TriMet opens new bus stations on SE Division with shared bike lane design

Posted by on March 25th, 2021 at 12:33 pm

Still from TriMet video of new bus station design (with unfortunately inaccurate bicycle characters who look like they’re competing in the Tour de France).

The result of three and-a-half years of design, planning, and hand-wringing at TriMet is finally on the ground and ready for use. The agency announced today that they’ve opened a new type of bus station as part of their Division Transit Project.

The $175 million project — which aims to bring faster, more reliable bus service between downtown Portland and Gresham — won’t fully open until fall of 2022. But two of TriMet’s “shared bicycle and pedestrian” station types have been opened early.

We’ve covered TriMet’s design process for years as they looked for the best solution to manage the demands of bus operators, bus passengers, bicycle riders — and most importantly, the project’s budget.

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Aerial view.

(The new station at SE Division and 130th. Photos by TriMet)

This design is one of four that will be used across the project’s 80+ station locations. It’s also the most common with 19 stations getting this treatment. The other station type that incorporates a bike lane (known as the “Island” design) is more expensive and puts the bicycle lane behind the station. It will be used at only three locations (east and westbound 82nd, and 122nd eastbound).

You can try the new station design starting Sunday April 4th at SE Division and 130th (eastbound) and 135th (westbound).

TriMet’s chief concern with the design has been how to mitigate the potential for collisions between bicycle and bus users. They’ve put out an educational video (above) and expect lots of signs and messages as these roll out. Really there’s nothing special about them. Just don’t be a jerk. If a bus is at the station, slow way down and wait for people to get on and off. You know, like normal compassionate human beings do in similar situations every day.

If you’re a fan of Copenhagen, you’ll appreciate that this type of bus station is used frequently there. I observed several of them during a trip there in 2013 and they worked well.

Similar design used in Copenhagen.

Learn more at TriMet.org

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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LucarioCaptainKarmaeawristeBicycling AlJason McHuff Recent comment authors
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James S
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James S

For a second I read this as the single bus stop costing $175 million. Lol!

rick
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rick

Some people fought hard to preserve “free” car parking. Maybe it added to the cost or the speed of the bus?

James S
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James S

Just noticed they didnt take the time to raise the curb another 4 inches for level boarding. Really?

J_Wink
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J_Wink

My assumption is that they have to keep them at sidewalk height, otherwise you would have to step up onto the platform, which creates a trip hazard/ADA issue.

Cooper
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A new fleet of buses coming next year will fix this. https://trimet.org/division/#newbuses

David Hampsten
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ChadwickF
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ChadwickF

So, if I’m reading this right, only 4 of these facilities will be in use at stations, and the other “stations” referenced to are not getting any enhancements and they will just be stops?
I couldn’t tell from the project website.
Sorry if I’m coming off a little dim, I couldn’t tell.
Thanks.

Jason McHuff
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No, there’s four types of designs, with 19 of this type.

Bicycling Al
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Bicycling Al

On the one hand, you got a straight through bike path rather than one that goes around the bus shelter. On the other hand, you got a bike path going straight through people embarking and disembarking the bus.

Technically, since you’ll ride through this without the bus there most of the time, then this design should be superior to one which goes around the backside of the bus shelter IF waiting passengers don’t stand around in the bike lane.

CaptainKarma
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CaptainKarma

Bus riders are usually craning their necks out while standing exactly there, to see if the bus is coming. Not that it is coming any quicker by looking every 30 seconds….

Lucario
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Lucario

That bike lane in Copenhagen is completely different, for one its much wider and two, it’s on a far narrower street. Division is five car lanes wide and they still put in a 4-foot bike lane and no dedicated bus lane LOL