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Greenway upgrades will connect Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood to Springwater path

Posted by on August 25th, 2020 at 10:53 am

A new paved path is coming to this gravel section of SE 87th to open up a connection to the Springwater Corridor, currently hidden behind those bushes.
(Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

The Springwater Corridor path is vital infrastructure — especially for people who live in southeast Portland neighborhoods where there are precious few safe places to ride and most of the through streets are wide and dangerous arterials. That’s why any project that makes it easier for people to connect to the Springwater should be a high priority.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation knows this and is investing $2.1 million to make safer connections between the Springwater and the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood. I rolled out to Flavel Park yesterday to take a closer look at the Springwater Connector Neighborhood Greenway project, which just broke ground last month.

The project has two main elements: Low-stress north-south bike routes between SE Flavel St and the Springwater on SE 75th/77th and at 87th. Here’s how PBOT lays it out:

(Graphic: PBOT)

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At Flavel, PBOT plans to pave a new bike path on the eastern edge of Flavel Park that will end at SE Lambert. Construction on the path hasn’t started yet, but markings have been placed in the park where it will go (above left). From the south end of the park, PBOT plans to pave SE 75th (which is currently gravel) and add a new sidewalk for about a block or so to Crystal Springs Blvd. The route will then jog onto SE Harney and then 77th where it will connect to the Springwater via an existing paved path. The route between Flavel Park and the Springwater will have the standard greenway treatment of sharrows (to indicate a shared roadway where bicycle riders have priority), speed bumps, and bike route signs.

This section of greenway will eventually connect to the 70s Neighborhood Greenway which PBOT plans to build in 2021-2022. That route will reach all the way to the Cully Neighborhood in northeast Portland.

At 87th, PBOT has already completed a new crossing of Flavel with crosswalks, crossbikes, and a median island (above left). Currently the block south of Flavel is gravel and there’s a narrow dirt path (in above right photo) that connects to the Springwater. PBOT plans to pave a 12 to 14-foot multi-use path in this section that will come with new trees and lighting. The new path will connect directly to the Springwater.

PBOT broke ground on this project in July and expects everything to be completed by this coming January. The $2.1 million in funding is a mix of local gas tax revenue (Fixing Our Streets program), Transportation System Development Charges and Lents Town Center Urban Renewal funds.

This is just one of several new projects PBOT has been working on in east Portland lately. Stay tuned for coverage of SE 136th and the new 130s and HOP neighborhood greenways.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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Kittens
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Kittens

Sad but I just don’t care about improvements to the SC, it is trashed and dangerous. I go out of my way to avoid it. At this point, any investment in Portland MUPs seem foolish.

Suburban
Guest
Suburban

Yes, cyclists do have a right to safe travel on public roads and paths, but something I read here is that some believe they have the right to the perception of safety.That is a different thing. What you may find even more chilling is when people also openly express the belief in a right to the anticipation of the perception of safety (even for other people.)

Kittens
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Kittens

It’s no longer high-minded intellectual debate on a blog when you can’t use a mup when crackheads and unmediated schizophrenics threaten to kill you for simply passing by (this really happened). When trails are littered with human waste, trash and biohazards.

Jason Start
Guest

Sadly that is my concern over the Sullivan Gulch Trail concept plan. That MUP should absolutely be a crown jewel of cycling routes for PDX. But, at this point, I fear it’d just be a waste of money. Sad.

rick
Guest
rick

What about multi-use paths on the westside of Portland? They would allow people to avoid car pollution on Highway 30 and Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway and Highway 26 and Barbur Boulevard.

David Hampsten
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David Hampsten

The section on 87th is 8 years overdue – it’s in Lents and not Brentwood-Darlington (82nd is the dividing line between the two neighborhoods). We bugged PBOT about this when the 80s bikeway was built, but got nowhere. The 70s bikeway is also massively overdue, the Montevilla NA has been pushing it for years.

B-W’s relationship with East Portland is an odd one – it’s technically part of Southeast Uplift rather than EPCO (which Lents belongs to), but it was annexed into the city the same time as most of East Portland and has all of the same development issues, whereas Lents really has more in common with the inner Southeast neighborhoods.

SERider
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SERider

Yes, the title of this article needs to be changed. This is happening in the Lents neighborhood.

Momo
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Momo

The project clearly includes two parts, one in Brentwood Darlington and the other in Lents. The longer and more significant portion of the project is in Brentwood Darlington.

Steve Hash
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Steve Hash

I just wish I could move past the houseless problem that is plaguing the entire trail. To call it a safe route is a reach. Best of luck to the B-D and Lents neighborhoods.

D'Andre Muhammed
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D'Andre Muhammed

You’re not alone. I’d rather just ride a bike lane than go through what I went through the last time I rode the Springwater. Why even have a path like that only to let it fall into ruin? I know people have problems but damn.

matchupancakes
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matchupancakes

I’m thrilled to see this collaboration between Parks & Recreation and PBOT in filling gaps within the active transportation network.

Maria
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Maria

Normally I’d be super stoked about this, especially since it’s happening right in my neighborhood! But part of me is a bit sad because these little secret byways may now be crowded, and crowds are a bit out of vogue just now. I have witnessed many maskless men asserting their dominance in Covid-times by steamrolling other users off the bikepath. Weird, but true, and scary for those of us being cautious to protect loved ones.

Hello, Kitty
Guest
Hello, Kitty

Traveling 4 blocks south requires at least 2 blocks out-of-direction travel. Just saying!

Momo
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Momo

What’s your point? The route literally takes the shortest possible path through the neighborhood.

Chris I
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Chris I

You’re going to be really angry if you ever drive I-84 west between Troutdale and Portland and try to access something along the way.

buildwithjoe
Guest

Imagine a protect bike lane from St. Johns to Boring Oregon? Just a few broken segments remain. We are one year away from having a car free bike path from St Johns to Boring Oregon. 

Blocking this dream is  policy, and people. Money is not a block here.  

Here are the segments where there are no plans to change on car/bike conflicts! 

1) St Johns to Rosa Parks wa… Donors would step up to buy Jersey Barriers for N Willamette  ….so both directions of bikes could have the protected side of the road next to the bluff.  

2) Interstate at Moda…  I sent detailed plans to Roger Geller years ago about how to paint and reconfigure Interstate from Tillamook  The steel bridge.  Signal changes could be completed by Peter Koonce.  

3) Interstate underneath the 5/405 exchange.  This is the only place that would need to have full road construction paid for by PBOT.  It would be easy to build a protected lane on Interstate between  Hazelnut Grove and Tillamook  –  Bikes would be given a raised sidewalk path up off the road. This would protect cyclists and peds from  drivers who are always on their phones.  

I’m sending this by email to these people and you can too:
Roger and Jonathan Maus and Chloe Eudaly and Matt McNally and Carmen Rubio and Dan Ryan and Sarah Iannarone for Portland Mayor even Mingus Mapps Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) @chris.warner.773 who I just realized is married to Barbara Smith Warner pushing a 15 billion mega freeway budget in the Salem house of representatives… explains a lot..

If the people I’ve tagged do not reply, please call them and follow them on social media. No free passes inside the bike culture of Portland..

paikiala
Guest
paikiala

The pedestrian island crossing at 87th and Flavel was completed in 2012.