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PBOT officially opens the nine-mile, $4.5 million, 20s Bikeway

Posted by on August 24th, 2017 at 11:07 am

28th-Powell bike signal.jpg

One of the centerpieces of the new 20s Bikeway is this updated crossing of SE Powell Blvd at 28th that includes median islands and a bike-only traffic signal.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Four years after planning work got underway and seven years after it was funded, the City of Portland will officially open the 20s Bikeway today.

“The 20s Bikeway provides a seamless, low-stress cycling path… that serves a broad range of cyclists.”
— PBOT

At an event slated for 11:00 am, City Commissioner Dan Saltzman and Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat will join neighborhood advocates to mark the (near) completion of the project, which they refer to as a, “world class route for biking and walking.”

The 20s Bikeway is a new connection in our network that spans over nine miles north-to-south between the Springwater Corridor at its southern end and NE Lombard in the north (view map PDF here). With a budget of around $4.5 million (funded by a Metro/ODOT grant and transportation system development charges), the bikeway is a mix of striped bike lanes (some protected, some not), neighborhood greenway treatments, and updated crossings of major streets.

Here’s more about the new route from PBOT:

The importance of this route starts with its north-south orientation. Most of the bicycle network is currently oriented in an east-west direction, where it can use a dense and continuous network of local streets. Portland’s north-south street network is more difficult to traverse on bike: the streets are often interrupted by dead ends and dogleg routes, there are major barriers with few places to cross, such Interstate 84, and because there are more busy arterial streets to cross. The 20s Bikeway provides a seamless, low-stress cycling path through these obstacles that serves a broad range of cyclists.

The new route connects to a large number of neighborhoods and destinations. More than 35,000 residents, including 5,500 school-aged children, live within a quarter mile of the route. It travels through 13 neighborhoods and six commercial districts, and provides access to 14 parks and 12 schools. Along the way, it intersects with 14 existing east-west bikeways and six more that are planned.

To make the route an enjoyable bicycling experience for people of all ages and abilities, the project used a broad range of roadway improvements to ensure safety and convenience for the public. It improved 17 crossings of busy arterial streets, with benefits for people walking and biking. More than two-thirds of the route uses low-traffic volume and low-traffic speed residential streets that have been calmed to the latest Portland standards for neighborhood greenways. The other third of the route uses neighborhood collector streets that have been upgraded with bike lanes, most with buffered bike lanes and several segments with protected bike lanes.

The City has also released these before-and-after images of key crossings:

Images: PBOT

I’ve ridden the new route several times in the past month or so. Given the dearth of north-south bike connections, it’s really nice to have a route I can rely on. The presence of sharrows and signage alone means I can just follow the breadcrumbs without having to think much. And the updated crossings are crucial. With a mix of bike-only signals, beg buttons, cross-bikes, median islands, and flashing beacons — the risk and stress has gone way down.

Overall, the design isn’t what I’d refer to as “world-class”. The route zig-zags far too often. This was done to get to safer/easier crossings of major streets. One consequence is that if you’re not paying attention to the signage and sharrows you’ll end up at the crossing of a busy street off the route — and without any safety improvements. The biggest annoyance is how the route avoids the 28th Avenue commercial district. As many of you recall, this was a huge debate between activists who wanted the route to be on 28th and PBOT who was unwilling to stand up to some of the business owners who value on-street auto parking more than safe access for bicycle riders.

Here’s what it looks like headed southbound just before the commercial district begins:

20s bikeway-1.jpg

Many people thought the route should never have left 28th to begin with.

20s bikeway-11.jpg

Looking south on 28th where the route goes around the commercial district.

