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“We cannot afford to go back to the way things were”: An open letter to PBOT Commissioner Chloe Eudaly

Posted by on April 16th, 2020 at 12:06 pm

“Portland’s transportation advocacy ecosystem has never been stronger. What we’re missing is leadership from city hall.”

Publisher’s note: While we’ve made a lot of noise in the past month about the need for immediate street changes to reflect new behaviors, another big part of this conversation is how best to transition our streets when quarantine is lifted. Kiel Johnson, a BikePortland contributor and owner of Go By Bike Shop & Valet under the Aerial Tram, reflects on that issue in his letter below.

Dear Commissioner Eudaly,

We cannot afford to go back to the way things were before this global pandemic. As we begin planning how our city will operate once the stay at home order is lifted, we must make big changes. We must rebuild a resilient society where social capital is available to everyone.

One of the best ways to provide universal access to social capital is in how we design our cities. People-focused designs are like an ATM where anyone can collect a social capital check. This is especially important when the real checks stop coming.

What the experts and thinkers have been telling us is that relying so much on private automobiles does not leave enough space for the creation of social capital and the byproducts of cars are killing ourselves and our planet.

Commissioner Eudaly, you are an activist and to create change PBOT needs to lean on the energy and connections that Portland activists have been building over the past decade. Catie Gould from Bike Loud PDX is one of the most articulate and passionate young transportation reformers we have seen in a long time. Jillian Detweiler has turned The Street Trust into a thoughtful and diverse organization ready to engage at the local level. BikePortland is a powerful loudspeaker that is able to inform and inspire. Pedalpalooza event organizers have brought to reality many inspirational and innovative ideas.

Portland’s transportation advocacy ecosystem has never been stronger. What we’re missing is leadership from city hall.

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“Could we roll out a temporary version of the complete 2030 Bike Plan this summer? Can we transform PBOT to do the work of Better Block on a citywide scale?”

City leaders in places like Oakland have shown how the government can work quickly. Paris’s mayor, Anne Hidalgo, has shown how to unite a city to move away from private automobiles. Car ownership in Paris has dropped in half since 2001. In Vancouver BC, city leaders have doubled bike ridership in five years to 12% of all trips.

I remember the first time we met. Myself and several other transportation advocates were sitting outside council chambers preparing to testify when you came over and told us you “were one of us” before entering the chamber. Afterwards, we were all star-struck and very encouraged by your words of solidarity.

Right now we need city leaders who can unite people around a vision of what the post-coronavirus city looks like. Listen to your most visionary planners at PBOT and ask advocates to help the city engage and build that vision. Could we roll out a temporary version of the complete 2030 Bike Plan this summer? Can we transform PBOT to do the work of Better Block on a citywide scale?

The author of this letter has started a daily “Lunch on 7th” where people are encouraged to bike on NE 7th Avenue while neighbors wave from their porches and kids look for the crazy guy in a penguin suit.

Right now we need government to work better than it ever has. We need to try big, bold, new ideas and not be afraid to adapt them as conditions change. We need to work closely with the most vulnerable people in our communities and make sure changes elevate and fulfill their needs. Most importantly, we need the government and our elected leaders to act.

This crisis has created hardship on everyone in our society, especially those who have been most exploited by our system. When we return, if we do not do things to reduce that exploitation and create a government that works better, we will have failed. We need to fill up that social capital ATM and make sure everyone has the PIN number.

If we have strong leadership and vision and work together, we can create a more sustainable movement that makes us more resilient for the next crisis. That is a legacy worth fighting for.

Sincerely,

Kiel Johnson – Bike train conductor, bike valet parker, yard sign designer, and since the pandemic, guy wearing penguin costume riding a sound system bike everyday during lunch in my neighborhood on NE 7th Avenue.

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Jim Lee
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Jim Lee

Kiel for Council!

Rain Waters
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Rain Waters

139 IQ is now apparently obsolete cuz wtf is this nonsense ?

holden
Guest
holden

i have sent multiple requests to Multnomah County Animal Services to remove the smeared goose carcass that is in Better Naito under the Morrison Bridge.

Guess what???
weeks later, that carcass is still there!!
SO GROSS, especially when it rains.

pretty sure the City depts, bureaus, etc are using this whole “shutdown” as an excuse to do NOTHING. and then more NOTHING.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

I like this letter, and agree that we need to seize this opportunity. I fear it will fall on deaf ears.

Claims of being “one of us” notwithstanding, Eudaly has never demonstrated any particular support for taming auto use in Portland, and has rejected even low-stakes opportunities such as putting out traffic cones to create temporary bike facilities on covid-emptied streets or closing greenways to non-local vehicular traffic.

