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The Monday Roundup: Pinarello propaganda, the reciprocity myth, Vancouver’s success, and more

Posted by on November 27th, 2017 at 9:57 am

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Welcome back! Hope your long holiday weekend was everything you hoped for. Here are the best stories we came across last week…

This week in car culture: Fox News show host Jeanine Pirro was cited for driving 119 mph in a 65 mph zone and said she “didn’t realize how fast she was driving.”

Housing for people or for cars?: Portland’s very own Michael Andersen and Tony Jordan report for Mobility Lab that California is set to sample some of our parking policy successes.

Pinarello’s busy week: The legendary Italian bike maker launched a new road model with an electric motor, then they pulled the ad campaign after people felt it was sexist.

Amanda Batty isn’t having it: This pro mountain-biker eviscerated Pinarello’s campaign by calling it the “pinnacle” of bro culture and what she thinks was intentional propaganda.

Edmonton knows: A place with much more snow and cold than Portland gets has found that all it takes to keep people riding through winter is a protected and connected downtown bikeway grid.

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Curb lanes are so hot right now: Streetsblog breaks down why more cities are — very smartly — using curb lanes for more than just free parking for private automobiles.

Buses on the mountain: Oregon Business has a great piece on how a combination of new services has vastly improved bus service to Mt. Hood.

Don’t double-down, tear it down: That’s what some smart people are starting to talk about in Seattle. It’s been talked about in Portland too; but usually only as a “crazy idea” while our DOTs and our Mayor want to double-down and make it even wider.

Bike thieves suck: Portlander Patrick Weaver got a new bike on Saturday, only to have it stolen from inside his car a few hours later.

The Copenhagen of North America: We’ve recently shared Seattle’s transit success, now let’s go a bit further north and see how Vancouver has reduced drive-alone trips by improving transit service and building protected bikeways.

The myth of reciprocity: When it comes to people using roads with vastly different vehicles that’s based on a “system of automobility” it’s absurd to approach policy discussions as if all things are equal.

Video of the Week: As Portland works to take bigger steps to achieve our transportation goals, consider this video about L.A.’s road diet wars a cautionary tale:

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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Jason Skelton
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Jason Skelton

Watched the Reason video. You probably know but Reason is a libertarian ***deleted by moderator*** organization. What’s more, this video’s particular assumption is that driving by car is the default and least-cost way for people to travel. Any deviation from that should be measured by how it affects those preferring to drive.

Charles Ross
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Charles Ross

I would have greatly enjoyed seeing pirro in handcuffs. She is just about the biggest phony out there and considering whom she supports and hangs out with that’s a considerable dis

Erleichda
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Erleichda

It’s official. We can stop having debates and planning and inaction. Vancouver did it. Just copy their efforts. It won’t be perfect, we may have different challenges. But perfect is the enemy of good. Good grief. Portland suffers from too many opinions, too little action.

bikeninja
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bikeninja

When I was in kid back in the 70’s we always took the bus to the mountain. There were buses that left from a dozen places around the metro area that went to Timberline, Ski Bowel, Government Camp and Meadows. Left at various times also. Interesting that in the intervening years ( till now I hope) they mostly faded away leaving just the private motor car, no wonder we have so much congestion.

wsbob
Guest

Mentioned in last weeks roundup, the NYtmes story on why the city is having problems keeping its subway system trains able to stay on schedule, is I think, very worthwhile reading. Basically…over years, decades, city and state gradually cut back the budget for regular scheduled maintenance to the point where the trains are breaking down with increasing frequency.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/18/nyregion/new-york-subway-system-failure-delays.html

A public transit system on the scale of New York City’s, is the dream of many people that ardently believe in the superior practicality of such systems over relying to far greater level on personal motor vehicles to meet population travel needs. New York’s subway system was heralded in the 70’s, after a lot of needed repairs and upgrades. But, obviously, the budget for such systems is gargantuan, and extraordinarily tempting as a target for budget cutbacks by government officials seeking to please their constituency by reducing taxes by some means. Even if inevitable negative consequences aren’t readily apparent to everyone that needs to know about them, at the time the tax reductions are introduced.

