Opinion: Using our strength in an uncertain time

Posted by on November 18th, 2016 at 3:19 pm

Sunset on Broadway Bridge-1

10 days after the election, as Trump and his cast of characters take the reins of power in Washington, I’m still having a hard time focusing on cycling news and policy. As I’m sure some of you are too.

I oscillate between thinking I should work even harder here on BikePortland and thinking I should add my voice and energy to other groups who need help resisting what look like ominous times ahead. Then there’s the stress, frustration and disappointment that make it hard to focus on anything at all.

But don’t get me wrong. I’m not looking for sympathy. In fact, I’ve come to the realization that I’m lucky.

If you have the privilege of being unafraid, you have the responsiblity to do fearless work.

I’m a white, cis, middle-class male. I have relatively very little to fear compared to people without all my privileges. That thought led me to share something on Twitter the other day that seems to have struck a chord with a lot of people (one woman even created a work of art from it!): If you have the privilege of being unafraid, you have the responsiblity to do fearless work.

I’ve been trying to live up to my own words and translate them into the type of work that I know best: community journalism and transportation activism.

When it comes to bike advocacy, I can’t help but see parallels to what’s going on nationally. The people in our community that bike advocates (in general) have been criticized for not listening to and welcoming into the tent — people of color, people with lower incomes, women — are the ones likely to be hurt the most by the Trump administration’s actions and policies. In fact, it’s already happening. There’s also the idea that an echo-chamber from the urban-oriented establishment media and power class failed to connect to people beyond the city limits. That criticism of the Democratic party reminds me of the equity debate in transportation circles where the central city and its activists dominate most policy and project conversations and those beyond 82nd Avenue struggle to have their voices heard.

We need to use our (relative) strength in a way that lifts other people up so they can battle what lies ahead — whether that means the strength of our relationships and existing activism infrastructure and/or the power of cycling itself.

In addition to individuals, we also need to be aware how this election impacts agencies and institutions. And then be ready to support them when needed.

The other day I heard from a Portland Bureau of Transportation staffer who expressed anxiety about how the election will impact their work. Let’s be clear: Cycling is a minority road user group in America and the places and politicians that support it are generally on the left of the political spectrum. As much as we like to think cycling is bipartisan (and it is, to some extent), with the strong shift to the right on Capitol Hill and in the White House, a different transportation worldview will trickle down to state departments of transportation — one where funding for bike-friendly infrastructure and policies that support non-motorized transportation will get knocked down several notches.

The PBOT staffer I talked with the other day is already worried their momentum will be significantly slowed down in the coming years. With our state DOT already a massive impediment to sensible transportation reform, “PBOT needs the community’s support now more than ever,” they said.

Cycling makes places and people stronger and Portland has a dedicated community that cares about it deeply.

How can we best use our relative strength and our passion for cycling to help the broader community stay resilient to the potential changes ahead? I would love to hear your thoughts.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are productive, considerate, and welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

227 Comments
  • Avatar
    dwk November 18, 2016 at 3:42 pm

    Before the election, the few times Trumps name was brought up, the posts were deleted.
    Since you have voiced concerns about him ever since the election, you might have spoke up before since you had a platform.

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      Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 18, 2016 at 4:42 pm

      Hi dwk,

      I never deleted a comment solely because it mentioned Trump. And you’re right, I could have written more about him before the election. However you’ll notice I didn’t post anything about Clinton either. I think people have lots of other places to get national political news so I’ve chosen to not make that the focus of Bikeportland.

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        dwk November 19, 2016 at 9:04 am

        “I think people have lots of other places to get national political news so I’ve chosen to not make that the focus of Bikeportland.”

        And yet you have allowed “I voted for Trump” to post continual national political comments.

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          Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 19, 2016 at 9:10 am

          dwk,

          I don’t understand your comment. Yes I’ve allowed someone with Trump in their username to comment here. I don’t see how that relates at all to the editorial content or focus of BikePortland.

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            dwk November 19, 2016 at 9:22 am

            His comments are entirely political. It is the only reason he is logged on.

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    Patrick November 18, 2016 at 4:27 pm

    The work you are doing here on this blog is good work and very valuable.

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      Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 18, 2016 at 5:27 pm

      Thank you Patrick! That’s nice to hear. I want to keep doing it! I just need to make the business side of things work a little better.

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        Kittens November 18, 2016 at 11:29 pm

        In the days immediately following the election, the only news sites I could stand reading were BikePortland and the celebrity section of Huffington Post! I’m slowly branching out.

