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The Monday Roundup: Separation for seniors, friendly shops, corruption, and more

Posted by on June 17th, 2019 at 10:02 am

This week’s Monday Roundup is sponsored by the Gorge Pedal. You will not want to miss this event and ride on July 20th that will share the best of what the Gorge has to offer!

Here are the most noteworthy items we came across in the past seven days…

Oh Canada: Montreal’s network of physically protected bike lanes already makes it arguably the best biking city in North America. Now they plan to add 16 more miles of bikeways in the next two years by removing parking and reconfiguring lanes.

Friendly shops FTW: Portland’s River City Bicycles gets a well-deserved spotlight for is welcoming and inclusive vibe in this article from Bicycling Magazine on how bike shops need to “lose the attitude”.

NIMBY-speak: If you’ve attended a public meeting about a controversial issue you will definitely relate to this brilliant satire of how status-quo keepers like to talk.

How the Highway Industrial Complex rolls: US DOT Secretary Elaine Chao finally sold stock in a major road paving company after media coverage and public pressure forced her to.

More neighbors = more cycling: The NY Times editorial board says more cities should follow the lead of Minneapolis and outlaw single-family zoning.

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Say it louder for the folks in the back: “Make life easier for pedestrians, bikers, and mass transit users and encourage more commuters to shift modes and abandon their cars, and roads start to become unclogged.” That’s the takeaway from Curbed on a new report on urban congestion.

Paint is not protection: Britain’s cycling and walking commissioners tell policymakers that paint-only bike lanes are a waste of money. (If that’s true, Portland has thrown away a lot of money.)

Beyond bikeways: A bike advocacy group in Silicon Valley shares their realization that on some streets, pushing for a new bike lane might actually go against their stated mission.

Seniors will cycle with separation: A new study shows that having a physically protected space to ride is the top priority for older adults who want to use a bicycle for transportation.

Anti-bike political shenanigans: After they inexplicably scrubbed much of the pro-cycling language out of a transportation bill, a Minnesota lawmaker said his Republican colleagues, “Have a hostility to the bicycle as a mode of transportation. I don’t understand it.”

Tweet of the Week: There was a lot of competition this week. I decided to go with something light and fun…

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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AB
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AB

One of the key indications of a well-designed cycling network is if you see Grandma and Grandpa cycling with a little kid. Until you have that level of safety and confidence for the most vulnerable people, there is still work to be done. The Netherlands is a good example to learn from, though most American cities would need to be radically altered to make that happen.

Well-designed, very low-traffic Neighborhood Greenways seem like a decent compromise on a shoestring budget, but even they are not possible everywhere. Especially in the suburban areas.

X
Guest
X

The fietsorkest pilot is earning their pay. The trumpet is kind of hogging it but they sound pretty good for a 5 piece band on a bike.

MTW
Guest
MTW

“More neighbors = more cycling”. I don’t necessarily disagree with this position, but a recent trip to Los Angeles was pretty eye opening. There are some EXTREMELY dense tracts/neighborhoods which remain completely auto-dominated car sewers. It was pretty much the textbook definition of “density without urbanism.” No street life, no people walking around (there’s nowhere to walk around to), no bike lanes (certainly no PBLs.) The density was absolutely there, but everyone probably still used a car for most daily tasks.

FWIW, I think the “more neighbors = more cycling” position would be more true in Portland.

Bryan
Guest
Bryan

that NIMBY satire was hilariously sad. Free Forest Park.

Todd Boulanger
Guest
Todd Boulanger

Per Republicans in MN fighting cycling infrastructure…bicycle are about the most libertarian form of wheeled transportation (other than LDS wheel barrows)…

oldster
Guest
oldster

Oh boy, the bike shop snobbery article hit a nerve. It’s one of the most bafflingly immature things I can think of. Nobody is impressed that you work in a bike shop. I mean it’s not like you graduated from MIT. Give me 4 weeks and I’ll train any barista to do your entire job, including the mechanic’s bench. They might not have as much riding experience, but that’s not what you’re paid for. That’s not the job. The job is customer service. It’s amazing how many businesses seem bent on committing “suicide by Amazon” by keeping such employees around.

What can I do to impress you that I’m worthy of your attention, when all I have is a mere 40 years of experience with bikes? It’s that head of gray hair I’ve got, isn’t it? Somehow it’s leading you to the exactly wrong conclusion that I must be totally inexperienced. Maybe you think all the old people were simply created on the day you were born? No, I’m pretty sure I was tearing apart bottom brackets when you were sucking your thumb and talking nonsense. Which was last Saturday.