One of the bright spots is the new crossing of SE Powell at 28th. Very few people typically use 28th in this location, instead opting for the narrow — and infamously dangerous — bike lane on 26th. This new crossing was part of a grand bargain between ODOT and PBOT. As we reported, ODOT said they’d only approve PBOT’s permit for a new signalized crossing at 28th if the City promised to remove the existing bike lane on 26th. PBOT sources have told us that was a bad deal and they are reluctant to remove the bike lane on 26th. The current compromise is that PBOT will monitor traffic on both streets through the end of this year and share the findings with ODOT. “Remedies could include the removal of the bike lane on 26th,” PBOT shared with BikePortland on July 7th, “if it is determined that bike lane usage on 26th has significantly decreased.”

Here’s a video of the crossing headed southbound:

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Today’s press conference takes place at the intersection of Burnside and 30th. This is another location where PBOT has designed a new crossing to help people manage the off-set intersection. The updates consist of a bike-only signal, green cross-bike striping, and a 2-way cycletrack on the south side of Burnside. It’s a little awkward getting onto the cycletrack in the northbound direction. But once you get oriented, this is a nice improvement that provides a huge safety benefit for bicycle users.

20s bikeway-9.jpg

Northbound entry to 2-way cycletrack on south side of Burnside at 30th.

Another interesting section is the design of 30th and Stark. Headed northbound one block before Stark, riders are directed onto a 2-way protected (with green paint and plastic wands) bike lane on the west side of 30th. There’s a new bike-only signal phase at Stark that runs on a sensor. It’s unconventional to have two directions of bicycle traffic on one side of the street — so it’s a bit unsettling when people in cars turn southbound from Stark as you sit in the road waiting for the light.

See photos of this section and others below…

20s bikeway-6.jpg

Headed northbound on new 2-way bikeway on 26th just south of Stark.
20s bikeway-8.jpg

Waiting for the light at Stark (this photo is a month old and the new signal has since been activated.

bike beg button.jpg

I’m not a huge fan of beg buttons because they force you to leave the roadway and position yourself in the gutter, which isn’t the safest place to be.


20s bikeway-13.jpg

At the 28th Avenue overcrossing of I-84 PBOT encourages 20s Bikeway users to cross over to a 2-way protected bike lane on the west side of the overpass.

20s bikeway-2.jpg

The 2-way protected bikeway on 28th over I-84.

20s bikeway-14.jpg

Looking north at the 28th Avenue overpass of I-84.

20s bikeway-16.jpg

Standard neighborhood greenway treatment at NE 26th and Knott.

20s bikeway-10.jpg

Buffered bike lane on 28th approaching Sandy.

I’ll be using this new bikeway a lot. Have you ridden it yet? How does it feel to you?

You can take a closer look at all the changes and get questions answered from PBOT on their 20s Bikeway Ride on Tuesday (8/29).

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Esther
Guest
Esther

I rode the central section from Stark to Fred Meyer. Pretty good though as with most crossings on bikeways, I have problems reaching the hawk signal buttons with my cargo bike (hard to pull up next to the button without sticking out into the street), such as at Burnside. The island on Glisan is a little narrow for my cargo bike. I far would have preferred an alignment on 28th Ave through that central section. I didn’t take the two way bike line over the Banfield but was nervous that I would not have been able to turn onto Wasco on my cargo bike because of the bollards – which I hear are getting removed.

The city will be hosting a bike ride along the 20s bikeway next Tuesday at 6pm starting at Grant Park ! https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/44298#augride

julia
Guest
julia

I’m happy for all this. On a sidenote, has anyone else experienced those bike only signals making cars mad because they think you’re running the red?

Adam
Subscriber

The 20’s Bikeway is a cruel joke being played on cyclists. It takes quite possibly the hilliest route possible, it’s full of cars, lacks diversion, the half-block protected portions direct you into parked cars, drivers ignore the HAWK signals, the crossing of the highway is a dangerous, confusing mess, the route is indirect and manages to avoid basically every business district cyclists might want to visit, etc. Does anyone at PBOT actually believe that this is an improvement for cyclists?

Paul Atkinson
Guest
Paul Atkinson

This is pretty good work, on the whole, and I’ll be using parts of this route regularly.

