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People on Bikes – NE Broadway near Moda Center

Posted by on January 25th, 2017 at 12:57 pm

Eager to ride after winter storms, yet still cold enough to have to bundle up. This us just a tiny slice of who’s riding bikes in Portland.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

How good does it feel to be able to pedal bikes again after all those snow and ice storms?

This is the first full week we’ve had since early December where the roads are dry and we can get back to a somewhat normal commute (yes, we know about all the gravel and we have a story about that coming up next). To kick off the return of fellow riders to the bike lanes, I thought it’d be fun to do a People on Bikes. This is a regular feature where I stand in one place and photographing people as they roll by. There are a lot of cool things we can learn from this. Here are some of the questions I have in my head as I look at the images:

– Who’s riding? And perhaps more importantly, who’s not riding?
– Are people riding fast (hunched-over) or slow (more upright)? And what does that say about our infrastructure?
– Do most people wear “cycling clothes” or just regular clothes?
– Does everyone wear a helmet?
– What type of bike set-ups do people prefer? Drop-bar road bikes? Racks or backpacks? Skinny tires or fat? Any e-bikes?

All these images were taken between 4:45 and 5:15 pm on Tuesday. I was standing on the grass to the south of the eastbound path of the Broadway Bridge as it comes to Larrabee (just before the Moda Center parking lot).

Have a look for yourself and let us know if you spot any trends or have interesting insights. Happy scrolling!

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β€” Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are productive, considerate, and welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you β€” Jonathan

112 Comments
  • Avatar
    Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 1:08 pm

    These people look typical of winter commuters I encounter. What astounds me is how much they wear — I would burn up if I wore anywhere near as much as they do.

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      Matt McLaughlin January 25, 2017 at 1:20 pm

      Commuting is usually low intensity over short distances. For some, that’s not enough activity to keep them toasty. That said, I’m always looking for ways to reduce layers but increase heat/dry.

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      Stephen Keller January 25, 2017 at 1:20 pm

      Now that’s funny! I was just thinking the opposite. We must live on opposite ends of the comfort spectrum.

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      John Lascurettes January 25, 2017 at 2:29 pm

      I wear three layers (this week anyway), all with zippers so I can open them up as I heat up. I never wear anything under my helmet (and I’m bald) as my head gets way to hot even with just a helmet (with no cover) on, even in sub freezing temps.

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      El Biciclero January 28, 2017 at 10:43 am

      I usually look about like #8 when I’m taking my kid to school (2/3 mile one way), but then more like #14 (minus the jacket, unless it’s raining) on my way to work (12 miles).

      The thing I always wonder about when I see these collections of photos is my bike fit. I always feel like a lean, mean, gliding machine while I’m riding, but I get a sense that if I saw myself in one of these shots, it would be like hearing my own recorded voice: “do I really look that dorky/scrunched/pained/overstretched…?”

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    Lester Burnham January 25, 2017 at 1:17 pm

    And for the most part good use of helmets.

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      Eric Leifsdad January 26, 2017 at 11:20 am

      Well, none of them are on backwards but three are being worn in the purely ceremonial manner.

      At least 6 people seem to have realized that invisible helmets are more effective in traffic.

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    Andrew Kreps January 25, 2017 at 1:19 pm

    I uuh…never stopped riding. πŸ˜€

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    CaptainKarma January 25, 2017 at 1:23 pm

    A lot more folks are smiling than in the morning cuz here they are going home! (Or to the pub)

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    bikeninja January 25, 2017 at 1:31 pm

    Notice how few of the these winter commuters are wearing “clipless” cycling shoes and matching pedals. I think that when the rubber meets the road Grant Peterson is right.

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    Goff January 25, 2017 at 1:34 pm

    Love seeing all the fenders. That’s the first place I look to determine experienced commuters from newbies or folks that might not ride as much.

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      Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 1:42 pm

      Today was dry.

      Experienced people might bring out faster bikes without fenders when the weather allows. I know I do.

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      • Adam
        Adam January 25, 2017 at 2:05 pm

        Since when do fenders slow you down? πŸ˜‰

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          Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 2:21 pm

          They are useless weight, an aero penalty, and they make noise.

