Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

Council passes $5.1 million for Red Electric, Better Naito projects

Posted by on February 11th, 2021 at 4:39 pm

Breaking ground oh so soon.

On Wednesday, Portland City Council voted to allow construction to begin on Better Naito Forever and the Red Electric Trail Bridge — a total of $5.1 million in projects that include physically protected cycling space. But it didn’t happen before one last bit of drama.

“I can’t support this contract when I see the very limited number of people of color who will benefit.”
— Jo Ann Hardesty, city commissioner

The Better Naito project hit an unexpected bump when transportation commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty made the extremely rare move of voting against the contractor bid authorization. This was surprising not only because these procedural votes are usually unanimous; but because Hardesty is the commissioner-in-charge of PBOT, so she voted against a project from her own bureau.

Hardesty was concerned that the contractor chosen to do the $2.9 million job, Westech Construction Inc, had committed to award only 8.67% of the subcontracts to firms that qualify under the state’s Certification Office for Business Inclusion and Diversity (COBID). The City of Portland has an “aspirational goal” of 20% COBID firms. “I’m very excited we are going to do this project, this is a visionary project,” Hardesty said before voting, “But I can’t support this contract when I see the very limited number of people of color who will benefit.” Hardesty was also concerned that Westech plans to sub-contract out over 60% of the work.

All three other commissioners voted “yes” on the contract (Commissioner Dan Ryan was reluctant, given Hardesty’s concerns). Hardesty’s vote gave Mayor Ted Wheeler pause. “That puts me in a bit of a conundrum,” he said, “I usually defer to the commissioner-in-charge, but the commissioner has voted against it.” After taking a moment, he continued. “I’ll go with the majority because it’s an important project and has been in process for a long time.” Hardesty appeared to agree with Wheeler and nodded profusely throughout his remarks.

Advertisement

This bit of process now behind us, Better Naito Forever, which won unanimous City Council support back in October 2020 and will build an “iconic” (according to Mayor Wheeler), two-way protected bike lane on the east side of Naito Parkway and new sidewalk in Waterfront Park between the Hawthorne Bridge and NW Davis, will break ground this later this year.

Council has also authorized $2.3 million for construction of the Red Electric Trail Bridge project. As we shared last month, this project will create a new separated bike path between Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway and SW Capitol Highway. It allows riders and walkers to avoid a dangerous intersection and completes a key piece of the larger Red Electric Trail vision. Construction is planned to begin this spring.

Also on the council agenda was authorization of $1.9 million to build the Connected Cully project which will bring new sidewalks to NE Killingsworth and Prescott streets between NE 42nd and NE Cully. The project was on the agenda but didn’t receive a vote. It might have gotten pulled at the last minute. We’ll keep you posted on any updates.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
— Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
— Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

41
Leave a Reply

avatar
11 Comment threads
30 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
23 Comment authors
doug Bwas carlessrickNadia Maximmark smith Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Phil M
Guest
Phil M

Hardesty once again a “roadblock” to making things better for Portland as a whole. Glad this succeeded.

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

It won’t be nearly as good as a better better naito where all of the car traffic “shares” the three lanes on the west side of the existing median and we spend the money on something more worthwhile plus bonus: close the ramp onto the hawthorne bridge so that same car traffic can’t ruin transit service at SE cesar chavez. Looking kinda like that stick in the spokes meme here.

Suburban
Guest
Suburban

The bollards will be just fine there

SolarEclipse
Guest
SolarEclipse

Seems typical City top leadership, setting “aspirational goals” which mean little if they aren’t followed through with or administrative rules to enforce them.
Now we can see those “goals” are only for show and have no real substance. Unfortunately, all too common.

rick
Guest
rick

Everyone will benefit from not having to use that section of Barbur Boulevard every time when going north in the current condition. That is only if it gets built to be a bike-friendly connection. Remember the loose soil for the Sellwood bridge construction and that it went over budget and made the westside of it now feel more like a crosswalk at a freeway exchange?

Nadia Maxim
Guest
Nadia Maxim

Glad it passed despite the opposition of PBOT’s leader. Hardesty is an ideologue with only one arrow in her quiver (racial equity). Elected officials need to be able to chew gum and walk at the same time. I still want potholes filled and my 911 calls to be answered. We need to elect leaders who work together and actually get things done.

cmh89
Guest
cmh89

Only in Portland would semi-protected cycle track be called “iconic”.

Robert
Guest
Robert

I work in the construction industry and it is very much still a white man’s game. Minority, Women, and emerging small businesses don’t have a chance if we don’t hold the government accountable to inclusion targets. Less than half the goal of 20% is laughable. With the size of the contract, telling the GC to put a new team together to get closer to the goal would not kill the project.

Joe Adamski
Guest
Joe Adamski

Count to three.Old City Hall maxim. 3 votes passes, and there were 3 before the Mayor chimed in with #4. Commissioner Hardesty didn’t kill the measure,but she DID throw a penalty flag. Moving forward, other members of Council now understand it will need to take equity issues into consideration or risk losing Hardestys vote. Today,its symbolic, tomorrow it may cause a defeat of something that Commissioner or Mayor wants. I believe Comm Hardesty knows how to play ball,and win.

mark smith
Guest
mark smith

Unfortunately the commissioners had an opportunity to do the right thing and hold this vote up for a month while the contractor came back with a better number. But unfortunately his business as usual in Portland..

Honestly I think most of them were afraid to vote against it because it had to have an actual conversation on race reconciliation.. which is probably the opposite of what the white mayor wants to do

was carless
Guest
was carless

Awesome!

And this is a really big deal. The changes to downtown will be transformational.