Is this a big improvement full of welcome changes? Sure.

Is this a “world class route for biking and walking?” I mean…has the person who wrote that ever been outside Portland? Ever? Have they seen the best the world has to offer, then come back and looked at this and said “yep…same?” Because it’s not, is it?

Serpentine path designed to defer to auto traffic?
Meaningless “cross-bikes” that have no legal standing, confusing users of all modes?
Beg buttons?
Zero protection from drivers for most of the route?
Switching from right-side to left-side and back to right-side?
Percentage of protected intersections is…?

Honestly, I’m not trying to trash on the work that went into this, but keep your self-praise a little more grounded PBOT. It’s nice, and it’s better than what a lot of cities in the USA have, but if you think this is the pinnacle of safe cycling design then we need to talk.

Paul Atkinson
Guest
Paul Atkinson

Aside: I used to really enjoy going to that stretch of businesses on 28th (basically the whole stretch from Crema on the south end to Pambiche on the north).

Since they voted to tell me cyclists aren’t welcome there I have not been back. Not once. Shame, too…there are some places I liked along that stretch, but I’m not one to show up where I’m not wanted.

Craig Giffen
Guest
Craig Giffen

Oh nice, you mean they actually route you to intersections where the lights actually work? Cool.

SilkySlim
Guest
SilkySlim

Pretty psyched about the Powell crossing, especially the smooth sailing in the blocks just north of it.

David
Guest
David

I’ve been using the crossing at 30th and Burnside (southbound) about half of the time as it’s a solid way to get to Ankeny from Glisan.

As Adam alludes to the design could have been improved in a number of ways as I’ll detail:
PBOT removed a parking spot on 30th immediately North of Burnside (on the west side of the road) to provide access to the beg button on 30th and Burnside yet it’s occupied half the time making it difficult (impossible) to activate the light (I had to ask someone yesterday to press it for me).
Once the button is pressed there is no visual indicator anywhere that the light will be changing which is frustrating when you’re sitting there for over a minute.
It should not take a minute, or longer, for the light to change after being pressed, it really encourages peds/cyclists to cross Burnside without that protection.
No parking spots were removed on the North side of Burnside which makes visibility pretty poor if you’re trying to make sure there’s no oncoming traffic with or without the light.
When you get to Ankeny, no parking spots were removed making for poor visibility on a stretch where cars and bikes are routinely going fast because it’s the bottom of a hill.

Overall I can see where they are proud of the improvements and the design on this stretch really does discourage cars, however based on this stretch of road calling it “world class” is an insult to so many other cities, and frankly to other routes in this city.

Terry D-M
Guest

I guess I have been too critical of this project to be invited as I did not receive notification of this “Grand Opening”. Even though as Co-Chair of Se Uplift i am supposed to try to represent the population served by entire route south of Sullivan’s Gulch.

After the reporter called me yesterday I should have asked him when the grand opening was. I would have gone, but I guess the city does not think our coalition was important enough. It was on my list of things to do today to detirmine when this opening was so I could represent my coalition

This tells me a lot about what Pbot thinks of safety advocates. They are so afraid of criticism that even after at least a half dozen meetings I have been to with city officials about this project we were not important enough to be invited.

dwk
Guest
dwk

**Comment deleted**

Hi dwk,

If you don’t like that part of the route, why not make some suggestions on how it could be improved instead of using those mean words to describe it. Thanks.

