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Police arrest three men after ‘boobytrap’ injures bicycle rider on I-205 path

Posted by on November 10th, 2018 at 10:47 am

Victim says she saw the three men run up this hill just south of Division St MAX station.

Portland Police say three men stretched woven string across the I-205 path last night in an intentional act that caused an injury to a bicycle rider.

Here’s more from the statement just released by the PPB:

On Friday, November 9, 2018, at 10:53 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report a bicyclist was injured as a result of a boobytrap that was erected across the Interstate 205 Multi-Use Path near Southeast Division Street.

Officers and emergency medical personnel arrived and located an injured adult female. Emergency medical responders provided the victim on scene medical treatment. Officers learned the victim was traveling north while riding her bicycle on the Interstate 205 Multi-Use Path when she became entangled and injured by material strung across the path.

As an officer canvased the area, he located woven string that spanned the path just south of Southeast Division Street. During the investigation, officers also located three suspects believed to have positioned the woven string across the path. The three suspects were taken into custody without incident.

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L to R: Justin Jones, Antonio R Tolman-Duran, Dakota Murphy

Police arrested 23-year-old Justin J. Jones, 27-year-old Justin R. Tolman-Duran, and 21-year-old Dakota E. Murphy. All three were booked into jail (and have since been released) on charges of Assault in the Fourth Degree and three counts of Reckless Endangering.

This is not the first time bicycle riders have faced human-caused hazards on the 205 path. In July 2017 a man was the victim of verbal and vehicular assault when a another man drove his car onto the path about 1.3 miles south of Division.

And we’ve seen similar trip-wire incidents in several other locations. In September 2017 we reported on wires placed across a trail in Gateway Green and a cross an intersection in northeast Portland. In 2014 the Portland Police Bomb Squad responded to a wire strung across a public trail near private homes in Forest Park. In 2010 someone strung a trip-wire across a street next to Ladd Circle, a location where neighbors had complained about bicycle users not obeying a stop sign.

If you come across something on a path or in a park that appears to be a booby trap, call Portland Park Rangers at (503) 823-1637 or the PPB’s non-emergency line at (503) 823-3333. Call 911 if there’s an immediate safety hazard or if you see a crime in progress.

(P.S. If you’re paying attention, behavior like this should not be a surprise. When we allow hate toward bicycle users to become normalized (as it is in comment sections in every local media outlet), this is one way it manifests. It might be fun/funny for some people to wish injury (even death) upon other people for no other reason than riding a bicycle; but it’s not funny at all when those feelings are acted upon.)


UPDATE, 12:05pm: The victim is Montavilla resident Carlene Ostedegaard. According to her partner, she was riding home from work (on Foster) when it happened. The location was just south of the Division MAX stop. “It was a couple passes of twine or thin rope at about the face/neck level,” Ostedegaard’s friend told me.

She was riding north and saw the three men run up a hill.

Here are photos of her injuries:

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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PATRICK
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PATRICK

This is a very bad location because it is downhill and bike speeds can be high. I was surprised going through the underpass two weeks ago by a camp that extended half way into the path. There were also loiters on the other side of the path. It may be an area where some campers claim the space without recognizing bikers rights to transverse.

Dan America
Guest
Dan America

Wrong photo given the location of the incident was actually just south of Divison St on the path.

Bruce
Guest
Bruce

In October of 2015, I got to flip over my bike underneath Strawberry Lane overpass on 205 path in Gladstone when I hit some construction equipment either left on the path or put there. Not fun for weeks thereafter. Spot has subsequently added lighting so you can see anything strewn on path.

John Mulvey
Guest
John Mulvey

Columbo
The camps (and their mountains of trash) have been encroaching on the path lately, mostly on the north side. I’ve seen people intentionally kicking gravel onto the path from the ODOT access road that leads down there, and I’ve even seen someone deliberately place broken chunks of cinder block in the path. I try to stop and remove this stuff when I come across it, but I’m also increasingly wary of being attacked.Recommended 0

Your basis for assuming that acts of these three suspects have anything to do with homeless people in the area…?

PS. You’re not going to be attacked. Try to get a grip.

John Mulvey
Guest
John Mulvey

Sounds like you’re sick of people calling out your bigotry.

When you read a story about three housed people committing an assault, your response is to go on a tirade about homeless people. There’s your “antisocial behavior.” Stop doing that.

