Victims will be remembered at Portland Ride of Silence on May 18th

Ride of Silence - Portland-3.jpg

Tracey Sparling was remembered
at the 2008 Ride of Silence.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

The Ride of Silence, a national day of rememberance for people killed and injured while bicycling, will be held in Portland on May 18th.

Portland has hosted one of these rides as far back as 2006 and is one of 321 cities hosting rides across 45 states. There are also rides planned in Corvallis and Medford. Portland’s ride is being organized by residents in the Arbor Lodge neighborhood who are still reeling after the crash that caused grave injuries to a local dad, Brian Duncan. Duncan was hit while trying to cross Rosa Parks Way at Delaware on March 30th.

According to local oranizer Nick Miller, the ride will meet at Arbor Lodge Park at 6:30 for a brief address where names of recent traffic victims will be read aloud.

Someone will also recite the official Ride of Silence poem which I’ve pasted below:

Read more

Portland Ride of Silence set for May 15th

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward
Ride of Silence - Portland-4.jpg

Rider at the 2008 Ride of Silence.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

The Portland edition of the Ride of Silence will take place on May 15th. The ride, which is meant to honor people who have been injured or killed while bicycling, marks its 10th anniversary this year. Portland first took part in 2006 and we’ll join hundreds of cities around the globe in a slow, silent procession through the streets.

Organizers of this year’s ride have planned an easy route and are asking everyone who shows up to wear white shirts and black or red armbands to, “add to the visual message of the silent ride.” Everyone is welcome at the event and there’s no admission fee. A few people plan to speak briefly before the ride, which starts at 6:00 pm at Chapman Square in downtown Portland. That location is just yards from SW 3rd and Madison, where Kathryn Rickson was struck and killed while bicycling on May 16, 2012.

Read more

Reader Story: What the Ride of Silence means to this mom

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

[This story was submitted by Kristi Finney, who became a traffic safety activist after her son Dustin was killed by a hit-and-run driver while bicycling in Portland last August.]

Less than a year ago I’d never heard of the Ride of Silence. I don’t remember how I found out about the website but I came across it one day and it claimed that the organization was created for this purpose:

    To HONOR those who have been injured or killed
    To RAISE AWARENESS that we are here
    To ask that we all SHARE THE ROAD

To be frank, I still wish I didn’t know what the Ride of Silence is. But now I do know, and I can’t ignore it. I can’t pretend it doesn’t exist. I can’t pretend that it’s not happening. Most of all, I can’t pretend there isn’t a reason for it… and that is what my biggest wish in all the world would be, if I could have any wish.

Read more

Portland ‘Ride of Silence’ set for May 16th

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

Portland’s edition of the global Ride of Silence is set for May 16th. The ride aims to memorialize those who have been killed while bicycling and draw attention to the importance of sharing the road. This will be Portland’s seventh consecutive Ride of Silence, with the first event being held in 2006.

Here’s more from local event organizers:

On Wednesday May 16 the Ride of Silence will begin in North America and roll across the globe. Cyclists will take to the roads in a silent procession to honor bicyclists who have been killed or injured while cycling on public roadways. Although cyclists have a legal right to share the road with motorists, the motoring public often isn’t aware of these rights, and sometimes not aware of the cyclists themselves.

The Ride Of Silence is a free ride that asks its cyclists to ride no faster than 12 mph and remain silent during the ride. In it’s tenth year, Rides of Silence have been organized in all seven continents, 26 countries and all 50 states. There are no brochures, no sponsors and no registration fees. The ride is held during National Bike Month and aims to raise the awareness of motorists, police officers, city officials and others that cyclists have a legal right to the public roadways. The ride is also a chance to show respect for those who have been killed or injured while cycling.

The Portland Ride of Silence will leave at 6pm on Wednesday May 16 from Portland Design Works (15 NE Hancock – near N Williams and NE Hancock). The route is welcoming and open to all ages, cycling experiences and skill levels and will travel slowly on N Williams, NE Going, NE 17th and Broadway. Following the ride, many will gather at Hopworks BikeBar (3947 N Williams) to celebrate life, network with each other and talk about making our roads safer for all users. Riders are asked to wear white, if possible, which will add to the visual message of the silent ride.

Facebook event listing here.

Portland Ride of Silence announced

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

Just got word about Ride of Silence from organizer Brian Echerer:

Gathering Date: Wednesday May 18th, 2011
Gathering Time: 6:00 PM – Ride announcement 6:15 – wheels rolling at 6:20
Gathering Location: Holladay Park Lloyd Center at the center of the park.
Route: 5 miles through the interior of Portland crossing the Broadway Bridge and Morrison Bridge. Link to route: http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=4317090

Post ride gathering: RonToms – 600 E Burnside

My personal note about about this ride is simple: If you haven’t been involved, get involved now before it’s someone who you know that’s been struck down. It’s a simple non-confrontational ride that makes a big statement.

With Blumenauer’s support, Ride of Silence set for May 19th

Ride of Silence - Portland-4.jpg

From the 2008 edition of the ride.
(Photo © J. Maus)

Portland’s version of the Ride of Silence is set for May 19th. Ride organizer Brian Echerer has been working with other citizen activists and partners in hopes of re-invigorating the ride after a disappointing turnout last year and he got a boost in that regard yesterday when Congressman Earl Blumenauer endorsed the event.

