saw nary another rider. Sad.

Fred
Fred
8 months ago
Reply to  Watts

I rode at 11am yesterday and saw more riders than I could count. It’s really easy to cherry-pick data.

Watts
Watts
8 months ago
Reply to  Fred

I wasn’t presenting data, but relaying an observation and the emotion it evoked.

Greatdane
Greatdane
8 months ago
Reply to  Watts

I ride it daily end to end in both directions, and usually see other cyclists. I’m kind of surprised you didn’t at that time of day, given you are probably someone who bicycles to some extent given your commenting frequency. Your emotion in response to your observation exemplifies an issue faced in gathering support for bicycle infrastructure and safety everywhere. It’s pretty clear many people driving vehicles simply don’t see bicyclists, even when they are there, and therefore don’t think we need more space/infrastructure for them. I don’t think it’s intentional or malicious on the part of most people, but I do think it’s a real thing…

qqq
qqq
8 months ago

I’m wondering how the SE Division St. businesses who protested the median are feeling as they see PBOT pausing this project based on neighborhood concerns, just a day after they saw PBOT announcing they were undoing the bike lane on SW Broadway in response to businesses’ concerns.

If they feel that the City doesn’t care about people in East Portland the way they care about those closer in, they’ve now got two more big chunks of evidence of that.

dw
dw
8 months ago
Reply to  qqq

One or more of East Portland’s city council members will win by running on a platform of tearing out the medians on Division.

cxhansen
cxhansen
8 months ago

These articles falsely refer to “Roseway residents.” Neither Terry Parker nor the traffic-count-gamer are Roseway residents. PBOT presented the plan to the Roseway Neighborhood Association and attendees were supportive of the plan. PBOT’s survey of residents had enough support for them to move forward. I’m trying to find out more about why this section was paused. IMO, it’s a terrible precedent. – Chris Hansen, Chair, Roseway Neighborhood Association

EP
EP
8 months ago
Reply to  cxhansen

Hi Chris, There have been numerous threads on nextdoor about the 72nd closure, maybe you’ve scrolled through them. But, to summarize: a few individuals have made it their job to come up with all kinds of reasons why this closure is bad and rile people up, followed with all the contact info for PBOT and the mayor and such. Maybe the complaints finally stacked up enough? Pausing a well-developed and vetted project doesn’t seem like a good precedent for PBOT to set.

cxhansen
cxhansen
8 months ago
Reply to  EP

100%. Thanks for sharing the contact information above. I naîvely assumed that we didn’t need a media or call-in campaign for PBOT to follow through on a vetted project. By setting this precedent, PBOT can expect a lot more noise on *both* sides of a given project. Is sorting through all that a better process than presenting to neighborhood associations and sending mailers to thousands of residents to gather systematic feedback?

Unless I hear otherwise, I assume that this is a political knee-jerk by Mingus Mapps. It’s consistent with his too-little-too-late objections to charter reform. If he becomes mayor and gets veto power, I think we can expect a lot of, “I had no idea what the city council was voting on and at the 11th hour I’m going veto it.”

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  cxhansen

Thank goodness, under our new systemthe mayor would have no veto power. The mayor would have a vote in matters before city council only to break a council tie. The mayor would no longer serve or regularly vote on city council.” (https://www.portland.gov/omf/charter-review-commission/proposedballotmeasure)

Eric Leifsdad
Eric Leifsdad
8 months ago

This sure is a weird method that Mapps chose to announce the withdrawal of his mayoral campaign.

Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  Eric Leifsdad

With a sub-5% modal share (and that’s probably generous), I don’t know if this is going to have as much impact as you might think. Most of my neighbors don’t care about cycling.

pierre delecto
pierre delecto
8 months ago
Reply to  Chris I

2022 cycling mode share: 3.2% — and this is after a whole bunch of people returned to work away from home and switched to transit and driving. Portland is uniquely awful when it comes to a percipitous decline in cycling mode share. For example, San Francisco now has a higher cycling mode share despite having a markedly higher percentage of people working from home.

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  Eric Leifsdad

“[T]he withdrawal of his mayoral campaign”? I don’t understand.