MaxD
Guest
MaxD

This is a pretty sad excuse for a route north! All those zigs and zags and crossing the street to ride in a miserable 2-way bike lane that forces to cross back across the street a few blocks late- this introduces so much risk for people riding bikes and create so much delay! The worst apart of the 2-way cycle track is that they position bikes going the wrong way in the gutter of a 2-way street. Ugh. While looking at the map, I noticed that it may have a street mislabeled: 26th at Ankeny Burnside should, I think, be 28th.
Despite PBOT wanting people on bikes to divert to either 26 or 30th and use an provide a green light on a timer. I have ridden 28th many times, and I think the speed bumps help keep motor vehicle speeds down. However they built the speed bumps with a narrow groove that seems super dangerous. I have hit the steep side of the groove unexpectedly and it throws your balance off, and it it is narrow/deep enough that if you ride through it on a bike with a low bottom bracket, you risk a pedal strike. Any idea why they added these?

Niall M
Guest
Niall M

I like the crossing at Hawthorne & 29th, it will save some pedestrian lives. Not a fan of the 2 way bike lane at the Stark crossing, cars will ignore the ‘no right on red’ and hit some-one.
I’ll still be riding on 28th.

William Henderson
Guest
William Henderson

I’m surprised they are calling this done. South of Holgate it is still a narrow, door-zone, debris filled bike lane. My understanding is there will be buffered (but not protected) lanes at some point.

rick
Guest
rick

What is with the lack of a 20 mph school zone for the giant, nearby public high school? Jesuit has a 20 mph school zone during certain hours on school days on a 4 car lane ODOT boulevard for BH Highway.

Toadslick
Subscriber

I’m very thankful for a safer north-south route, but I also agree with many of the criticisms that Adam and Paul have shared.

Were I to drive parallel to this same route, I would not have to worry about a zig-zagging path, beg buttons, or that the route would lead me away from business districts that are my likely destination. Bicycle routes need to be made at least that simple and straightforward if bicycle mode share is to increase relative to driving.

Adam
Subscriber

The worst part of the entire route is the crossing on I-84. Why did PBOT install both a two-way protected lane as well as a conventional one-way lane on the other side? The entire thing was an awful compromise to maintain access to the Fred Meyer’s, yet PBOT could have just installed two one-way protected bike lanes on either side of the street, and avoided the terribly dangerous crossover heading northbound. Someone is going to get rear-ended on this block because if this design.

bettie
Guest
bettie

I really hate that green paint. It’s incredibly slippery in the rain. Who choses to use that? Can they do it without using slippery paint?

Justin M
Guest
Justin M

Why is it that whenever the city makes an effort to make a huge upgrade to cycling infrastructure, there are so many people who come here and shit all over it? Maybe it isn’t perfect, but it’s a great improvement. Some of those redesigned intersections are fantastic. Maybe they’ll have to make some changes in time, but every additional mile of cycling infrastructure in this city makes cycling a more attractive option, increases its visibility and viability as safe transportation.

Matt M
Guest
Matt M

When I lived on Ankeny I always used the stretch of 33rd/34th from Ankeny all the way to Gladstone. I’m not seeing what would make this new route more attractive than that. Is a painted-green bike lane statistically any safer than a quiet sharrow road like 34th?

Buzz
Guest
Buzz

I give PBOT a C- for effort and an F for execution. This thing is a circuitous POS which goes up and down some of the steepest hills in inner SE Portland over frequently horrible pavement, and includes a bunch of new and different ‘experimental’ treatments and unnecessary speed bumps on already low-traffic streets. Who do they think will actually use this route? We deserve better than this!

Kathy
Guest
Kathy

I don’t understand why ODOT is so bent on PBOT removing the bike lanes on SE 26th as a remedy “if it is determined that bike lane usage on 26th has significantly decreased.” I grew up in that neighborhood, long before a bike lane was there, and rode my bike on 26th all of the time, especially to get to Reed College or my friends’ houses in Eastmoreland or Sellwood. If I lived there today I would still use 26th, even with the improved crossing at 28th, because 28th would be out of my way. Does it cost that much for them to maintain it? Or is it a liability issue? That, if there are bike lanes, there is a presumption of safety that the City would be liable for?

jeff
Guest
jeff

ah, yes, the typical complaining in BikePortland again.
are some of you people ever happy? is the glass ever half full?