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    Eric Leifsdad November 18, 2016 at 4:32 pm

    We don’t need to “fund bike infrastructure”. Just take our infrastructure back from car users, who aren’t paying for it anyway. We should work on getting reps and transportation planners into this mindset.

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 12:41 pm

      Taking it “back” is harder if we never had it in the first place.

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      longgone November 19, 2016 at 1:39 pm

      With all due respect Eric, your idea is delusional.

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        Eric Leifsdad November 19, 2016 at 7:53 pm

        The delusion is that we’re going to continue allowing drivers to use and abuse our transportation system without paying for the wear on the pavement and impact on the safety and comfort of everyone around them. Close a road to through traffic and suddenly the maintenance costs aren’t a problem. Funny how that works.

        And, who pays for free parking? If we’re going to socialize automobility, we should go all the way and give everyone the same number of horsepower per cupholder. Either that, or pay your own way in full. What we have now in-between these two extremes, somebody is getting something for nothing because someone else is getting nothing for their something.

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          B. Carfree November 20, 2016 at 8:53 am

          I was thinking about this as I recently spent some time in my old hometown Davis, CA. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, the pavement was absolutely perfect. In the ’90s the pavement was so-so. By the naughties, the streets were falling apart; they are now almost as bad as those in a typical Oregon city.

          What else happened during this time? Streets that formerly saw almost no cars (bikes outnumbered cars by a large margin during the peak years in the ’70’s and ’80’s) were suddenly full of cars. Even the parking lanes that were previously empty were stacked with stored cars. Of course the average weight of the cars went up substantially as people got fatter and sales of SUVs boomed. Also, people were driving a lot faster, which no doubt accelerated the loss of people on bikes as well as increasing the road damage.

          Davis now has a backlog of street repair of over $100 Million with no means of catching up. That’s over $1200 for every person in the city. Work is focused on arterials that have been taken over by motorists while the side streets that people on bikes have been shoved over to are slowly becoming akin to gravel. Motorists’ subsidized ride is ruining everyone else’s rides.

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            David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 4:25 pm

            Actually, cars and SUVs have gotten much lighter over the decades, thanks to replacing the outer metal shell with plastic, among other changes.

            In most cities, the decline in pavement quality is only partly due to wear and tear, but mostly due to deferred maintenance and the significant loss of tax revenue used for street repairs and rebuilds. In Davis, it probably started with Proposition 13, when property taxes were massively reduced in the 80s in CA; In Portland it began with the massive property tax rollback in 1991/2, when tax rates went from 3% to 1% overnight, and the city redirected street maintenance funds towards police and fire. Here in NC and elsewhere, street maintenance dropped further off during the long recession of 2008-12.

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          longgone November 21, 2016 at 7:17 am

          Do you pay to use a bike staple? I’ll reply more later, when I have time

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            BB November 21, 2016 at 10:46 am

            We all pay for the bike staple – in the form of paying taxes. Where your analogy falls apart is the fact that with repeated use the staple doesn’t eventually degrade to the point where it needs replacing or major repair annually, unlike roads being continually damaged by automotive traffic.

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    bikeninja November 18, 2016 at 4:42 pm

    This election represents the last gasp of a dying system. The energy intensive, extraction driven, pollution spewing version of late stage capitalism is in its death throws, and this election was its last hurrah. No matter what else happens in the country we have to set the example here of how we will live in the future. How we can get around without cars, how we can grow our food close to home without chemicals and how we can all get along regardless of our race, gender or religion. When this last experiment with madness is over, the rest of America will need a roadmap for the future.

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      David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 4:35 pm

      Free-market capitalism has been around since at least the 1600s, long before Adam Smith theorized about it in the 1700s. Capital-accumulation capitalism has been around even longer. Cars have been around since the mid-1800s, almost as long as bikes, and in large numbers since 1913. Given we used horses in large numbers until the 1920s, I’d say we’ll both be long dead of natural causes before Americans stop using personal cars in significant numbers.

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    Kittens November 18, 2016 at 5:13 pm

    Before we all hold hands and sing kumbaya, let us all remember how we got here…

    18 years ago, the R’s impeached Bill for lying about having consensual sex out of wedlock.

    16 years ago the US supreme court stopped a recount in FL which had the result of foisting W on us despite loosing the popular vote.

    13 years ago W’s administration lied to the world and bullied us into a war which continues to this day and wasted $1.7 T.