Randi J
Randi J
8 months ago

I think the issue is that here is Portland residents are seeing so much dysfunction in their local city and county governments in response to livability issues (homelessness, trash, crime, vandalism) that they don’t trust the city to do the right thing when it comes to transportation re-designs. The willingness of residents to accept changes would be much higher if we had a well functioning city. People are mad and don’t want to just accept what a failed city government says. Look at the protests on Division about the medians. Same thing. People don’t feel listened to and their tax dollars seem to go into the abyss. Until we can provide essential services to taxpayers in an efficient manner again there will be strong pushback on transportation improvements.

Fred
Fred
8 months ago
Reply to  Randi J

Sorry, Randi, but I don’t buy your argument. Yes, the city is run terribly in most respects, but residents still support the (few) well-run parts.

Your posts always seem to highlight homelessness and trash, which are certainly problems, but they don’t preempt everything.

Marcus Green
Marcus Green
8 months ago
Reply to  Fred

Fred, it seems the point made was much more than complaining about trash and homelessness. It’s about what is not working for Portland and why average citizens feel thier voices are not being heard. It was that many residents are tiring of the ideologically driven efforts (social justice, racial justice, care of vulnerable residents taking precedence over providing basic essential city services (911, fire, police, parks, permitting, trash remvoal, transportation maintenance and improvement, etc). Not that efforts improving racial and social justic are not important but that one can’t do them without ALSO providing the basic and required essential services that need to be provided by one’s city and county. It’s about lack of faith in our local government with its high taxes and anemic services for taxpayers. Unitl ths changes, the downward trend of livability in Portland will contine.

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  Marcus Green

I don’t think social and racial justice is effecting essential services in Portland; that’s quite a stretch, and I find essential services in Portland working pretty well. The mundane day-to-day operation of the city goes on despite the sometimes sensational headlines.

Dusty Reske
Dusty Reske
8 months ago
Reply to  Arturo P

Nah, I’m an eastside dude.

What do essential services have to do with the homicide rate? Or social and racial justice? Blaming murders on people who want justice doesn’t make much sense to me; how are you connecting these dots? The police come after there is a crime and have limited utility to stop murders, speeding cars, people shooting up in the alley, whatever.

Anyway, homicides have been up nationally; justice movements and ineptitude at Portland city hall simply don’t explain the uptick in U.S. violence.

John V
John V
8 months ago
Reply to  Randi J

I call BS on that (in the nicest way possible). In any change there are going to be people who didn’t want the change. This is just those people somehow convincing PBOT to go back on a well thought out solution to a problem. Same with the Broadway debacle and yes the medians on Division. It was a perfectly fine solution, not perfect, but an improvement. And now we have the people who opposed the idea, and didn’t get their way, continuing to whine and complain, and our spineless or corrupt (take your pick) council listening to them as if history doesn’t exist.

Arturo P
Arturo P
8 months ago
Reply to  John V

I think more would come out in support of PBOT’s “well thought out solution” if people had faith that our local government was well functioning. Right now many of us don’t feel it or see it. There is so much dysfunction and virtue signaling from the COP that every action is now suspect. It’s gonna talk a lot of effort to convince most residents that we are once again “the city that works”.

John L
John L
8 months ago

Requiring drivers to make a 25 block detour is pretty significant. PBOT could instead add a paved bike lane (bi-directional or N/B) alongside the road. Unlike most traffic dilemmas, there is room to give everyone what they want.

We’re talking a simple 6’ asphalt path, not a “roadway” engineered for motor vehicle use, so if PBOT says it will cost $5 million, call that out as nonsense.

idlebytes
idlebytes
8 months ago
Reply to  John L

Requiring a handful of drivers to occasionally make a 5 minute detour. FTFY. Not everyone lives right on the north side of 72nd. I’m betting quite a few of them turn left or right those people are not going 25 blocks. Which again google says takes 5 minutes. Also it’s not like the people who do live right on the other side of the golf course always come home from the south side of the golf course. How often do they drive down Tillamook to get to 72nd? How hard would it be to go north sooner and drive down Sacramento?