B. Carfree
Guest
B. Carfree

If a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, then this thing is a failure, just read the previous comments to see the many links that would receive grades of F. If it’s an average, then I guess it gets some sort of D. World class? I rather think not. If this is what is celebrated by PBoT, then the future is bleak indeed.

I think the problem stems from the big picture failure of PBoT. They see cycling as something that can and should be facilitated (read: made marginally safe) on only a tiny fraction of the grid and fail to see that any defect in such a sub-grid makes it fail completely. I think we should view motoring as something that has a small subset of the grid where it is viewed as dominant (like freeways) and the rest should be built to standards that allow for safe cycling throughout.

A city bike map should simply be a map of the city with a few roads and intersections marked out as uninviting.

Andrew Kreps
Guest
Andrew Kreps

That pdf map is pretty lacking and a bit unclear- any word on when the Metro bike there map will be updated? I’ll see if I can get into google and update the bike direction engine one of these days.

for reference: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/652321

CaptainKarma
Guest
CaptainKarma

The problem with a less than adequate bike thruway is that once its installed in a substandard, but close, locationn there will likely never again be an opportunity to make it right by say, putting it on 28th where it should be.

Mick O
Guest
Mick O

If only they had finished it before the Eclipse… I coulda seen it! Oh well. #soclose

Hazel
Guest
Hazel

Like all other greenway improvements, the first thing I noticed was the increase in car traffic through a lot of these streets. Already seeing a lot of cars now using 28th south of Powell.

9watts
Guest
9watts

To those complaining about the complaining –
What if we had approached this a different way?
What if PBOT invited our participation, input from people intimately familiar with the terrain, the challenges and rewards of bicycling, and we jointly cooked up a draft 20s bikeway that wasn’t (in the first iteration) weighed down with compromises. With that as the goal, we then jointly embarked on a process where we interrogated each dissenter (automobility, parking worship, Car-head, etc.) in turn, and—and this is crucial—we were armed with the 2030 Plan and a checklist against which to weigh the dissent. It is not clear to me that with a more inclusive process and some teeth to the 2030 bike master plan we couldn’t have avoided much of this heartache/missed opportunity/disappointment.

Others have no doubt thought about this in more detail, and perhaps we have some semblance of this already?

plm
Guest

Wow. Any other westside commuters who traverse the hill see these complaints and feel their eyes roll so hard they practically fall out of your head? If you tire of the tepid “inadequate”, I invite you over here for a steaming pile of “non-exsistant”.

emerson
Subscriber

My preferred route SE/NE will still be 16th to Salmon. This route seems indirect (although I do like the HAWK at 26th and Broadway when I got to Freddie’s.)

bikeninja
Guest
bikeninja

Yes, it is easy to complain about the 20’s Bikeway, and i to wish it was better and included a route down 28th, but having spent the weekend trying to find safe routes for my wife and I to ride our tandem in Beaverton ( she is a novice) the new crossings on 28th and Hoyt and 30th and Burnside are like heaven in comparison. We need to keep the pressure up on PBOT to do better, but lets celebrate what we have and double down to do better.

Jim Lee
Guest
Jim Lee

Who at PBOT is responsible for this?

Kittens
Subscriber
Kittens

This is like a museum of bad infrastructure design. Great job PBoT, mission accomplished!

joan
Subscriber

Alex Reedin
Variations on Todd Hudson’s theme – all about as good advice:
Hey sweetheart, you’d be so much more fetching if you just smiled more.
God never gives you more than you can handle.
If you compare yourself to a starving orphan in a third-world country, you’ll always be happy!
You know that you just fulfill the stereotype of the angry bicyclist/feminist/black person/lesbian right?
Recommended 3

So I’m guessing this is supposed to be ironic sexism, racism, and homophobia, but it’s really awful and not okay, because it’s sexist, racist, and homophobic.

Toadslick
Subscriber

Since i’m also guilty of piling on the negativity, I’d like to add a second comment.