The Ride of Silence started in 2003 in Dallas Texas and has since spread to hundreds of cities throughout the world. It’s a somber and silent affair meant to draw attention to road safety issues and remember people who have lost their lives while biking in traffic.

Read more

Ride of Silence

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

What: Silent, slow-paced ride to honor bicyclists injured or killed on
public roads.

When: Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. The route is approximately eight miles long, and we will ride at a pace of no more than 12 mph. We expect to finish a little after 8:00 p.m.

Where: Starts outside the BikeFarm at 305 NE Wygant Street, near the intersection of NE Alberta and MLK.

More Info: The Ride will also occur in six other Oregon communities: Beaverton, Bend, Corvallis, Eugene, Pendelton, and Salem. For a complete listing of all Ride of Silence locations throughout the world, visit http://www.rideofsilence.org/.

Ride of Silence will roll through Northeast Portland

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward
Ride of Silence - Portland-7.jpg

A scene from last year’s Ride of Silence.
(Photo © J. Maus)

For the fourth year in a row, Portland will take part in the national Ride of Silence event. The local edition of this ride — which began in Texas in 2003 and has spread to hundreds of cities — will take place in Northeast Portland on May 20th.

The Ride of Silence is a silent, slow-paced ride to remember people that have been injured or killed on public roads while riding their bicycles. It will also take place in six other Oregon communities: Beaverton,
Bend, Corvallis, Eugene, Pendelton, and Salem.

Read more

Portland, Beaverton will join annual Ride of Silence

Memorial Ride for Tracey-1.jpg

(Photo © J. Maus)

Residents of Portland, Beaverton and six other Oregon cities will take to the streets on their bicycles tomorrow as part of the annual Ride of Silence.

They’ll join nearly 300 cities worldwide taking part in the event which seeks to raise awareness of bicycles on the road by remembering those who have lost their lives on two wheels.

The rides are somber, yet powerful for those who participate, and are done in a “funeral-like procession.”

Read more

Ride of Silence (Portland)

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

RIDE OF SILENCE CENTRAL PORTLAND
Internationally participated ride will be held in Portland, OR

On Wednesday, May 21, 2008, at 7pm, the Portland Ride of
Silence will start in downtown at NW Park and Everett Ave in the North Park Blocks.
The event will begin with a statement from BTA Executive Director, Scott Bricker. The
ride will commence at 7:15pm, is approximately 7miles long, and is expected to finish
between 8:15pm – 8:45pm on N Mississippi Ave between N Russell St and N Interstate
Ave. To ensure the safety of attendees the Ride of Silence in Portland will be supported
by an escort from the Portland Police Bureau’s traffic division. To view a route map visit
http://www.bikely.com/maps/bike-path/Ride-of-Silence-2008.

Ride of Silence is an internationally participated ride that was founded in 2003 in
response to the death of Larry Schwartz. Chris Phelan organized the first Ride Of Silence
in Dallas after endurance cyclists Larry Schwartz was killed by a passing bus mirror on
an empty road. In 10 days the word spread of Schwartz’s memorial ride and 1000 people
attended. Now, the Ride of Silence is held in hundreds of cities across the globe.

The Ride of Silence is a slow, silent processional to first mourn cyclists who’ve died, but
is also to raise awareness amongst police, city officials, and motorists of vulnerable road
users such as bicyclists, as a reminder to respect and share the road with all users, and to
demonstrate that bicycling is an integral part of transportation.

– MORE –
This year’s Portland Ride of Silence will pass by the memorial ghost bikes of Tracy
Sparling and Brett Jarolimek. Both cyclists were tragically killed last fall and their stories
have captured the hearts of the cycling community.

Rides will be held in 8 Oregon communities: Beaverton, Bend, Corvallis, Eugene,
Medford, Pendelton, Portland, Salem. For a complete listing of all Ride of Silence
locations please visit www.rideofsilence.org.

Join us and cyclists around the world as we remember Tracy, Brett, and others who have
died on the streets and hope that our silent statement will bring safer roads to our
community.

The Bicycle Transportation Alliance is a statewide non-profit organization that works to
open minds and roads to bicycling. We represent bicyclists and the bicycle industry with
over 5000 members in Oregon and SW Washington, and have seventeen years of
experience in bicycle engineering, planning, education and advocacy.

Ride of Silence (Beaverton)

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

The WashCo BTC is hosting the 2nd Annual “Westside Ride of Silence” on Wednesday, May 21st starting at 7pm in Beaverton. Come and join cyclists worldwide in memory of those who have been injured or killed while cycling on public roadways.

We will gather at 6:30pm a Beaverton City Library and at 7PM start the funeral-like procession of cyclists riding a 6-mile loop around the city. We will pass ghost bikes along the way, representative of those people killed on our streets and roads in Washington County. This is in conjunction with the nation wide Ride of Silence happening on the same date everywhere.

We cordially invite you to join us in this tribute to the memories of those lost and raise awareness about the relationship between bicyclists to motorists as evidenced in the “And We Bike” campaign.

Please try and make it to either the westside or downtown events. Both begin at 7pm this Wed night for 1 hr.. Come and join cyclists worldwide in memory of those who have been injured or killed while cycling on public roadways.