Comment of the Week: Our surprising election

I think I found a perfect comment. Twenty-six other people liked it too, not to mention it received a COTW nomination. It’s short, sweet, and even manages to have some narrative structure. Here’s DW’s take from the day after the election:

I was feeling some dread over seeing the results of the vote on this particular issue. That was unfounded, and I think a result of just reading too many dumb comments on Reddit and Willamette Week.

Some coworkers and I were talking about the results of the election this morning. When the topic of the gas tax came up, I was low-key prepared to go on the defensive. Despite all of them exclusively driving to get around, they voted for it. Every one of them shared some project the city did that they liked – a new crosswalk in their neighborhood, speed bumps on their street, or a repaving project. One even said they like when the city stripes bike lanes because it makes people go slower. Keep in mind, these are people who never ride bikes and only walk occasionally for recreation.

I think the lesson for me here is that I need to get off the internet and talk to people in real life more.

Yep, DW might be on to something there.

In case folks missed the election followup, these results didn’t come in on some sliver of a low-turn out. No, at 36% Multnomah County had a strong showing for a primary election, especially given that it didn’t benefit from the boost of competitive presidential or gubernatorial races. I’ll go out on a limb, maybe all the talk about charter reform over the past couple of years, and the large numbers of candidates running for city council in the fall, has given voters a bit more awareness of elections.

Thank you for your comment, DW, and also thank you to everyone who has shared their election thoughts over the past few weeks. You can read DW’s comment in context of what everyone else said under the original post.

Lisa Caballero (Assistant Editor)

Lisa Caballero (Assistant Editor)

Lisa Caballero is on the board of SWTrails PDX, and was the chair of her neighborhood association's transportation committee. A proud graduate of the PBOT/PSU transportation class, she got interested in local transportation issues because of service cuts to her bus, the 51. Lisa has lived in Portland for 23 years and can be reached at lisacaballero853@gmail.com.

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Will the last bike commuter turn off their lights
Will the last bike commuter turn off their lights
15 days ago

Despite all of them exclusively driving to get around, they voted for it.

Given that the vast majority of this revenue will be used to make it more comfortable and convenient for them to drive, this makes complete sense.

Angus Peters
Angus Peters
15 days ago

Even though I voted against the gas tax I’m glad it passed. I voted against every tax measure as a protest against how wastefully and ineffectively our local tax dollars are being spent (Housing Bond, Homeless Tax, PCEF and preschool Tax). I want safer streets, PBL’s, swept bike lanes and no potholes. That being said I’m dubious the gas tax will make any of that happen but it would be even worse without it.
I don’t think the prospect of 12 new highly paid City Council members in the Fall election is what got at least some voters to pick up their pens. It was the DA race and the severe decline in livability in Portland. That’s what I heard from my neighbors. I hopeful Nathan Vasquez and the soon to end Measure 110 will push us towards a better path.

qqq
qqq
15 days ago

The only reservation I had about DW’s excellent advice to not view what you see on the internet as representative of reality is that I read it on the internet.

Watts
Watts
15 days ago
Reply to  qqq

With noting that this too is on the internet. Take it with a grain of salt.