The great parts about this bikeway are the safer crossing of Burnside and especially Powell. I’ve love to have regular, safer crossings of Powell all down the east side. And most of the time I feel much safer biking in Portland than I do anywhere else in the United States.

But I’ve had more than one bike-riding friend that, because they weren’t expecting a particular zigzag on a greenway, diverged from the greenway and had a terrifying interaction as a result. It’s hard to think about their experiences without getting frustrated, when our newest greenway continues the same confusing anti-patterns despite years of feedback from the people that depend on these routes.

Terry D-M
Guest

Should I dare to look into the Oregonian comments section in the morning? I have some good quotes in here. I also had a good conversation from a high ranking PBOT burocrat that went very well.

http://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2017/08/portland_declares_9-mile_45_mi.html

Christopher of Portland
Guest
Christopher of Portland

I’ve rode most of the route a few times. Plain crosswalks across busy streets with bad visibility like Belmont and Prescott aren’t enough on routes intended for the 8-80 crowd, or whoever this stuff is marketed as being for. I’ve seen a few people go through the honor system diverter on Holgate. I like some of the new crossing signals. More navigational signs are great but I got lost a couple times, near Sandy and near Concordia University. I think trees or parked box vans were blocking the signs. Better sharrows would probably help.

Ted Buehler
Guest
Ted Buehler

re: the 20s Bikeway.

It was designed 4 years ago, when PBOT’s Bike Program had very little support from the inside, and was constantly ripped on by The Oregonian and other mainstream media outlets.

It was the best design that staff could get approval for at the time.

Overlooked in a lot of the legitimate complaints is a lot of legitimate praise. PBOT took away parking in quite a few places. They tried pretty hard with the 28th Ave businesses, but had no political cover to do anything more. The route functions pretty well in a lot of places.

While I agree that some places are quite dangerous, and should be revisited (no green phase on the HAWK signals crossing Broadway, dangerous 2 way cycletrack on I-84, poor choise of routing on the “right then cross” entrance to the NB cycletrack by the Irish Pub, narrow slits in the speed humps in the 28th Ave biz district, poorly placed sharrows throughout the system) that the project itself is a general improvement. And the poor compromises are a reflection of its times.

Looking forward, we can do better. Since then, PBOT has gained a lot of its political clout back, PBOT is putting in diverters on Lincoln, they’ve put in diverters on Ankeny and Clinton, and I hope that the new Neighborhood Greenways moving forward will be safer, more direct, and be a positive reflection of the political times we are in now.

Want to see future greenways get better? Send elected officials positive support, say “please resume construction of Neighborhood Greenways — build the 2030 Bike Plan, improve existing greenways.”

If they hear from us, we’ll get more from them.

Ted Buehler

And, I certainly hope that I won’t need to eat my words if someone is badly injured on the poorly designed elements of this facility…

GlowBoy
Guest
GlowBoy

I rode the whole length of the greenway tonight, all the way from the Springwater up to Lombard. Honestly, until I got past Division it seemed great. Seemed like a good design all the way through Eastmoreland and Creston, awesome new crossing of Powell (at a potential price, I know), and the extra climbing up over Woodward on 28th wasn’t much.

But in the core section from Hawthorne to Broadway, oh what a mess. Some of the treatments were innovative, but the overall impression was of overwhelming inconsistency. There are SO MANY different treatments and types of crossings that it’s just too much. I expect this kind of variation from a city that’s new to bike-friendliness and trying out everything to see what works, not from a bike-mature city like Portland.

The absolute worst aspect, though, is most of the green zebra-striped “crossbikes.” There are a number of crossings where the bikeway has a STOP sign at a major street, and the adjacent crosswalk is zebra-striped. SOME of these crossings have green “crossbikes” next to the crosswalk, and some don’t. I have no idea why the inconsistency.