I hope Eudaly surprises me, but I’d be surprised if she did.

middle of the road guy
Guest
middle of the road guy

Activism is easy – it’s not hard to appeal to the ears of like-minded individuals.
Administration is much harder – you have to meet the needs of everyone as best you can.

AMA
Guest
AMA

Activism is easy? This is news to me.

Middle of the Road Guy
Guest
Middle of the Road Guy

Try implementing policies activists are against, but still serve the greater population. It’s easy to be “for” something. It’s much tougher to put it into production.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

Posting on a message board is not activism. Activism is a LOT more work.

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

You’re confusing administration with politics.

Eudaly CAN do something right now, but fears the political backlash.

Politicians usually don’t do what’s right unless they get a lot of approval for it. If the general public that elected you wants to continue polluting and killing then you let them.

She doesn’t want to be back on her own wondering if she’ll make rent each month. Much easier to state that our ideas are unpopular and continue with the horrible situation we’re in.

Fred
Guest
Fred

Eudaly is in serious trouble, politically. She made the fatal mistake of taking on the neighborhood associations, and now she has an energized and activated network working hard to defeat her in the upcoming election. I’m guessing she is aware of the forces arrayed against her and doesn’t want to do anything to jeopardize her slim chances of re-election.

It’s possible to have your heart in the right place but be bad a politics, and Eudaly is as bad at politics as anyone I have ever seen. It’s a real shame.

kate
Guest
kate

yes yes yes!!

Zane
Guest
Zane

Love this so much.

From what I hear, many of the staff at PBOT are very enthusiastic about building protected bike lanes and car-free streets—they just need the go-ahead from leaders (who seem to still be afraid of the NIMBY vocal minority).

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

You’ll never please everyone, but I think many people oppose change because they don’t know what the consequences are, and they fear the worst. Usually the worst doesn’t materialize.

PBOT could address this on some projects (like a diverter) by installing them temporarily before the public process starts, and, after a fixed time period, removing them. Then doing their public outreach.

The trial period will give everyone a realistic view of what’s going to happen, so people aren’t operating out of fear of the unknown, and PBOT can see what’s working and what needs adjustment. It’s important that PBOT actually go through the removal stage so everyone understands it’s not an attempt to bypass public participation, and this will lessen opposition to future temporary installations.

Middle of the Road Guy
Guest
Middle of the Road Guy

All true.

I’d also add that some people oppose change because they are not getting everything they wanted.

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

Or they feel like we should be getting more than what we do with our current taxes…

Bikeninja
Guest
Bikeninja

I agree with the importance of building social capital, but an even more important reason to build alternatives to automobiles is economic. Despite most peoples best wishes ,the post Covid world will not be the same. This pandemic has happened at the very end of a 40 year debt/credit super cycle. This era of providing prosperity by substituting growing, private, corporate and public debt for stagnant wages was coming to an end and the “Rona” just brought the curtain down. When we come out of this we will have to learn to live with less and decreasing the ridiculous cost of the private automobile transportation system is one of the best ways to do that. Lets start the changes now while we still have some cash under the seat cushions.

David Hampsten
Guest

Since we are on the topic, let’s talk about revenue.

What is being proposed here by Kiel (and Jonathan in earlier posts, as well as many others, myself included) is to vastly reduce the need for cars, encourage people to walk and bike more, and to continue to work from home even after a Covid-19 vaccine is successfully administered to everyone who wants it.

PBOT, like most entities in Oregon, gets most of its revenue from sources that a dependent on people driving gasoline-powered motor vehicles as much as possible (gas tax is based on the volume consumed, not miles driven), and parking them in or near downtown (parking rates), and of course continuing to own their cars (vehicle registration fees). If we create a community where people really don’t need a car, especially to go downtown to work, then PBOT’s revenues will vastly decline (and that decline has obviously already begun.)

Also we are in a recession, possibly even a depression. Unemployment is way up, even more people cannot afford the rents they are now paying, and homelessness was very high even before this crises.

So how are we proposing to pay for these improvements? Where is the revenue coming from? And where is the future revenue coming from if we are deliberately cutting off or reducing existing revenue sources, by making driving of inefficient gas-powered vehicles more difficult and making the use of non-revenue-generating alternatives much easier and more convenient?

X
Guest
X

Demand is changing traffic patterns on the street more effectively than any number of cones and stuff. Whole families on bikes, or on foot, are now a commonplace.

Time for the city to recognize the new 85% rule. Put diverters on greenways midway between collector streets.