Finally anytime cyclists ask for a bike lane on a main street like Hawthorne that actually has places to go on it drivers always chime in to say it’s not that hard to go 5 minutes out of our way and take a greenway like Lincoln. Here we have a street with no destinations on it that’s basically a cut-through for people wanting to save a few minutes but heavens forbid we don’t allow them access to this one road in one direction.

John V
John V
8 months ago
Reply to  idlebytes

This 100%. On a grid (or mostly grid) street system, it doesn’t matter what route you take (depending on speed limits or whatever), the time to get from A to B is the same so long as you’re always going closer. People can simply take a different path to get through unless they happen to be starting immediately on one side of the golf course and ending immediately on the other. It’s a vanishingly small subset of people, and the only ones who use that route only do it out of habit.

Fred
Fred
8 months ago
Reply to  John L

Are you okay with bike riders needing to make a 25-block detour?

(We do it all the time, just to find a non-sketchy street to ride on.)

Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  John L

You clearly haven’t been on this street, because there is most definitely not enough room on the north end for any kind of widening, without spending millions on a massive retaining wall of some kind. The most dangerous section of this roadway is also the section that can’t really be widened to provide a MUP.

Watts
Watts
8 months ago
Reply to  Chris I

I’ve never ridden this, but just toured it via street view. There is a goat trail along the road’s entire length, except at the northern end where, as you say, things get constricted. However, there is a formal or informal cutoff just before that constriction that could be used to avoid that area.

I’m not advocating for any particular solution (it doesn’t look super dangerous, but I’m not fully aware of the reasons PBOT wants to close the street to cars, and I never use the facility so it’s not really my place), just noting that an adjacent path could be built without spending millions on a retaining wall.

idlebytes
idlebytes
8 months ago
Reply to  Watts

just noting that an adjacent path could be built without spending millions on a retaining wall.

You say that like the adjacent path wouldn’t cost millions either. Also can you imagine the pushback PBOT would get when their plan inevitably required some trees to be cut down and other vegetation removed? All to not inconvenience a handful of homeowners when they occasionally want to drive north to their home without having to go west first.

Watts
Watts
8 months ago
Reply to  idlebytes

The comment I was responding to was that a path would require a multi-million dollar retaining wall. I don’t think it does. That’s all I was saying.

I have no idea what a path would cost in dollars or trees, whether it would solve the problem, or even if there is a problem that needs to be solved. But I do think a retaining wall could be avoided if a path were built.

Ben Joy
Ben Joy
8 months ago
Reply to  Watts

Year old image when this topic was first discussed at a neighborhood meeting. A switchback would bring riders closer to the connecting street. This is the shortest height section of the bluff.

IMG_1950.jpg
Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  Ben Joy

Millions of dollars to construct something like that. This solution is out of scope.

Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  Watts

That “connecting path” is a 45 degree slope. Adding a MUP up here would look something like the switch-backs leading to the Hollywood MAX station on the north end. Millions.

Ben Joy
Ben Joy
8 months ago
Reply to  Chris I

Why couldn’t they build similar to Springwater at Hogan Road?

lvc
lvc
8 months ago
Reply to  John L

I’m looking at google maps trying to get an idea of how many people would actually be subjected to this “25 block” detour. Parents driving their kids to Roseway Heights Middle School that live south of the gold course near 72nd are probably getting close to this length of detour, and I can understand about not being thrilled about it. It looks like Roseway Heights’ school bus makes a big counterclockwise loop around the gold course and approaches the school via 82nd.

Otherwise, it looks like it’s almost a mile through the gold course and purely residential streets to get from Tillamook to Sandy. Of course, most destinations on Sandy aren’t going to be right at the greenway. I don’t have a lot of sympathy for people losing the ability to cut through neighborhood streets that far to save a couple of minutes.

lvc
lvc
8 months ago
Reply to  lvc

“gold course” That’s embarrassing.

John L
John L
8 months ago
Reply to  John L

I’ve ridden this quite a bit. Agree, something else would be needed for the final bit on the north end. e.g. a section of barrier protected bike path in the roadway, or send the path up to Sacramento before the sharp curve. Seems doable, assuming PBOT remembers how to do more than paint lines on existing roadway and glue down plastic wands. No tree cutting required, as there is a dirt shoulder the whole length oof the road except in that last northern bit. Anyway, when did PBOT start caring about trees?