But what I do know is this: if the bikeway has a STOP sign and the major street doesn’t, bikes don’t have the right of way in these crossings. Until these “crossbikes” started popping up, the purpose of green paint or thermoplastic had always been to indicate high-conflict areas where bikes have the right of way and motorists need to yield to them.

Now they’re being installed in places where bikes don’t have the right of way, and that’s a problem for two reasons: 1) it creates confusion among motorists about what the rules are, and 2) more importantly, it creates the false impression among cyclists that they have the right of way.

Before long someone IS going to get hit in one of these crossbikes. I hope it isn’t fatal. I certainly hope that it doesn’t happen to anyone reading this, but if it does, I beg you: PLEASE make sure your lawyer adds PBOT as a defendant to your lawsuit, so they are forced to remove these dangerous green crossbikes. These are NOT an okay traffic control device, and they need to be removed.

GlowBoy
Guest
GlowBoy

My other big problem with the route is where 28th crosses Sandy and I-84. Northbound cyclists are supposed to cross bi-directional traffic on this busy street while looking 180 degrees over our shoulder? No thanks. There’s room for protected bike lanes on BOTH sides of the bridge over I-84? Why not just have northbound cyclists cross over to Clackamas (instead of Wasco), where there’s less traffic? Because six parking spots on Wasco would have to go? Is this yet another situation where this route has been compromised to save a couple of parking spaces?

GlowBoy
Guest
GlowBoy

OK, while I’m at it, one more issue: the choice of 28th through much of the “central” zone. 28th is only 25 feet wide through much of this stretch, and has parked cars on both sides for much of its length. That only leaves about 11 feet for cars and bikes to meet (or – yikes! – pass) each other. There’s not a lot of traffic on 28th, but there’s enough to make for some tense moments.

I will say I had no major issues with cars (or their drivers!) on this route, EXCEPT for the guy in a delivery truck who thought he could go straight across Stark, crossing my path, when I had the signal to go north. Fortunately he yielded to me, but it was yet another confusing moment. Only after getting across and looking back to figure out what happened did I realize he was only allowed to turn right. Maybe he didn’t realize that at the time either.

Dave Hogan
Guest
Dave Hogan

I hope when they deal with SE 28th and Steele they do something about the parking lanes that some people use as right turn lanes. I’ve seen a few collisions between cars and cars, and cars and cyclists, because someone decides to drive in the parking lane to make a right hand turn.

Andrew
Guest
Andrew

The Stark crossing is majorly flawed as there are no physical dividers that force auto users heading south to make the right-only turn. A month back, I was going south on the route with my 13 month daughter on her bike seat behind me. We waited at the light next to the car, and when the light turned green, the car sped straight across instead of taking the right only turn. If we had been less attentive and had started fast, they would’ve hit us. Poorly designed and confusing. I’m disappointed in much of this bikeway.

Adam
Subscriber

I rode part of the route last night and missed a turn and got lost.

Thomas
Guest
Thomas

Agree with comments on the two-way bike lane on 30th between Alder and Stark. It needs major revisions.

Like many, I am trying to ride north/south to/from Ankeny. Originally I thought “hey great there will be a signal at 30th and Stark” but since implementation I have found myself crossing at 29th and Stark because while unsignalized, at least everyone knows what’s happening.

The blind turn at 30th and Stark is really disconcerting with poor sight triangles. Ditch the two-way bike lane and use a modified Toucan or other signal control device at this intersection.

Peter Hass
Guest
Peter Hass

I’ve tried this new 20’s route between Powell and I-84 area and was disappointed. (The whole thing sort of reminds me of the poorly designed bike lane between SW Stark and Burnside on 2nd.) I find using my old familiar routes of SE 16th or SE 34th to be easier. Sometimes I’ll take 20th and 21st…it’s way more direct but there’s a lot more car traffic to deal with. It’s too bad PBOT couldn’t have taken out the free parking on 20/21 and replaced it with bike lanes.