    8 years ago Mitch Mcconnell met in secret with top republican lawmakers and decided the #1 priority would be making Obama a one term president. This, after a modern-day election landslide.

    This is war, people! And it has been nothing else, at least since the Gingrich years. They want to destroy the America which does not look/think like them. The list of horrible things they would do would be laughable if not for the fact that (after they appoint someone to the supreme court) they now control all branches of government.

    This is not a time for moderation and hands across America. Obama wasted most of his presidency trying that. You do not negotiate with domestic terrorists. Like Johnathan said, most of us are “privileged” to not be subject to deportation, loosing our healthcare, having our vote throttled, or being listed and tracked due to our religion.

    We won the popular vote and won the cities and states which are the economic powerhouses of America. The fact that our system disproportionally favors rural America at the state and federal level is a vestige of the country we once were.

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      Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 18, 2016 at 5:29 pm

      I agree with you Kittens.

      Part of being fearless IMO is not being afraid to rock the boat. I think the left tries to find refuge in the system and the right (to generalize) has found more success by blowing up the system. If people on the left want to compete, the big question is… Do you continue to do it through the system or do you take a page out of the Republican’s book and stop playing by the rules?

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        kittens November 18, 2016 at 11:23 pm

        I’m not saying we need to run around smashing Toyota Camrys, but I do think the anger should be encouraged, propagated and productively channeled by sympathetic leadership lest it simply fade. Look at Occupy; an organic movement which had no logical conclusion or objective and resulted in just about nothing changing.

        The only reason progressive democrats consistently loose is by always backing down and becoming apathetic. We have nothing to show for all our hard work, passion and dreams. Obama embodied this sprit and inspired a generation and then proved how entrenched the forces out to get him were.

        Battle/war/whatever is as much symbolic as it is objective. We need a win and we need it now or people indeed might give up working through our systems. Mayor Hales and the PPD have shown how well they can tamp down a movement by stoking fear. Shameful. There were probably less than a dozen young boys who caused that property damage. The cities, including Portland, should rise in unison to demand better from our leaders and each other.

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        soren November 19, 2016 at 3:23 pm

        the left?
        what left?

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 18, 2016 at 5:36 pm

      >>> This is war, people! And it has been nothing else, at least since the xxxx years. They want to destroy the America which does not look/think like them. The list of horrible things they would do would be laughable if not for… <<<

      It's probably worth noting that this would be the exact same rhetoric we'd be hearing from the other side had Hillary won.

      Our country is deeply divided (though we have been moreso in the past), and we need to find areas of common cause to try to narrow that rift a little, and keep the extremists at bay.

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        Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 18, 2016 at 6:06 pm

        hello, kitty… I hear you but the people in power in washington right now have ZERO interest in finding common cause. So, do you wait for them with your hand extended? Or do you find other methods to counter their power? This is not business as usual, so it requires a completely new approach IMO. How do you counter extremism with moderate, honorable methods? You can’t. You will get rolled. This situation requires a new approach. Not sure what it is, but it certainly isn’t extend olive branches that will just get snapped.

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 18, 2016 at 6:41 pm

          I mostly agree with the statement part of what you just wrote. It is still early days, and I think there is still a shakeout coming between Trump and the establishment Republican party, and a way forward may become clearer after that. Maybe it will be full press to counter everything Trump does (the Republican strategy during the Obama years), but that’s a strategy that’s difficult without either body of congress; or it might be to find factions within the Republican party where Democrats can work, either with or against Trump. Remember that Trump was not exactly embraced by mainstream Republicans (even if they voted for him in the end), and they may still try to wrest control of the party back from him.

          Don’t get me wrong, I see the grave danger ahead. I just think it’s too early to know what the winning strategy will be, or if there will even be one.

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            Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 18, 2016 at 6:54 pm

            I hear you Hello, Kitty… but that’s the conundrum right now… do we have time to wait and see “how things shake out”?

            The Rs have proven they’s do absolutely anything to gain power…. now they’ll do anything to maintain it. I see 2 possible paths to that end… they will either choose moderation because they fear the political backlash coming in 2018 midterms and in 2020 – or they will take the other, darker and more unprecedented path, and create an apparatus of power and corruption and intimidation that ensconces their power by any means necessary. Can we afford to wait and see?

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              Pdxpaul November 18, 2016 at 7:43 pm

              They declared war on reason a long time ago. This nonsense has gone far enough and we need to monkey wrench everything with as much effort as we have. Because they are not interested in compromise.

              We are in the midst of an ideological war, and the sooner we treat it as such, the sooner we can make meaningful progress.

