State wants help in effort to improve 82nd Avenue

82ndlead

Help is on the way.
(Photo: ODOT)

82nd Avenue is finally getting the attention is so badly deserves. The state-owned arterial is one of the City of Portland’s ten High Crash Corridors, a designation it has earned by being the place in Portland where you’re most likely to die or be seriously injured while walking.

But two projects might change that — and you might be able to help.

The Oregon Department of Transportation announced today they’re seeking members for the Community Advisory Committee for their 82nd Avenue of Roses Implementation Plan. That effort will identify transportation projects along a seven-mile stretch of 82nd from NE Killingsworth to Johnson Creek Blvd.

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Here’s more from ODOT about how the new committee will influence the process:

  • On-going input to ODOT about issues that should be addressed in the plan
  • Ideas about selection criteria, cross sections, and focus area project sets at key milestones
  • Guidance on the applicability and ability to implement the plan, as demonstrated through community support.
  • Avenues to share project information with the entities represented, to reach a wide range of project stakeholders.
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If you want to get involved, you have until July 15th to send in an application. To get one, contact ODOT project manager Terra Lingley at (503) 731-8232 and check the project website for more info.

On a separate front, Metro is well into their Powell-Division Transit and Development Project that aims to connect Portland to Gresham. Right now the most likely option is a bus rapid transit (BRT) line that would run east-west on inner Powell then jog up to Division on 82nd Avenue for 10 blocks. If the 82nd Avenue alignment moves forward, it would likely come with major capital investment that could include a new bikeway. (There’s an ongoing debate between Metro planners and the Bicycle Transportation Alliance about whether or not that would trigger the Oregon Bike Bill. More on that later.)

Both of these planning processes are likely to have a big impact on the future of 82nd Avenue. The extent to which bicycling figures into that future remains to be seen — and could depend on who steps up to advocate for it. Stay tuned.

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Founder of BikePortland (in 2005). Father of three. North Portlander. Basketball lover. Car owner and driver. If you have questions or feedback about this site or my work, feel free to contact me at @jonathan_maus on Twitter, via email at maus.jonathan@gmail.com, or phone/text at 503-706-8804. Also, if you read and appreciate this site, please become a supporter.

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ethan
ethan
8 years ago

Widen sidewalks. Add protected bike lanes. Eliminate all left turns. Use left-over space for BRT.

paikiala
paikiala
8 years ago

Reconsider the lane widths. 10-foot maximum unless curb side, then 11 foot maximum for buses and trucks.

Eric
Eric
8 years ago
Reply to  paikiala

9. What do you think this is, a freeway?

paikiala
paikiala
8 years ago

With limited right of way, it will be curious to see if anything constructive is proposed. I don’t see ODOT reducing the number of auto lanes.

rick
rick
8 years ago

82nd needs cycle tracks and lots more solar-compact trash cans. There is a lot of trash on the street and sidewalks. It needs more street trees.

gutterbunnybikes
8 years ago
Reply to  rick

I’m all for trees, but plant them wisely. I think of many on 82nd that need to be dropped because they completely block the view of 82nd at the intersections.

I’ve had to back (while driving) away from intersections to go around the block to where there was a clear view for crossing or turning onto 82nd more than once. In this situation, if on a bike I can at least take to the sidewalk to another block, but there are some completely blind corners for drivers on 82nd all because of trees.

RJ
RJ
8 years ago

Adequately spaced signal-protected pedestrian crossings.

The Duke
The Duke
8 years ago

I commute from near Johnson Creek and 82nd every day by bike, I’ll definitely be volunteering for a position on CAC and see if I can help drive the emphasis on safety for all road users.

kittens
kittens
8 years ago

I wonder what sort of a time-commitment one of these citizen advisory committees requires.

kittens
kittens
8 years ago
Reply to  kittens

Ooops, just found this if anyone is interested:

Time commitment
 Ability to meet for 2-3 hour monthly meetings during weekday evenings; occasional weekend activities may be planned

Responsibilities
 Attend 10-14 meetings between September 2015 and December 2016; attendance and preparation should take no more than four to six hours a month
 Participate in project-sponsored activities
 Prepare for each meeting by reviewing and reading meeting materials and documents before the meeting starts
 Adhere and respect the group decision-making processes and participation guidelines
 Communicate willingly and regularly about the project with other interested parties within your community
 Members must be able to provide their own transportation to meetings held near 82nd Avenue; efforts will be made to hold meetings in transit friendly locations

Robert
Robert
8 years ago

Any particular reason why the implementation plan wouldn’t just encompass all of 82nd where it is west of 205, i.e. extend a bit further south to reach, say, the Harmony / Sunnyside intersection?

Spiffy
Spiffy
8 years ago
Reply to  Robert

that section is newer, has bike lanes in most sections, and more traffic controls… I’ve ridden 82nd from Clackamas Town Center to the Springwater Trail numerous times (I used to work down there) and north of Johnson Creek is the biggest problem…

I actually prefer 82nd to the I-205 path in this section because it’s flat and it’s quieter than the freeway traffic…

coincidentally the Multnomah/Clackamas county line is right there between Johnson Creek and the Springwater Trail on Clatsop St… not sure if that matters in their coordination with the county…

Bjorn
Bjorn
8 years ago

I can’t wait to hear their suggestions, but I would guess the first one will be to just build a super expensive wall down the middle of all of 82nd. If there is any money left over they can spend it hiring folks to pat them on the back.

Spiffy
Spiffy
8 years ago
Reply to  Bjorn

“build a super expensive wall down the middle”

it worked for 99E… and it had the added bonus of making it an unofficial freeway…

Spiffy
Spiffy
8 years ago

replace the outside lane with a planting strip with trees and a bike lane… then you can move all the poles into the planting strip so you could actually have a usable sidewalk…

curb extensions at every cross-street…

enforce the front-facing fence height, which should encourage more pedestrian friendly businesses to move into the area…

davemess
davemess
8 years ago

I went to a few of the 82nd streetscape meetings last year. At one we were given voting clickers and asked “What is your top priority on 82nd?”. In a room of over 60 people, not one (including me) selected “improved bike access”. Many pro-bike folks in the crowd stated that they didn’t think 82nd was a fight worth having, as there are parallel facilities (even more so with Terry D’s proposed 70’s-80’s route).

I’m just saying to expect a difficult row to hoe on this one if you have dreams of cycle tracks.

Dwaine Dibbly
Dwaine Dibbly
8 years ago

At least they’re asking for help. Finally!

paikiala
paikiala
8 years ago
Reply to  Dwaine Dibbly

more like a check box on a funding document,
public involvement, check.

Hello, Kitty
Chris
8 years ago

The only practical hope for improving things for non-motorized users of 82nd is to remove at least one lane of traffic. And, given the politics, that doesn’t seem very practical.