          The difference is negligible at lower speeds but as you add speed and incline, it becomes more noticeable. As you extend distances saving a few tenths of a mph here and there adds up. Plus it’s more fun to feel more sporty.

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            Goff January 25, 2017 at 2:35 pm

            Are we talking about commuting here or a fantasy race to somewhere? Fenders make sense in the PNW year round, for the kind of riding I do, which is mostly commuting and spirited weekend rides. And I don’t ride slow.

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              Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 3:13 pm

              They are absolutely not needed most of the time. I bike commuted over 40 miles/day year ’round for over 10 years, though current commute is less than half that.

              Fenders do not change a fast rider to a slow rider, and removing them will not make a slow person fast. But the little choices improves the speed and fun factor.

              Ride a tank, mount heavy flat resistant tires, carry a bunch of junk you don’t need, wear too much and let that flap in the wind and even a strong rider gets slowed down a lot. That’s great for people who enjoy that, but I like to feel sporty.

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                B. Carfree January 25, 2017 at 8:58 pm

                I thought this would interest you. Jan Heine spent some time in the wind tunnel at UW. I wonder if any riders are now going to sport only front fenders in order to improve their aero?

                “Well-mounted metal fenders do not affect the bike’s aerodynamics. The front section of each fender shields the tire and reduces the wind resistance, while the rear fender increases the aerodynamic drag. The two effects cancel each other.”

                https://janheine.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/aerodynamics-of-real-world-bicycles/

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                Specialized Hardrock January 25, 2017 at 11:44 pm

                Seems like when I don’t have a rear fender I get a stripe of wet mud, etc on my butt. I’d prefer rear fender if I could only have one.

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                Kyle Banerjee January 26, 2017 at 10:33 am

                A couple thoughts. First of all, I agree with their observations on where the real aero gains are. I agree with everyone here that fenders are not a significant source of air resistance. Having said that, wind tunnels are not realistic environments. In real life, air hits you from all kinds of angles that shift continuously in terms of both direction and magnitude. Looking too closely at wind tunnel data for understanding bike aerodynamics is like focusing entirely on physics equations for figuring out how to climb hills — it’s helpful for understanding, but misses important elements.

                The contention in the article that “The front section of each fender shields the tire and reduces the wind resistance” needs a bit more elaboration. For the rear tire, sure. But for the front tire, someone explain exactly what is being shielded? The way front fenders are mounted, it works like an air scoop. The mounts introduce a small amount of drag, and the fenders themselves will too as you introduce more air from the sides. Don’t forget lots of people run huge flaps on their fenders.

                This corresponds with my experience. Over many years, my fendered speeds have never matched speeds without them even if I can move right along either way and see others doing the same.

                Plus, they add another 1-2lbs to the bike. Why do that if it’s not necessary? Ride with slightly larger/heavier bags, an oversized pump, carry just a little extra more than you need and we’re talking adding extraneous weight that’s the same as a gallon of milk as well as additional aero penalties. That will noticeably slow you down.

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              Dan A January 26, 2017 at 9:05 am

              My regular road bike won’t take permanent fenders, only the strap-on kind, which are fussy. I have a rain bike with fenders mounted on. The rain bike is much heavier, and doesn’t have as wide a range of gears, so it’s much less fun for me to ride. I use the regular road bike as much as I can.

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            Bicylist Mama Carie January 25, 2017 at 3:56 pm

            #34 & #39 don’t need to worry about the fender noise, both ears have buds in them. hiss boo. I like fender so my jacket/shirt doesn’t get a mess, with all the gravel and such.

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            pengo January 26, 2017 at 12:42 pm

            Also toe overlap.

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          Specialized Hardrock January 25, 2017 at 11:41 pm

          Once I ran over a piece of metal in the road and somehow it apparently came up, got into the fender and stopped the front wheel instantly. Over the handlebars I went. I was bleeding and pretty slow after that. πŸ™‚ That was on a road bike with very little clearance between the tire and fender. Try to get lots of space between the tire and the fender – one of the reasons I prefer riding Mountain Bike now – I’m leery of fenders that are close to the tire.

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            Chris I January 26, 2017 at 9:33 am

            Did you have plastic breakaway mounts for the fender?

