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Industry Ticker: New ‘Atlas’ jacket from Showers Pass; Islabikes launches ‘cross tires for adults

Posted by on February 22nd, 2017 at 12:07 pm

New offerings from Portland-based Islabikes and Showerspass.

We love seeing local bike companies expand their product lines. It demonstrates that our bike economy is strong and that the spirit of innovation from our local bikey brain trust is alive and well.

Today we’ve got words and pictures of two new products now available from two Portland companies: Showers Pass and Islabikes USA.

The Atlas Jacket from Showers Pass

Showers Pass introduces a new addition to their line of technical waterproof breathable outerwear called the Atlas Jacket. The Atlas stands up to the elements with 3-layer waterproof breathable fabric, a PFC-free durable water repellent treatment and fully sealed seams for all weather protection. The unique MapReflect fabric design consists of 11 international cities known for cycling (Portland, New York, Washington DC, Paris, Barcelona, Amsterdam, London, Newcastle, Berlin, Sydney and Taipei). “The Atlas Jacket is equally at home on a bike commute or a world tour,” says Kyle Ranson, Showers Pass president. “We wanted a jacket that supports an active outdoor lifestyle, stands up to bad weather, and offers a stylish way to stay visible to traffic at night.”

For the world traveler, year-round commuter, and outdoor enthusiast; the Atlas Jacket is optimized for those who demand visibility without compromising comfort or style. The screen printed reflective map pattern is visible from 200 meters with car headlights. Fully waterproof and breathable, the technical fabric provides stretch to move comfortably with a body in motion.

The jacket also features a soft, brushed lining and front hand warmer pockets to lock in extra warmth when needed. Meanwhile, adjustable airflow cuffs as well as large core vents prevent overheating during high energy activities. Because of the unique map design and the way the patterns are cut during production, no two jackets are exactly alike. Look around the world and try to find a feature loaded shell that stands out from the crowd like this.

Features:

– Extra-long core vents prevent overheating
– Exclusive airflow–regulating cuffs
– Ergonomic easy-grip zipper pulls
– Removable hood fits over a helmet and stows in inside pocket
– Drawcord at hood and double toggle cinch at hem
– Soft, moisture wicking lining at collar
– Front hand warmer pockets and chest pocket with audio ports
– Light loops on back
– Regular fit
– Men’s Sizes SM-XXL
– Women’s Sizes SM-XXL
– Color: available in black

MSRP: $275

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Gréim Cyclocross Tires from Islabikes

Islabikes, known as a children’s bike specialist, now offers two models of cyclocross tires for adults. Their Gréim model is available in a standard ($29.99) and “Pro” ($54.99) version.

Gréim Pro

The tread pattern includes a closely-spaced center line section to reduce rolling resistance on hard pack, with scaled and spaced aggressive side knobs for effective mud shedding and excellent grip in corners. The 185 TPI casing on a folding Kevlar bead incorporates skin will technology giving a smooth and supple ride at lower pressures. The Gréim Pro tires will retail at $54.99 per tire and are available in three sizes:
24 x 1.18 (30-507) – 260g
26 x 1.22 (31-559) – 300g
700 x 32c (32-622) – 340g

Gréim

The same tread pattern as the Gréim Pro can be found on the Gréim. Retailing at $29.99 per tire,
these feature a lower thread count at 72 TPI, a wire bead and a Kevlar belt for added puncture
protection and will also be available in:
24 x 1.18 (30-507) – 360g
26 x 1.22 (31-559) – 390g
700 x 32c (32-622) – 440g
We’ve got a pair of the Gréim Pro tires and will be giving them a go on local dirt roads and trails. Stay tuned here and on social media to learn our impressions. If you want more local industry news, check out our Industry Ticker column and our Business story archives.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are productive, considerate, and welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

22 Comments
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    In Trump We Trust February 22, 2017 at 12:18 pm

    Jacket looks like city camo. Are they wanting cyclists to be invisible to drivers?

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      Todd Boulanger February 22, 2017 at 12:45 pm

      See the image of the retro-reflectivity when a lamp is shown on it.

      [Though with all the distracted drivers out there…not sure how much reactive orange/ yellow hi-viz can counter it anyway…]

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        Spiffy February 22, 2017 at 1:24 pm

        looks like dirty windshield glare…

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          In Trump We Trust February 22, 2017 at 1:31 pm

          🙂

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      John Lascurettes February 22, 2017 at 12:47 pm

      All the streets in the map are retroreflective. That thing will light up like a Christmas tree from headlights in the dark.

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        Spiffy February 22, 2017 at 1:26 pm

        being lit up like a christmas tree (literally) has not stopped drivers from running into me or violating my right-of-way…

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        In Trump We Trust February 22, 2017 at 1:30 pm

        It may be OK for night riding. Not so good for daylight unfortunately; which is when I do most of my biking.