Portland’s mass transit system continues to grow and grow larger. As does its maintenance requirements. If that system can continue to be a viable form of mass transit, hopefully for a greater number of the people that are using personal motor vehicles for travel on streets and highways, maintenance of the system has to be top notch.

vs
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vs

To echo wsbob, DC is seeing significant challenges on the metro system, also as a result in deferred maintenance.

Jason Skelton
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Jason Skelton

I should clarify that libertarian people may be nice and productive, but libertarian policy ideas are delusional and nutty. Their policy positions tend to assume away transaction costs and externalities, or the ideas are just niave and unworkable.

Toadslick
Subscriber

Step one: Start decades ago.

The subtitle for that Vox article is unnecessarily defeatist. I don’t believe it has to take decades. All we need is paint, jersey barriers (or cheap planters), and political bravery to have bus lanes and connected, protected, direct bike routes across all of Portland.

I know more people that want to bike commute, but are afraid to, than people that actually bike commute. I’m convinced that this city could see a huge shift in mode share, if only we had the infrastructure so that people felt safe.

Terry D.
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Terry D.

Did anyone else notice the irony in the photos of the smog-filled skies behind and above the roads?

Jason H
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Jason H

Re: The bike theft, One thing I make sure to do if parking in a lot or garage with a bike inside other that lock car and set the alarm is back in to a spot with a wall behind and get very close so that the hatch on my vehicle doesn’t have clearance to open more than an inch or two. It would be nearly impossible to remove the bike through the hatch or any door and be VERY time-consuming and obvious to even try. Hopefully a factor that adds up to “move-on” to any would be thief.

B. Carfree
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B. Carfree

The Pinarello e-bike ad controversy was interesting to my wife and me. She has never been as strong a rider as me, but when we lived in the Central Valley she could just draft, even when we were riding 25-30 mph for hours at at time (being young was really fun). On our regular weekenders to the coast, I’d carry all the gear and just rest on the climbs. Eventually, we got a tandem for our longer rides and tours. (She rides captain so both of us can see the sights.) Problem solved.

When we came to Oregon and found the motorists to be less accommodating towards people on bikes, we decided to not ride the tandem for a number of years. We simply did not wish to leave our child with zero parents if some clueless car addict took us out. We looked into e-bikes, but they weren’t ready for prime time. (She’s again considering one now that they appear to be fully functional.) Our child is now grown and so we are back on the tandem routinely.

We’re practically the embodiment of the Pinarello ad: a couple who wants to ride together but one is much stronger than the other. Is it sexist to portray a female as the weaker rider when that’s the case in well over 90% of the couples who ride that I know? I guess it is, since sexism is an eye of the victim thing, but it’s not something that really jumped out for either of us. Like I said, we both find the controversy interesting. I guess we both have things to learn in this arena.

Spiffy
Subscriber

Pinarello pointed out the obvious and now people are mad at them? look at the cycling records and you’ll see all the women’s records are lower than the men’s…

do all women need this? no? but it’s a real market and those consumers should be targeted… word it nicer to not hurt feelings next time? not needed… would it have been better if the gender roles were reversed? are we no longer allowed to point out the differences between types of people?

also, my better half got an electric bike specifically because she couldn’t keep up with me…

Al
Guest
Al

Regarding bike theft and parking garages…. I feel like garages are the problem here.

They want to have have their cake and eat it too. When I pay for street parking, at least I’m getting the value of having the spot under police surveillance in a way that any public spot in the city is. When I park in a garage, it’s a Walking Dead zone. Parking garages consider the limit of their responsibility for their business to be taking my money. After that, all bets are off as they matter of factly state on their “Secure Valuables” signage. These might as well read “Secure Valuables. Sucker!”

Let’s not get into a litany of what I have witnessed taking place in parking garages. The fact is that these businesses have the capacity to cheaply secure their property AND yours but simply shrug off even this modicum of responsibility.

When they continue to ignore a problem that is so obvious and most importantly easy to address, they start being culpable for it.

GlowBoy
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GlowBoy

As I pointed out above, there is a very big difference between civil libertarians (many of whom, myself included, support what’s often known as “big government”) and across-the-board Libertarians. The former want to limit government restriction of individual civil liberties; the latter also want to do that but further limit government, period.

Pot legalization, abortion rights and abolition of the death penalty are common to both, and as such aren’t good examples of what distinguishes Libertarians (those without the word “civil” in front of the L-word) from everyone else.