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              Specialized Hardrock January 26, 2017 at 1:04 pm

              No. Actually it folded the fender up between the top of the tire and the fork. Instant stop.

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      dan January 25, 2017 at 2:06 pm

      I just put proper fenders on my bike after 10+ years of year-round commuting…because I am now towing a dog in a trailer and I didn’t want to spray him in the face. Crummy “keep most of the crud off me” plastic clip ons were fine for 10 years, and about $150 cheaper after installation, but the pooch is worth it.

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        Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 4:11 pm

        If I towed a dog, I’d run fenders full time.

        Stripping fenders might get you a few tenths of a mph if your cruising speed is around 20. At dog towing speeds, weight and aero difference won’t be measurable. And more importantly as you bring up, it’s better for the dog.

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          dan January 26, 2017 at 1:18 am

          But you have no idea how fast I tow that dog!!
          …let’s just say that the granny gear gets a workout on the hills πŸ˜‰

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            Kyle Banerjee January 26, 2017 at 1:28 pm

            I’ve encountered many cyclists towing dogs over the years, many of them very strong.

            I have yet to see someone tow a dog fast. Handling and safety issues (particularly for the dog) aside, I’d guess the dog wouldn’t like it.

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    Mereorite January 25, 2017 at 1:36 pm

    So much black/dark clothing! Why don’t folks make more of an effort to be visible? There’s so much going on in the shared road space that I’ll do anything I can do to be seen when I cycle.

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      Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 1:44 pm

      Also interesting how few people wear eye protection.

      Mirrors are basically nonexistent in this sample. Knowing what cars are doing is enormously useful for dealing with them.

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      • Adam
        Adam January 25, 2017 at 2:07 pm

        Who needs a mirror when you can just turn your head?

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          Kyle Banerjee January 25, 2017 at 2:28 pm

          I’ll ride without a helmet before I ride without a mirror.

          A mirror allows you to know exactly what everyone is doing all the time without turning your head. You can see subtle changes in movement indicating what drivers intend to do. You can time interactions based on traffic patterns far behind you. It is an excellent defense against the right hook.

          When people intend to buzz me, I move *towards* them — partly to create space for me to work, but partly because I can manage the encounter down to the inch. This messes with drivers since they don’t know I’m doing this on purpose

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          • TonyT
            TonyT January 25, 2017 at 4:45 pm

            Often that’s why I do where my helmet. My mirror is on my helmet and I really miss it when I don’t where a helmet. I used to be the “why don’t you turn your head” person, but then I got a stiff neck that lasted a while so I put the mirror on. Plus I made it with a spoke and a beer bottle cap and it gets a strange number of compliments.

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          Matti January 25, 2017 at 9:34 pm

          …because when you turn your head, you can’t see what’s in front of you… A quick glance at a mirror doesn’t require losing concentration on what’s coming ahead.

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            Specialized Hardrock January 25, 2017 at 11:47 pm

            AND when I turn my head I usually veer off course a bit. Not good.

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              Ryan January 26, 2017 at 3:08 pm

              I talked to a bike shop owner on the coast a few years back. He said most of the bike accidents he heard of along the 101 of bike tourists were at least partially caused by turning their heads. There are many sections where the shoulders along the road are quite narrow, with cars going really fast, and when cyclists turn their heads to check traffic they’d either veer off the side of the road and crash (especially when they see how fast and close the cars are and then panic), or veer into the path of traffic and…

              Needless to say he highly recommended mirrors.

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    • Adam
      Adam January 25, 2017 at 2:07 pm

      I wear black in the winter because it does not look wet after riding in the rain. I also wear black in the summer because it does not show sweat. Black is the most versiile color for everyday riding.

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      • Hello, Kitty
        Hello, Kitty January 25, 2017 at 4:34 pm

        I wear black on the outside because it’s how I feel on the inside.

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          q January 25, 2017 at 10:41 pm

          Explaining why you wear black could make for an interesting song.

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          • Hello, Kitty
            Hello, Kitty January 26, 2017 at 12:40 am

            I should totally start a New Wave band.

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              Brian January 26, 2017 at 10:04 am

              I think an Oregonian Black Metal band would be more appropriate. Can I play bass?

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          Middle of the Road Guy January 26, 2017 at 8:34 am

          I wear black because Johnny Cash would.