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        John Lascurettes February 22, 2017 at 4:56 pm

        True that, it’s just not going to be “invisible” to drivers as the first poster stated. It’s nigh impossible to be over-visible — and yet, there will still make the claim, “I couldn’t see him” when the issue is that they were not paying attention.

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      BB February 22, 2017 at 12:55 pm

      It’s not anyone’s responsibility to help people be irresponsible drivers – Nobody is “invisible” no matter what they wear.

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        nc February 22, 2017 at 4:43 pm

        You obviously don’t drive.

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        Chris I February 23, 2017 at 7:32 am

        I drive a lot, and he is correct. I have encountered ninja cyclists and homeless people riding the wrong way at 5am. I always see them, because I am paying attention and driving safely. Are you not?

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        soren February 23, 2017 at 2:06 pm

        i’ve never been frightened by a ninja cyclist or pedestrian; however, people driving at day light speeds when it’s dark out scare me often.

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        Manville February 24, 2017 at 9:29 am

        I disagree and that is the kind of thinking that will get you killed.

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      wsbob February 22, 2017 at 7:00 pm

      “Jacket looks like city camo. Are they wanting cyclists to be invisible to drivers?” in trump, etc

      No kidding. Using a map for fabric design appearance is kind of clever, but its color and visual pattern would could have the person wearing a jacket made of it, blend in too easily with many backgrounds. During daylight hours that is. I think the retroreflective material is a great idea…at night when motor vehicle headlight illumination is reflected back off of it.

      During the day, when motor vehicle headlights tend not to be on, and when the ambient light level is relatively high, the reflective capability of the material isn’t to going to be able to do much to make the person wearing it, be more visible to people driving, than would someone else wearing any other kind of busy pattern camo jacket.

      I understand that some people greatly dislike wearing standard hi-vis colors like the green and the orange. Many don’t mind wearing those colors. Personally, I’m not keen on the green, but am more or less comfortable with shades close to standard orange or yellow, muted somewhat. I wear white too, also considered a fairly hi-vis color. Using the retro-reflective material with a generally solid pattern orange, or white..maybe a red, a silver, would appeal to me.

      The “…large core vents…” look interesting. I wonder how effective they are at venting heat from a rider’s back and neck area. I’ve never heard of core vents. Do know about underarm vents, but never have used a jacket with them. The way jackets I use tend to work, is that I size them so the collar is loose enough at the back of my neck to allow outside air to sweep down my back, pushing heated air from my back, out of the jacket through the partially open front zipper. It’s a loose fit that may people probably wouldn’t care for. Except for the cost, I might be interested in giving the jacket a try for its core vent zips.

      Too many zips isn’t a good thing, I suppose, but lengthwise on the arms has occurred to me in past.

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      Jason VH February 25, 2017 at 9:48 pm

      You get that they make a high-viz version of this right?

      Besides the fact it happens to be an amazing rain jacket that works well for stuff other than cycling, some people don’t always want to covered in neon green.

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    Mike Quigley February 22, 2017 at 12:50 pm

    Thank you for not using the word “awesome.”

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  • John Liu
    John Liu February 22, 2017 at 10:42 pm

    That is an “awesome” jacket!

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    SE February 23, 2017 at 8:36 am

    “One of my favorite clothing patterns is camouflage. Because when … Have you noticed in the television film from (fighting in) Beirut they have on camouflage suits. … They should have store fronts and car grilles on there -George Carlin.

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    Arden February 23, 2017 at 8:49 am

    This can’t be very visible in cloudy, gray daylight. While wearing neon is not a sure protection against drivers, it is better than black.

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      soren February 23, 2017 at 2:24 pm

      there is relatively little evidence one way or another, but one recent case-controlled study found that hi viz clothing and tail lights *may* increase risk of being hit at night.

      An imputed adjusted analysis revealed that red/orange/yellow front upper body clothing colour (OR 4.11; 95% CI 1.06, 15.99) and tail lights (OR 2.54; 95% CI: 1.06, 6.07) remained the only significant risk factors for MV collisions.

      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001457513005113

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  • John Liu
    John Liu February 23, 2017 at 2:27 pm

    Well, its not a high-viz jacket. There are plenty of high-viz jackets and there are plenty of people who won’t wear high-viz. This seems like the next best thing – a jacket that high-viz haters might wear, that is very reflective at night.

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    BB February 24, 2017 at 12:59 pm

    Manville
    I disagree and that is the kind of thinking that will get you killed.
    Recommended 0

    People voicing this perspective normalizes traffic violence and is part of the problem. Clothing is not part of the problem.

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