David Hampsten
Guest

… the 85% who obey the law and the 15% who drive like maniacs…

Chris I
Guest
Chris I

I just figured it was the fact that 85% of drivers violate they posted speed limit.

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

Those numbers are very much backwards.

todd.boulanger
Guest
todd.boulanger

Sadly it seems that the remaining cars on many of our roads are operated by those “15% who drive like maniacs”…

Roberta Robles
Guest
Roberta Robles

is the penguin suit in memory of Penguin Park on Rosa Parks? A tribute to that one time the zoo stored their penguins at Peninsula Park♥️

Roberta Robles
Guest
Roberta Robles

FWIW I think Katie Gould should get an Alice award for showing up for the hard work of organizing, data mining and social media shero!

Asher Atkinson
Guest
Asher Atkinson

Sorry to be a stickler for detail, but what is the specific ask of the city in this open letter? If it’s temporarily rolling out the complete 2030 bike plan over the next few months, how exactly would that work? I’m often frustrated at the city’s pace when it comes to rolling out improvements, but a 10 year plan isn’t going to happen with the snap of a finger for both practical and political reasons, even with a lot of improvisation. The city and state are quickly going bankrupt and have a lot of competing priorities now and in the foreseeable future.

Clearly many, particularly those in truly crowded and polluted cities, have had a glimpse of a more idyllic urban landscape, and I’m hopeful it will leave a lasting impression and over time influence the small choices everyone make that ultimately shape how we live. But right now the vast majority of people need the world that was just a few weeks ago restored, and want their leaders to focus solely on that.

pruss2ny
Guest
pruss2ny

100% don’t see the ask..think this is what was meant above with “activism is easy”…saying we need to” try big, bold, new ideas”…and “work closely with the most vulnerable”…awesome..i’m in…but what does it mean?

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

It means getting tens of thousands of people out of their cars and diverting millions and billions of dollars to public transportation and an urban infrastructure conducive to people walking about. Hmm….

Pruss2ny
Guest
Pruss2ny

Honestly cant tell if u are serious or sarcastic…lets assume serious:
“Diverting millions and billions” – honestly tough hill to pick to die on here…trillions are being burned here…advocating for raw new expenditures impossible unless u have the power to sneak pork into a bill disguised as essent pandemic relief

“Getting tens of thousands” out of cars…maybe advocate for tax breaks for companies to shift to 2-3 day work weeks (incenting workers to work from home 2-3days a week and/or increase flexibility in job share…this is something that coupd fly in this environment as every workforce is being forced to figure out how to make these arrangements work. 2-3 day work weeks down from 5 wud certainly impact #of cars on road

X
Guest
X

Here’s a specific ask: turn existing greenways into effective people places by doubling the number of diverters. Use temporary markers that are available, perhaps empowering volunteers to fill in a spraypainted outline. Follow that up with permanent installations using curbs or planters.

X
Guest
X

Neighbors on NE 7th Avenue have shown the way by having a regular schedule of street parties. No doubt that program is in abeyance now, sigh, but the city has made it pretty easy to do in a normal time.

Paulina bartnik
Guest
Paulina bartnik

You know, I don’t ride a bike I haven’t in a while, I have a dog and I regularly walk her. One thing I am considering … How it would be if I was to give up my car. I would like to know from people who have done that how they have weathered the experience. I would like to know what they’ve gained and what was difficult.

Rain Waters
Guest
Rain Waters

A bicycle frees one from dependency on externalized infrastructure to whatever degree the persons evolutionary state allows. The work of Illich. As to bicycle free “anti car” living. . .
Train your body to walk a solid 6 in under two hours or youre wiser to learn to maintain a cheap beater car where it rains. Riding busses and public trains for decades is a devolutionary mistake to a realized human being. A glaring example of unconsciously replicated biomass squeezed into breeding coops illustrated this well, then it appears this civilization,

Amused itself to death

Alan 1.0
Subscriber

If you haven’t already, check out Becky Jo’s columns on this blog. She and her family made an abrupt change to being car free, and it sounds like she’s managing the change very well.

https://bikeportland.org/author/beckyjo

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

The kicker, she had to because of financial reasons. When you have to, you have to manage well, or every day is a challenge. I was car free for six years because of financial reasons. I loved that time of my life, granted I was in my mid twenties, worked at a bike factory, lived with roommates that loved bikes, had no dependents and dated women that also enjoyed my lifestyle. So, if you have a “cultural support network” that promotes bike free life, then it can be amazing!

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

Excuse me, car free life. These days I feel like I’m bike free, but I want to get back.