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          • Hello, Kitty
            Hello, Kitty January 26, 2017 at 9:33 am

            He once shot a man just to watch him die.

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              q January 26, 2017 at 10:42 am

              Jonathan shot 44 people for this article.

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      John Lascurettes January 25, 2017 at 2:31 pm

      Retro-reflective tape does a LOT more for visibility in the evening than bright colors.

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    • TonyT
      TonyT January 25, 2017 at 4:51 pm

      When I drive, it’s never the color of the clothing that I notice. It’s reflectors/reflective tape and well-placed, bright lights.

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        Specialized Hardrock January 25, 2017 at 11:51 pm

        When I drive or walk, many times I’ll notice a cyclist with no lights, dark clothes, no reflectors, and it is very difficult to see him/her. Sometimes, when the light level is low, even when I know they are there they “disappear” into the background. Risky.

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      El Biciclero January 28, 2017 at 11:10 am

      “So much black/dark clothing!”

      So much broad daylight! How can anyone be expected to see anything?

      I spotted at least 11-12 motor vehicles sporting “black/dark” paint in the photo set. Drivers should really invest in some hi-viz, magnetic “body stickers” and slap them all over their cars, if they expect to be seen and have everyone scamper out of their way.

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      • Hello, Kitty
        Hello, Kitty January 28, 2017 at 11:32 am

        I’ve noticed that many dark colored cars have bright lights on them to make them more visible at night and in bad weather.

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          q January 28, 2017 at 11:43 am

          The better solution would be to look inside the cars for the underlying reasons for why they choose to be dark on the outside.

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          El Biciclero January 28, 2017 at 9:14 pm

          I do the same thing with my non-motorized vehicle; I use bright lights that are visible front, back, and sides. I even throw a reflective sash on my person at night, sometimes over my black or dark-colored sweater.

          However, these photos look like they were taken neither at night nor in bad weather. The fact that we can all clearly criticize everything from clothing choice to fender-installing skills from Jonathan’s photos indicates all the subjects were clearly visible.

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          • Hello, Kitty
            Hello, Kitty January 28, 2017 at 10:07 pm

            It probably says more about us than it does about them.

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    Jim Lee January 25, 2017 at 1:38 pm

    Great shots, as always, JM!

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    dan January 25, 2017 at 1:38 pm

    Ha! I spotted my coworker. She is wearing street clothes, but I know she is beating fools down.

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    Brian January 25, 2017 at 1:40 pm

    I think you really freaked out #10.

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      rainbike January 25, 2017 at 2:15 pm

      He got caught paying for bike fun. Think of the poor, sweet Yuba he left at home. Think of the Skuuts.

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    Bill Clinton's Ghost January 25, 2017 at 2:08 pm

    This is with little doubt my favourite recurring segment. Every Time I hope to see myself, but I’m still happy when I don’t.

    #15 is local Deaf Advocate Chris Balduc, super dude. You can see an exhibit about visually sharing music through light shows for the deaf community at the Portland Art Museum right now. It’s in the tunnel between buildings.

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    rf January 25, 2017 at 2:16 pm

    based on these picts, a ‘how to install fenders’ article might be helpful.

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    bikeninja January 25, 2017 at 2:43 pm

    Grandma, who are all those cyclists on the big mural on the side of the longhouse? Well grandson, those are the hardy folks we are all descended from. Once the gas was gone and climate change set in the weaker folk in their automobiles disappeared fast, and the pedestrians and cyclists who could brave the tough new weather were the only ones who lasted long enough to have offspring. All hail to those hardy few.

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    J_R January 25, 2017 at 2:48 pm

    I was struck by how many ride with their instep, rather than the ball of the foot, on the pedal.

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    J.Brune January 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm

    I’m so happy I finally made a “People on Bikes” segment. To me, it feels like I won the smile contest on the Ramblin Rod Show.

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      J.Brune January 25, 2017 at 4:01 pm

      20″ wheels rule!

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        Eric Leifsdad January 27, 2017 at 12:01 am

        Is that a non-folding dahon?

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      El Biciclero January 28, 2017 at 11:58 pm

      Ramblin’ Rod rules! Wow. I was on that show back in…never mind.