Bryan Hance (The Bike Index)
Subscriber

Justin Jones – many prior arrests: menacing, concealed weapons, interfering public transit, theft

Tolman-Duran – couple of prior “theft of services” arrests

Dakota Murphy, just the one.

B. Carfree
Guest
B. Carfree

Why isn’t this an Assault 3 charge, which is a felony?

ORS 163.165 (1) A person commits the crime of assault in the third degree if the person:
(e) While being aided by another person actually present, intentionally or knowingly causes physical injury to another

Clearly the cops believe the three of them acted together and were all present and knowingly caused physical injury to another. Why are they charging it down as a misdemeanor, especially when these charming young men have priors (including menacing)?

I suspect the reason is that our cops cannot envision themselves or their families riding bikes and being victimized by such a booby trap, so they take it less seriously. Maybe one of our legal beagles can set me straight on why such a violent crime is charged at such a low level.

Christine
Guest
Christine

How horrible to have that happen! At night time too! Everything from it’s a bad prank to I’m going to get raped, robbed, and/or killed.

Fozman
Guest
Fozman
Mark
Guest
Mark

From what I read, and the pictures of the ladies neck, I think they should be charged with attempted murder. It looks like that was set up as a garrote cord. They basically tried to decapitate her. I have heard of situations where people on snowmobiles have been decapitated by fence wires. It can also kill by crushing windpipe and knocking person unconscious when the fall off the bike. Those boys need to spend some time in the state pen. And if your prosecutor doesn’t try to put them there, then you probably need a new prosecutor.

Bjorn
Guest
Bjorn

According to a group that has been working towards improving public safety in Montavilla all 3 of the accused were camping near where the tripwire was set. Seems pretty clear that some of the homeless folks along this stretch of the path are trying to make it unusable so they can own it as their territory similar to what has happened by the tunnel under sandy near the parkrose transit center. Totally unacceptable in my opinion.

Wylie Dulmage
Guest
Wylie Dulmage

Not sure which post you read because no one was talking about punching down, they were talking about making their bike path useable again. Making the 205 path safe for riding doesn’t mean exterminate homeless people. It really is tragic, I don’t even bother riding on it ever anymore, wondering when the city will decide that the 205 multi use path is a resource that should be safe to ride and walk on for everyone.

Ex-Port
Guest
Ex-Port

Glad I don’t live in Port Land, anymore. It’s gloomy.

Tyler Bradford
Guest
Tyler Bradford

I’m a little surprised here. Have we become so numbed to the definition of the word, by the ever-increasing severity of these kind of incidents in our culture, that we don’t even think to call this what it is?

It’s terrorism. It’s literally a textbook definition of a terrorist attack

Sure, there’s no IEDs. There’s no assault rifles. There’s not an institutional religious or governmental angle. But it sure sounds like…

“the use of intentionally indiscriminate violence as a means to create terror among masses of people”.

We’re those people. And this is unacceptable. And if Portland metro, Multnomah County, and the state of Oregon want anyone to believe that Vision Zero isn’t anything other than political grandstanding, these people need to be tried as terrorists.

Joe Adamski
Guest
Joe Adamski

Sadly, the current state of affairs lessens the desires to move forward on other projects for fear they too will suffer the same fate.

Lisa
Guest
Lisa

Carlene, If you’re reading this, I hope this message finds you feeling better. So sorry this happened to you. <3

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

Is it possible to be tolerant of (and compassionate towards) the homeless and campers, but be intolerant of violence, aggression, and antisocial behavior?

Trebor
Guest
Trebor

I stopped taking the section under Sandy Blvd. It’s easier to cut through Maywood Park anyways, and it avoids the section of path under Sandy that is narrowed by virtue of the fact that people are living there.

Once was enough for me taking the section between the Gateway Transit Center and SE Stark. The Glisan intersection is particularly nasty as the people turning north onto the freeway are simply not looking to the right. I cut through the transit center and take 99th down to SE Market and rejoin the path on the other side of the Market bridge. It’s far from perfect, but it avoids the one really bad section of the 205 path.

X
Guest
X

What frame of mind must a person be in to commit acts that will bring heat on them personally, for instance an assualt charge, and inevitably get their camp rousted? Assuming that they were living in the vicinity which we Do Not Know. Maybe they were just hanging with somebody who squats there?