              I’m with you Jonathan.

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            • Hello, Kitty
              Hello, Kitty November 18, 2016 at 10:44 pm

              I don’t know that we have much choice — there’s not much that we can do at the moment anyway. All I’m saying is that it’s too early to tell how things will shake out, and there are plausible scenarios where things turn out better than they may appear at the moment.

              We need be ready and willing to reach across the divide if and when it is to our advantage. And I think there will come a time when it will be.

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              Kevin November 18, 2016 at 11:33 pm

              Big generalizations to follow: Liberals and the left in general tend to be thoughtful and analytical people who value inclusiveness. We want everything to work out, and we want collaboration and a team effort to get it done. When it doesn’t get done, there is much hand wringing and liberal guilt about what we could have been done better.

              This needs to stop. We need to work across the isle when possible, but we must stand strong on our convictions. We must fight for what we believe in and for the world we want. This is the way forward, indeed, it has shown itself to be the only way forward.

              We must meet them in the streets and in our businesses; in the non-profits arena and in the halls of government. We must fight for what we want wherever we want it. We must not capitulate, and we must not normalize these un-normal times.

              The writing is on the wall. If we don’t stand to stop this, then who will.

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              Kevin November 18, 2016 at 11:43 pm

              We make the contribution and work toward the outcome that speaks to us. Advocating for safer streets and better transportation options makes real and substantive impact to our community. These concepts are at the center of livibity, safety, the economy, our environment, and equity and social justice. This is good, noble work.

              Change happens from the bottom-up, and many hands makes light work — we must all do our part and fight for the world we want to see.

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              I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 1:09 am

              Jonathan said: “The Rs have proven they’s do absolutely anything to gain power…. now they’ll do anything to maintain it.”

              That statement is such crap that it is laughable. The R’s just won many elections across the nation, with a win here and there for the Ds. The Rs did it fair and square by getting more votes, unlike Clinton vs Bernie. The reason the Rs won more is because the ideas of the left are extreme – sorry but making women shower with men is not a good way to win an election!!!

              I would suggest that you start being honest. Start by being honest with yourself. Going around making false, hateful comments about people who do not have the same political views as you is only going to make them think you are some kind of kook (or worse).

              Also, when someone says I don’t like Obamacare or some other Obama policy, ask them why, don’t go off and immediately call them “racist” – which is what liberals do 90% of the time. Apparently liberals cannot debate policy and must resort to name calling, lying about the other guy, etc. Engage in conversation and LISTEN once in a while. Try to sort out what is good about what the other guy is saying. The left does not have a monopoly on good ideas.

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                dwk November 19, 2016 at 7:16 am

                ***comment deleted – I share your frustrations and anger about the election dwk, but nothing good will come out of yelling and screaming and being mean to others in comments on a blog. Please feel free to strongly disagree with others, but make your points without resorting to name-calling and hatred. Or at least do it with more tact. Thanks. — Jonathan.***

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                dwk November 19, 2016 at 7:23 am

                My first reply is in moderation and probably won’t get published.
                I will try again.
                Trump is not a “normal” candidate or person and people like yourselves show why. You are only logged into this site to promote Trump for some reason. Are you being paid?
                With the help of a complicent media and the FBI we had a right wing coup in this country and you are doing your part.
                This is the beginning of the break up of the this country, no doubt.
                I for one, have no interest in living in the same country as your ilk…..

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                dwk November 19, 2016 at 7:30 am

                “Our wonderful future V.P. Mike Pence was harassed last night at the theater by the cast of Hamilton, cameras blazing.This should not happen!”

                Our new “presidents” response to threatre goers last night who booed Pense in NYC. Get use this Trump guy, ***portion of comment deleted — please no insults or name-calling. Thanks – Jonathan***.

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                Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 19, 2016 at 9:24 am

                Hi I voted for Trump!,

                Please don’t refer to mine or anyone else’s comments as being “crap”. We are trying to have real and productive discussions here and if you want to continue to have your comments published, you need to be more respectful of others.

                As for your reply to my comment. I stongly disagree with you.

                IMO the Republicans have promoted a number of falsehoods and aided the spread of lies and conspiracy theories about Obama and Clinton for years. Those lies have influenced people’s votes. Republicans have also worked hard to supress votes of people who tend to vote Democrat. Trump clearly tried to intimidate people from showing up to the polls and he and his advisors were in close touch with Russia and were aided by both Russia and the FBI in the run-up to the election. These are facts. Let’s be honest about what is going on here. We appear to both have a different idea of what it means to be honest.