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    Craig Collins January 25, 2017 at 4:40 pm

    Not a single brake-less fixed gear!

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      Bill Clinton's Ghost January 25, 2017 at 4:58 pm

      Seems like the most iconic part of the portland bike scene is versatile jackets.

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    Velo Lady January 25, 2017 at 6:53 pm

    Hey! I’m on here!! πŸ˜€ NEAT!

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    mh January 25, 2017 at 7:34 pm

    No one using Bar Mitts (pogies). Mystifying.

    I put them on both bikes when the rain really starts, and don’t take them off until fingerless gloves season.

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    J.Brune January 25, 2017 at 7:37 pm

    Number 12 does. Love them during the winter.

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      mh January 25, 2017 at 7:55 pm

      Whoops. Thanks for the reality/vision check.

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    B. Carfree January 25, 2017 at 9:12 pm

    Lots of folks carrying their gear on their backs. I guess that’s fine for short distances, which is kind of a norm these days.

    And just for Kyle Bannerjee, look at all those rear bags that have such poor aerodynamics. My short in-town riding also involves bags on my body and stuff in huge rear baskets. Just to complete the unsporty look, I ride an old step-through Schwinn one-speed. (Actually, I have two speeds: slow and stopped.)

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      Brian January 26, 2017 at 10:06 am

      I have a longass commute and went back to a backpack. I like to stand when I’m climbing and prefer the weight on my back rather than on the wheel.

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      Kyle Banerjee January 26, 2017 at 12:50 pm

      I’m with Brian — I prefer the weight on the rear rather than the front for handling purposes.

      What works for different people is all about objectives. How far you need to go, terrain, traffic, weather, hauling needs, etc.

      My commute is strictly utilitarian and slow putzing around would be a deal buster for me. If there’s not enough efficiency, fun, or exercise involved, I’d go another way.

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    Daniel January 25, 2017 at 9:14 pm

    I used to work with the guy in #18.
    If I was wearing half as much as these people I’d be sweaty. How do they not melt wearing some of those jackets? No one was wearing lycra in these pics, interesting. You always get the Lance Armstrong wannabes trying to get a training ride in on their way home.

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      pengo January 26, 2017 at 1:11 pm

      While I’ve found lycra to be a great defense against overheating I’ve always fancied myself more of an Ivan Stevic wannabe.

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    Specialized Hardrock January 26, 2017 at 12:20 am

    What you wear when commuting depends on how far/fast you ride, how much you sweat, whether you can shower at work, the weather, etc. Looks like many different scenarios represented in photos above.

    Safety gear missing:

    gloves – 3 people (one on the Nike bike may have been an out of towner?)
    helmet – 5 people (ditto)
    eye glasses or goggles – 32 people (a bug or piece of gravel in the eye is gonna ouch)
    bright colors – about 22 people, although many of those did have lights, both is best

    If they were only traveling a few blocks, probably not huge risks, but our goal is 0.

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      B. Carfree January 26, 2017 at 10:30 am

      If JM took 44 photos of motorists, here’s what he would find:

      Safety gear missing:

      None of the people in motor vehicles would be wearing proper helmets
      None of the people in cars would be wearing eye protection
      None of the people in cars (unless in a child seat) in 5-point harnesses
      Very few of the cars in bright colors
      Many (usually 5-20%) of the cars with defective lights/operation

      Overall, I’d say the people on bikes are showing a far greater use of safety equipment.

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        Specialized Hardrock January 26, 2017 at 12:55 pm

        B. Carfree:
        Maybe you didn’t notice, but:
        Head and eye protection is built into the design of cars. Cars have air bags and seat belts. Cars are fairly visible because of their size so color and lights are not as critical as on a bike. Also, due to the protection afforded by the many safety features, the occupants are fairly well protected.

        Keep trying, B. Carfree – eventually you’ll get one right – even a stopped clock is right twice per day.

        πŸ˜‰

        None of the people in motor vehicles would be wearing proper helmets
        None of the people in cars would be wearing eye protection
        None of the people in cars (unless in a child seat) in 5-point harnesses
        Very few of the cars in bright colors
        Many (usually 5-20%) of the cars with defective lights/operation

        Overall, I’d say the people on bikes are showing a far greater use of safety equipment.

