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State of Oregon finalizes funding list for Safe Routes to School projects

Posted by on January 17th, 2019 at 7:51 am

(Image: ODOT)

The State of Oregon has finalized its first batch of Safe Routes to School projects funded through the $5.3 billion transportation package passed by legislators in 2017.

Region 1 (which covers all of Portland) will receive $3.39 million for four projects that will make it easier and safer for kids to walk and bike to class. ODOT awarded nearly $16 million for 24 projects statewide. Demand for these funds far outstripped supply as the agency received a total of 112 project applications requesting a total of $85 million.

Projects within a one-mile radius of schools are eligible for funding and schools where children come from low-income households were prioritized. Projects also scored high if they demonstrated an acute safety need, had “shovel-ready” status, and if they would benefit elementary and middle schools.

Here’s the list of Region 1 projects (view the full list here):

Multnomah County: Crossing enhancements for Reynolds Middle School – $90,957

Clackamas County: Sidewalks, ramps, rapid flashing beacons, and pedestrian refuge islands for Whitcomb Elementary School – $148,470

City of Portland: Sidewalks for Alder Elementary School – $2,000,000

City of Milwaukie: Sidewalks, enhanced crossings, crossing beacons, and bike lanes for Linwood Elementary School – $1,152,330

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All the project sponsors will be required to raise matching funds. As written, the law requires a 40% match; but sponsors can have that reduced to 20% if their project meets certain criteria. All the Region 1 projects qualify for the 20% match reduction (the City of Milwaukie has not requested the reduction). (Note: This matching funds issue has been a sticking point for Safe Routes advocates and the current legislative session includes Senate Bill 561, which seeks to decrease the match amount for all projects.)

This is the first allocation for ODOT’s Safe Routes to School Competitive Grant Program (PDF) and it covers the 2019-2020 cycle. The funds will double to $30 million for the next two-year cycle in 2021.

The full list is expected to be approved by the Oregon Transportation Commission at their meeting in Salem today (1/17).

Portland will add this project to its own, $8 million list of Safe Routes to School projects announced back in June.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Michael Whitesel
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Michael Whitesel

Why does it cost $2,000,000 for sidewalks for one school? It seems a more judicious use of funds would allow more projects to be completed.

johnny burrell
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johnny burrell

What about the need at Tubman Middle School?

David Hampsten
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I noticed that Alder Elementary is also part of the Reynolds School District. Assuming they rebuild part of 174th, any idea how much of the $2 million will be spent to fix streets and sidewalks in nearby Gresham?

9watts
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First vehicle stopped at the cross walk in the picture above has a Washington plate. Hm.

Tom
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Tom

City of Portland: Sidewalks for Alder Elementary . Sidewalks are usually less than 250k per mile. Are they building 8 miles of sidewalk?

David Hampsten
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When we were in the middle of the EPIM process in 2012, we got several cost estimates for a 6-foot wide concrete sidewalk:
– If you are DIY and mixing the concrete yourself, the cost is about $50K/mile on one side of the street.
– If you hire a contractor to do it, with permits it’s about $125K/mile on one side.
– If you are the City of Gresham, it’s about $250K/mile on one side, curb or no curb.
– If you are the City of Portland (PBOT), it’s about $650K/mile on one side with a curb.
– If you are ODOT, it’s about $1.2 million/mile on one side with a curb already there.
– If you are City of Portland (PBOT) and there is no curb, it’s about $7 million/mile to put in a curb, sewers, ramps, and a proper sidewalk.

soren
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soren

Region 1 has ~54% of Oregon’s population but gets ~22% of safe route to schools funding this cycle.

horseheel3
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horseheel3

The url to the pdf of the award list is title 2019-2020, but the pdf file itself has a date of 1.17.18

Where did this document come from? If I try to google for Safe routes to school awards the SRTS website says they’ll make awards later this spring.

horseheel3
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horseheel3

ah, i see, it’s real, that’s just a typo.

thanks.

joan
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So Alder Elementary School and Reynolds Middle School are in the Reynolds District, and Whitcomb Elementary and Linwood Elementary are in the North Clackamas District. So ODOT isn’t funding anything in Portland Public Schools, the largest district in Oregon.

Is that because Portland schools will be covered through the Portland SRTS project? Did the city not apply for any schools in Portland for state funding?

Stephen
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Stephen

Am I reading this wrong, or did Washington county really get zilch? I have a real need in my neighborhood for safe routes to school – no bike lanes, no sidewalks until halfway to school, drainage ditches on either side of the narrow roads, so I was really looking forward to funding here.

Babygorilla
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Babygorilla

Toby Keith
And you find this surprising? A city this size bordering our neighbor state and we should be surprised to find Washington drivers? What are you suggesting?Recommended 5

The comment could be suggesting that it is a sign of bad system wide planning if interstate travelers somehow find themselves in zones which conflict with school children traveling to or from neighborhood schools instead of utilizing larger or arterial streets.