                And beyond the facts… I’d love to know how you feel about the spike in hate crimes that have risen as Trump’s profile has risen.

                Please point out the “false” and “hateful” comments I have made. And I don’t recall ever calling someone a “racist”.

                Not all “liberals” are the same… Just as I don’t assume all “conservatives” or republicans are the same. Let’s look beyond labels and try to see each other as humans with different perspectives.

                Thanks.

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                I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 3:53 pm

                JM,

                There is no evidence that Trump had help from the Russians in this election. It’s possible they did, but there is no evidence. If you have evidence (not hearsay), provide a link.

                The Rs have not tried to suppress anyone from voting – requiring an ID to prove who you are when you vote is not voter suppression – there is no legitimate argument against it – although the left falsely says there is.

                Yes, referring to your comment as “crap” isn’t the most diplomatic way to do things, but it is true that there is no truth in your comment that the Rs will “do anything” to gain and keep power. The statement is false – there, that’s better. The Ds lost elections in governor races, state houses, etc all over the country and have been doing so for several years now. That’s because many of their ideas are extreme, and people see the result of D control of all major cities and it isnt’ pretty.

                There is no such thing as a “hate” crime. It is against the law to harm others no matter who they are, and perps should be punsihed. That being said, the fact is there has been no increase in reported hate crimes. To paraphrase from link below, in 2014 there were 5479 hate crimes reported to the FBI, and in 2015 there were 5850. The link says that is “far lower” than in the early 2000s. In my view the difference of less than 400 is not significant out of a population of ~ 350,000,000. I would recommend that people stop spreading false rumors about this because it scares minorities and contributes to greater racial division – all over nothing.
                https://lasvegassun.com/news/2016/nov/14/fbi-hate-crimes-against-muslims-up-by-67-percent-i/

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                David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 4:56 pm

                FYI, folks, Trump is no more a Republican than Bernie was a Democrat. We don’t really know what Trump supports or opposes. As Garry Trudeau has often pointed out in Doonesbury, Trump has both supported and opposed every cause and issue you can name in the last five years. Voters did not elect the Tea Party or some of the known far-right political candidates like Cruz or Jeb Bush who have served in office before, they elected a hotel developer from NYC who has never held office before. And they voted for him specifically because he has never held office before. He’s totally unknown on his policies, and totally unpredictable.

                Before you panic, I suggest you re-read your constitution – not the amendments, but the core articles. You’ll find his powers to do right or harm are severely limited, which partly explains why his predecessor wasn’t able to do much in the past 8 years.

                I applaud anyone who acts to create good social change through the powers of peaceful advocacy, protest, politicking, media, and budgeting. I have a bit less tolerance for conspiracy theories, pointless protests, rioting, and finger-pointing. I agree, listen, try, and learn.

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              • Hello, Kitty
                Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 10:11 am

                When someone says I don’t like Obamacare, I ask them what their alternative proposal is. Republicans have offered no coherent alternative, and never have. I don’t particularly like Obamacare myself, but if there was a workable alternative, Republicans would have offered it by now, and used their power over the past 8 years to reshape Obamacare into something they liked better.

                Well, now it’s time to put up or shut up.

                Also, I’m interested in learning more about which political party is in favor of making women shower with men. It’s an intriguing idea, and I’d like to sign up for their newsletter.

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                I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:11 pm

                They voted many times to repeal the ACA, but either they did not have the votes or else the vote was overturned (can’t remember which it was). I do not like the individual mandate. That is one reason for the skyrocketing premium increases – if your customers are forced to buy your product you can raise the price to anything you want and they have to pay it or get fined by the government. That alone is reason to repeal the ACA.

                If you can’t afford healthcare premiums you can get subsidies under the ACA (must have less than a certain amount of income). That is called welfare. Many people can’t pay the premiums but do not want to take subsidies (welfare) and would prefer to not have insurance, so the IRS then fines them for not collecting welfare so they can buy insurance. It’s immoral to do this to people.