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          Dan A January 26, 2017 at 1:11 pm

          “A new report conducted by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and State Farm Insurance found that of the more then 55,000 teenage drivers and their passengers who were seriously injured in auto accidents during 2009 and 2010, 30 percent suffered acute head injuries, including concussions, skull fractures and traumatic brain injuries (TBI). While there’s been a welcome decline in fatalities at the hands of teen drivers over the past six years, according to the Centers for Disease Control car crashes remain the leading cause of TBI-related death among 15- to 19-year-olds.”

          http://www.forbes.com/sites/jimgorzelany/2012/04/02/forget-football-car-crashes-are-the-leading-cause-of-fatal-head-trauma-among-teens/#1f8c987c2cec

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      Allan Rudwick January 26, 2017 at 11:13 am

      Not everyone sees every fun ride as a chance to die. I prefer to see the enjoyment in life, not the fear.

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      q January 26, 2017 at 11:15 am

      I’d say the goal should be to not need all that safety gear.

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        Specialized Hardrock January 26, 2017 at 12:56 pm

        Please let us know the very minute that goal has been achieved.

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          q January 26, 2017 at 1:22 pm

          What’s your point with saying that?

          Also, why are you speaking for everyone with your “OUR goal is 0″ in regard to wearing helmets, gloves, eye protection, and bright colors?” I’ve never, ever heard a single person before you having every cyclist wearing eye protection and gloves as a goal. If it’s your own goal, fine–say that. Or if you think it SHOULD be “our” goal, say that. But don’t say “our goal” for a goal that includes something so inane as having every cyclist wear eye protection and gloves.

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      Alex Reedin January 26, 2017 at 1:21 pm

      The consensus on this topic in health research is that biking has a large net health & safety benefit (health benefits from exercise is much greater than health costs from crashes). The net benefit is so great that my estimation is that the effect of safety gear is relatively insignificant (i.e. someone wearing no safety gear gets a large net benefit; someone wearing all the safety gear gets a slightly larger net benefit).

      That is why I don’t wear any of the things you mentioned. I’m already coming out WAY ahead by biking rather than driving or taking the train. I personally decline to go from WAY ahead to slightly further WAY ahead at the cost of some personal comfort and convenience.

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        Alex Reedin January 26, 2017 at 1:28 pm

        (Note: I do use lights, copiously, as I guess that bike-mounted lights are, happily, both the most effective and least inconvenient safety method).

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    Kittens January 26, 2017 at 3:30 am

    always an entertaining post!

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    ChadwickF January 26, 2017 at 8:07 am

    Thanks for doing another one of these, I always look to see if there are things/ways to ride I might not have otherwise considered. Cheers!

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  • Mike G
    Mike G January 26, 2017 at 8:42 am

    I think I would look pretty different in winter vs summer. different bikes, fenders, lighting, gloves, balaclava, glasses, shoes, layers…but at all times, a helmet mirror.

    Scare the hell out of me to ride without one. I even miss it when I am walking.

    Great post.

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    Greg Spencer January 26, 2017 at 10:39 am

    Couple observations: There are about twice as many men than women. Am I the first to remark on this?

    About 90 percent wear helmets (I’ve done my own scans on Portland streets, and always come up with a similar figure).

    I moved to Portland last summer from Budapest, Hungary. What I notice (in John’s pix and in in day-to-day riding) is that Portlanders tend to wear sportier clothing and ride sportier bikes. I chalk this up partly to Portland being quite spread out and average commute distances long — you work up a sweat. The other thing is that Portland is an outdoorsy, sporty kind of place, and a lot of riders are into cycling for fitness or competition reasons — even if also for transport reasons.

    There’s also much more helmet use and high-vis clothing. This may also be due to many riders coming to cycling for sport/fitness reasons — and perhaps because of the spotty public lighting. I’d be curious what long-timers think.

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      Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) January 26, 2017 at 11:31 am

      Hi Greg,

      Nice to hear you lived in Budapest. I love it there! My wife was born there and still has family there. We had an awesome visit last summer.

      I think you’re right on with your observations about the differences between portland and budapest. The US is obsessed with performance/sports and it pervades many of the things we do… include cycling for transportation. And yes, distances people cover here are far more than in Budapest — because we are much less dense in terms of housing and land use.

