Willamette Week reports on St. Johns Bridge

Ryan Hume at the Willamette Week did a great job with his story on the St. Johns Bridge and cyclists in this week’s Willy Week. I met with Ryan and exchanged several emails about the story and I can honestly say he is a solid reporter.

But I can’t resist commenting on his line that paraphrases Charles Sciscione, regional manager of ODOT.

he [Sciscione] doesn’t necessarily disagree [with an alternative plan that would be safer for bikes] but he believes there’s no better solution for a span that averages 24,000 cars and trucks a day.

No better solution? Wasn’t their a study done by an independent consulting group that said 4 full lanes will not reduce congestion and that the alternative was both safer and more efficient?

The real kicker is that Sciscione actually admits that the “lanes are too narrow,” than says, “but it’s a treasure.”

Mr. Sciscione, I realize you are just the messenger and that you’re heart may actually reside with the cyclists and pedestrians. But really, if the bridge is such a treasure (which I agree it is), than why would you follow through with a plan that doesn’t let anyone besides motorists to enjoy its grandeur without fearing for their life?

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Founder of BikePortland (in 2005). Father of three. North Portlander. Basketball lover. Car owner and driver. If you have questions or feedback about this site or my work, feel free to contact me at @jonathan_maus on Twitter, via email at maus.jonathan@gmail.com, or phone/text at 503-706-8804. Also, if you read and appreciate this site, please become a supporter.

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