Note: the three people who were arrested are accused, not convicted. I’m appalled by what happened to a person riding through on their bike. That doesn’t change the fact that the police don’t always get it right. In this case the usual number of suspects was, yep, three, and here are three guys. Voila, let’s call them bad names and crap all over their facebook page. Maybe it’s a righteous bust and they had a big ball of similar string on them. I don’t know but neither do the shit-talkers above.

maxD
Guest
maxD

I believe that for a City to succeed, most people, including the govenment and the police, need to buy into a common understanding of civic life. For Portland, as I understand it, the government will provide safe, functional streets and support alternative transportation, acceess to good local schools, a robust network of clean, safe outdoor spaces, and a favorable small business environment. In exchange, the City has an Urban Growth Boundary to keep development more compact and affordable, and taxes. In exchange for denser living, we get great openspaces, and train/bus/bike network. So far, it has worked out pretty well, but the institutional racism and the effects of the opioid crisis have caught up to us. People have lost confidence in the police, and attempts to keep our streets safe and our parks and openspaces safe and clean have largely stalled. IMO, addressing this is critical to Portland’s future. We cannot afford to relinquish our parks and openspaces or our parks. I agree that we must provide a place for people to sleep, but it should not come at such a high cost to our society. This a classic Tragedy of the Commons example. I propose using as many parking garages as necessary on an emergency basis until more permanent solutions can be found. These could be filled with cots, partitions, and they have shelter and electricity. They are close to services and are easy to maintain. With this option, camping in parks, on beaches, and along trails would not longer be tolerated. If the City cannot keep its openspaces clean and safe, and if walking, biking and riding transit become so fraught and unsafe that women and children do not feel welcome, Portland is going to start seeing people either moving out to the suburbs, or relying more on cars for necessary trips and even to get to safe places to walk or be in nature. Not adressing this urgently is very bad our city, and leaving peopel to set up their own camps in any corner of the CIty to suffer alone with addiciton is not really helping them, either.

Matthew in PDX
Guest
Matthew in PDX

I have ridden along the I-205 path, the Springwater and other paths many times since moving to Portland in 2014. I have not personally been assaulted by anyone along these paths, but I typically ride I-205 on a weekend in the morning, between say 8.30 a.m. and 11.30 a.m. Springwater is a commuting corridor for me. Being male and riding on a weekend morning maybe what has saved me, I find the homeless that camp along I-205 are less active in the morning hours.

That said, there is a crisis along the I-205 MUP, which would not be tolerated if it were a motor vehicle thoroughfare. I don’t know what the solution is, if there were simple solutions, the crisis would have been resolved by now. What I do believe is:
– Many/most of the homeless people camping are current drug users and many have mental health issues as a result of, or exacerbated by, illegal drug use.
– Homeless shelters will not admit people who are currently using drugs.
– Salt Lake City and San Francisco are reported to have had some success addressing homelessness, but in neither case was it easy, cheap or quick. Salt Lake City developed strategic partnerships with LDS groups wanting to undertake outreach – this probably wouldn’t be acceptable in Portland.

Welsh Pete
Guest
Welsh Pete

Its very clear Portland is experiencing compassion fatigue due to incidents such as this. Sweeping the area of camps will only move the problem and create further stress. Maybe its time for a Critical Mass along 205. Once a week, to let campers know, bicyclists are going to use this path safely, monitor what’s going on and we will have to find a way to co-exist.

Bald One
Guest
Bald One

I am so pleased to frequently see over the past several weeks “Park Rangers” in uniform, on patrol, walking the Eastbank Esplande. I sometimes give them a shout out and a thank you. It has made a great difference, but how long will it last?

Bike paths in Portland area fall into such a hodge podge of law enforcement jurisdiction. It’s no coincidence that homeless camps and bike paths go together so well – take a (sometimes) sheltered, car-free, out-of-sight, away-from-police car-patrol, path and put it on a county line, a city border, freeway easement, greenspace, wetland reclaim, or riverway, and you essentially create a difficult multi-jurisdiction no-mans-land where the car-centered politicians and law enforcement don’t care to look. What if we had similar issues in car tunnels and underpasses?

I see this all the time – it’s way too convenient for the local enforcement agency to point the finger at another agency and shrug, “not our problem – go call Parks (ODOT)(Sheriff)(PPB) – it’s their problem”. Maybe Metro needs a bike path safety force?

X
Guest
X

Do the Portland Police have any plan for the situation on local MUPs?

Does anybody believe this “fuck with the homeless” scenario supplied by the tripwire suspect(s)? It’s not a sensible statement. People who live in Vancouver don’t usually hang out on the I-205 bikepath harassing so-called homeless people.