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        Greg Spencer January 26, 2017 at 11:44 am

        Your wife’s from Bp?? I’d enjoy chatting about that sometime … Next time you plan a trip to Budapest, I’ll hook you up with some people in the cycling community there. Fun people doing important stuff.

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      Andy K January 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm

      Yes I noticed this too.

      Bike counts show my area, through Washington Park and over the west hills, between 86%-92% men. During the offseason, between October and May, and especially during the darker months when they don’t do counts, it feels more like 98%-99%. I can’t explain it.

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    Allan Rudwick January 26, 2017 at 11:14 am

    I wonder what this would look like from 5:45 to 6:15. I feel like that is the real rush on this corridor. (Jonathan I’m not trying to make you late to see your kids, just a comment)

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    Carrie January 26, 2017 at 12:20 pm

    Oh My Gosh you people. Who cares if they’re wearing gloves or helmets or glasses or have weirdly installed fenders or don’t ride on the balls of their feet. LOOK AT ALL THESE PEOPLE RIDING BIKES HOME instead of driving a gas-powered personal vehicle! How cool is that?!?! Aren’t you glad to be part of that tribe?

    (OK, I’m bummed not a single kid riding their own bike. But it is significantly after school has already gotten out.)

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      pengo January 26, 2017 at 12:54 pm

      I for one ride bicycles in the winter one way (the right way) and am literally incapable of understanding why other people have different preferences.

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        Lester Burnham January 26, 2017 at 1:19 pm

        Its sounds like some people here think you should only be in full racing kit riding 700×23 tires pumped up to 120 psi. Only then can you be a real bike commuter.

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          pengo January 26, 2017 at 2:28 pm

          Those people are fools. You should only be in full racing kit riding 700×23 tires pumped up to 90 psi.

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            Alex Reedin January 26, 2017 at 3:09 pm

            How could you say such a thing! 60-pound dutch bikes and tophats should be mandatory for all bicycle riding. Folks from the West Hills could especially stand to slow down and take note of the present moment, and trudging up the hill(s) pushing their 60-pound monstrosities certainly helps you slow down. It’s mindfulness and whole-body exercise at the same time!

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            • Adam
              Adam January 26, 2017 at 3:15 pm

              Highly recommend 60-pound Dutch bikes, though they do make quite a bit of the city inaccessible. I typically only ride mine if I have stuff to carry under 5 miles over flatish terrain, otherwise I’m on the Disc Trucker.

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                Alex Reedin January 26, 2017 at 6:17 pm

                I rode mine as my only bike for many happy years. Ah, the halcyon kid-less days of yore in inner Southeast!

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              pengo January 27, 2017 at 9:53 am

              Nonsense. West hills residents commute exclusively via helicopter. Everyone knows this.

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                q January 27, 2017 at 10:29 am

                Duh. Who else do you think the teachers at schools there are referring to when they complain about all the “helicopter parents”?

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        Kyle Banerjee January 26, 2017 at 2:33 pm

        Not sure why anyone would pump them up that high unless they are particularly heavy.

        It’s like driving a car — best air pressure and max pressure the tire can handle are not at all the same thing.

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    anna January 26, 2017 at 12:23 pm

    love seeing the douze in there. hi harper family.

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    Andy K January 26, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    When are you doing “People in Cars”?

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      Kyle Banerjee January 26, 2017 at 2:35 pm

      You’d have to wait too long for 44 cars to pass and everyone would look grouchy. That area is consistently gummed up at rush hour.

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      Chris I January 26, 2017 at 3:32 pm

      That’s on DrivePortland.org

      You should see their comments section…

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    Alex Reedin January 26, 2017 at 1:24 pm

    I dig the guys on obvious kid carriers (41, 42) – represent! Nice style too – especially 41’s nice grey coat and patterned scarf.

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    Kyra January 28, 2017 at 7:36 pm

    My friend just pointed out to me that my photo is here (#1) on bike Portland. Fun! I was really happy at the time this photo was taken because I had just had a much needed massage. It was cold that day! I was riding slow with a few extra layers, and staying cozy and relaxed. Keep riding, Portland!

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