Speaking of our age difference, I also, definitely, didn’t come in here to help you act out your unresolved daddy issues. Although in his defense, if he’s ignorant of bikes, it might be because he’s confined to the car in which he drives his crappy commute to the good-paying job that paid for all the resources you absorbed for 20 years without ever saying thanks, and by the time he gets home to the overpriced suburban house you grew up in with your other spoiled-rotten siblings, with the lawn that needs mowing and the gutters that need cleaning, maybe he doesn’t have time for any other hobbies.

Anyway, yeah, Amazon does the job for me now. The “no service” Amazon provides, is literally better than what you’re providing. I don’t love Jeff Bezos, but when I order bikes & parts from Amazon it’s with relish, not with wistfulness like the guy in the article. It tastes of sweet, sweet justice. Because after how you treated me, I want you to lose your job. I want your shop to close down. And since we’re fantasizing, I want you to have to get a job at the very Amazon warehouse that packs my box, and have to pee in a bottle because there’s no time for bathroom breaks, and hopefully you get heatstroke, and because you got heatstroke, they fire you from that job too. Not fair, is it?

If you’re offended by this, then it’s absolutely directed at you.

One day maybe cycling will grow up into a real adult industry with real money at stake. All you have to do, is quit being jackoffs.

Glenn II
Guest
Glenn II

The San Jose story and the Curbed story both illustrate the same point: Every effort to get people out of cars or to get their cars out of the way, needs to provide good public transit for them to switch to. The next complaint is always, “That’s expensive…” but on the other hand, if everybody currently throwing away 30% and 40% of their income on buying and owning cars, were to pay into it just a fraction of that, we could have buses every 5 minutes with velvet seats, a concierge and a snack bar onboard. And people can certainly bike too, but if your commute is longer than about 2-3 miles (and in the Bay Area I don’t doubt it), you need that public transit link. So it needs to be a multi-modal approach at all times!

Lance
Guest
Lance

I understand why Seniors would want separation and friendly shops, but I don’t understand why Seniors would want corruption?

“Seniors want separation, friendly shops, corruption, and more”

MARK SMITH
Guest
MARK SMITH

It’s bike shop Bros that are generally against bike infra.

Dave
Guest
Dave

I will tell it to you in words that many bike store customers (and owners!) may understand:
You. Get. What. You. Are. Willing. To. Pay. For.

oldster

Oh boy, the bike shop snobbery article hit a nerve. It’s one of the most bafflingly immature things I can think of. Nobody is impressed that you work in a bike shop. I mean it’s not like you graduated from MIT. Give me 4 weeks and I’ll train any barista to do your entire job, including the mechanic’s bench. They might not have as much riding experience, but that’s not what you’re paid for. That’s not the job. The job is customer service. It’s amazing how many businesses seem bent on committing “suicide by Amazon” by keeping such employees around.What can I do to impress you that I’m worthy of your attention, when all I have is a mere 40 years of experience with bikes? It’s that head of gray hair I’ve got, isn’t it? Somehow it’s leading you to the exactly wrong conclusion that I must be totally inexperienced. Maybe you think all the old people were simply created on the day you were born? No, I’m pretty sure I was tearing apart bottom brackets when you were sucking your thumb and talking nonsense. Which was last Saturday.Speaking of our age difference, I also, definitely, didn’t come in here to help you act out your unresolved daddy issues. Although in his defense, if he’s ignorant of bikes, it might be because he’s confined to the car in which he drives his crappy commute to the good-paying job that paid for all the resources you absorbed for 20 years without ever saying thanks, and by the time he gets home to the overpriced suburban house you grew up in with your other spoiled-rotten siblings, with the lawn that needs mowing and the gutters that need cleaning, maybe he doesn’t have time for any other hobbies.Anyway, yeah, Amazon does the job for me now. The “no service” Amazon provides, is literally better than what you’re providing. I don’t love Jeff Bezos, but when I order bikes & parts from Amazon it’s with relish, not with wistfulness like the guy in the article. It tastes of sweet, sweet justice. Because after how you treated me, I want you to lose your job. I want your shop to close down. And since we’re fantasizing, I want you to have to get a job at the very Amazon warehouse that packs my box, and have to pee in a bottle because there’s no time for bathroom breaks, and hopefully you get heatstroke, and because you got heatstroke, they fire you from that job too. Not fair, is it?If you’re offended by this, then it’s absolutely directed at you.One day maybe cycling will grow up into a real adult industry with real money at stake. All you have to do, is quit being jackoffs.Recommended 8