Matt
Matt
8 months ago

I think this issue highlights the dire predicament auto users in Portland face because of the scourge of impenetrable golf courses and public parks and spaces.

For example, there’s no road dissecting Glendoveer Course between 131st Place and 148th Avenue. And, don’t get folks on NextDoor started on the headache of trying to get around the circumference of Powell Butte.

We know that non-emergency personnel drivers shouldn’t be inconvenienced when it comes to traveling in a shared, urban setting — I’m looking at you Rose City Cemetery between 47th and 57th –. so, please, city commissioners, heed this clarion call from the ardent and give auto users their sacred cut throughs.

I believe the campaign is called “Carve for Cars.”

JBull
JBull
8 months ago

I live right next to the golf course and was surprised that there was no engagement on this change. I fully support it, but knew right away that there would be community pushback. They should have done some outreach. There was a great community event in the golf course in August- PBOT should have tabled with project materials.This is why engagement matters!

Francisco
Francisco
8 months ago

Sounds similar to the pause on San Rafael between NE 122nd and 148th. It’s lasted 12+ months, and still no engagement or work to complete the project in any meaningful way. The lack of clarity on traffic pattern on this stretch is going to get someone really hurt. I know I’ve had close calls both on bike and in a car.

Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  Francisco

Seriously, what the hell is going on with this street? They erased the bike lane just east of 122nd, right in the most dangerous section. This two-block stretch is a GD nightmare every time I ride through.

Ben Joy
Ben Joy
8 months ago

There absolutely needs to be a safe route for pedestrians and cyclists on 72nd. The solution from PBOT was horrible. PBOTs data provided to the neighbors was 1231 north bound cars daily. This would shift cars to either 82nd and past McDaniels and Roseway or west on Tillamook to 60/61st (Snake Hill) near Rose City Park school. Both routes have unfinished streets and would certainly gridlock neighborhoods at rush hour. Likely means removing parking for neighbors as well. There is plenty of space to build a path to the east of 72nd with an ADA compliant switch back to Sacramento. Metro has set $2M aside for a path around the golf course. I would hope Metro and PBOT would design together on this project.

Chris I
Chris I
8 months ago
Reply to  Ben Joy

1200 cars a day is absolutely not going to gridlock the neighborhood. And your statements are carefully crafted to imply that this tiny increase in traffic is going to somehow endanger children. The reality is that 82nd is already a car sewer, and the additional traffic won’t even be a blip. Most of the traffic on the west end will be split between 61st and 57th/Sandy. Minimal impacts to Rose City, because 57th is already very busy.

Ben Joy
Ben Joy
8 months ago
Reply to  Chris I

61st is the short winding hill that is connected by a residential street with cars parked on both sides. PBOT wanted this steep hill to the bike route. 60th is more open, but also has cars parked on both sides. Many times each day this is a stop on go as it allows one vehicle at a time. Add more cars and its worse. Many of the feeder streets to 57th have no sidewalks nor are they paved side to side. Not ideal. 82nd is fine, but traffic will cut west just north of McDaniels and the park. That feeds directly to Roseway Middle school and again not a finished street. Not ideal. Shutting the street down benefits all the homeowners to the north, but the impact to the south will be less than ideal. I’d prefer a real solution that adds a new path. But it’s done. Just because many disagree with this solution PBOT tosses out to the problem does not mean we don’t want to solve the problem. PBOT backs into solutions by looking at their budget. I’d prefer they came up with a few solutions and then public debate of the pro/cons of each solution.

Steven Williams
Steven Williams
8 months ago

How nice. Maybe PBOT should have listened more to the businesses on Foster before creating the traffic disaster they have made of that street.

Damien
Damien
8 months ago

Foster is monumentally improved over the previous iteration.

Steven
Steven
2 months ago

Gotta love the idea that the worst thing that can happen is someone having to drive on a street that is “somewhat congested”, rather than, you know, hitting a pedestrian or cyclist.