                There are lots of ways to improve health care. Trump has some proposals on his website. Here’s the main health care page and there’s a link at the top to a 4 page pdf with more detail:
                https://www.donaldjtrump.com/policies/health-care/
                I didn’t pay a lot of attention to his plan but he does have one, however congress will have to approve any changes to healthcare regulations. He has said he would like to keep parts of the ACA such as coverage for preexisting conditions. I’d like to see:
                > ability to purchase from any plan in the USA
                > not requiring peopl to pay for maternity coverage
                > no individual mandate of any kind
                > no “enrollment period” – enroll when you want
                > medical providers to list cost of all procedures on the internet
                > can’t refuse to cover pre-existing conditions for more than 30 days if you have previously not had coverage
                > allowing truly catastrophic coverage to lower premiums
                > reduced rates for healthy people
                > etc……

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                B. Carfree November 19, 2016 at 10:27 am

                Actually, HRC got more votes that Bernie. She also got more votes than DJT. They are still counting, but at last report she had over 1.6 million more votes, about 1.3%, and rising.

                About Obama-Care, when I have engaged those who dislike it, they universally know nothing about it and have never used the exchanges. The facts support it as a wildly successful program that has dramatically reduced the prior increases in the cost of coverage, covered millions of previously uninsured (we now have the lowest rate of uninsured Americans in history) and, most importantly, dramatically increased the quality of insurance policies. Prior to the ACA, my policy was three times as costly and was basically a one-use thing, since any use would lead to non-renewal and I would be blacklisted from any future policy based on “pre-existing conditions”.

                With that in mind, how can opposition to the ACA be rooted in much other than racism and/or ignorance?

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                wsbob November 19, 2016 at 2:06 pm

                The ACA…obamacare…is complicated, difficult to understand. I struggle to grasp how it works, and I think many people struggle similarly. Slowly, I’m coming to understand more about it. Couple nights ago on tavis smiley…talk show guy on pbs…somebody by the name of Robert K Ross was on, talking about the ACA and what trump might do with it. He seemed to have a good sense of what the plan can do, what’s good and bad about it.

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                I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:14 pm

                Here’s how:
                http://bikeportland.org/2016/11/18/opinion-using-our-strength-in-an-uncertain-time-195680#comment-6732013

                No person anywhere opposed ACA due to race.

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        Stephen Keller November 18, 2016 at 6:07 pm

        I believe you are correct. As someone who support neither side and thinks both are fundamentally flawed, I think the choice we face boils down to this: we can continue to fight among ourselves and destroy the country or we learn to work together and build something for our children to enjoy.

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          Eric Leifsdad November 19, 2016 at 1:06 am

          I agree the “us vs them” has to stop. But cooperating with fascists is not the way forward. Handing control to democrats might be a wise reaction, but it’s hard to feel like you’re not being manipulated at that point: “You can either give us your money or this scary man will eat you.” (“and take your money”)

          Both sides are playing “defeat the evil other” rather than nominating the best leaders. We need national vote by mail, eliminate the electoral college, and multi-mark ballots in the presidential election. http://www.rcvmaine.com/

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        Doug November 21, 2016 at 4:29 am

        Cover pre-existing conditions and it’s no longer insurance. Can you imagine buying fire insurance that covered pre-existing conditions? You could buy the policy while your house is a blaze.

        I wouldn’t go to a doctor if my life depended on it. Keep your leaches.

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          Susan Y Kubota November 21, 2016 at 10:26 am

          Doug,
          I respect your opinion. So in case of emergency, when you are unable to speak for yourself, please have a note in your wallet or have this tattooed to your chest: “DO NOT TAKE ME TO THE ER, LEAVE ME AS YOU FOUND ME” I wouldn’t want you to go thru undesired “Doctor’s” care and I’m sure others along with me, would appreciate not wasting our tax dollars that pay for the EMT’s and paramedics and ambulance and emergency room/trauma OR/trauma ICU/rehab expenses frequently required in situations involving an unresponsive person with life-threatening injuries.

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      B. Carfree November 18, 2016 at 5:58 pm

      One little item missing from your list that seems worthy of mention is the role that FBI director Comey played in this election. Ten days prior to election day, he released a letter strongly suggesting there was a new “scandal” with emails and HRC. Of course there was no such thing, but his letter clearly swayed millions of previously undecided voters and likely swung the election.

      That’s KGB-style work there. Never before have we seen US law enforcement abuse their position to illegally interfere with a US election. This may well have been the most troubling thing of the entire election fiasco. GOP minions have now infiltrated our most essential government functions and will apparently abuse any trust to assure their “team” wins.

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        Hello, Kitty November 18, 2016 at 6:45 pm

        I agree that Comey’s actions were a disgrace, but I don’t blame him for HRC’s loss. I doubt he changed many minds.

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          rachel b November 18, 2016 at 11:30 pm

          He certainly abruptly killed their momentum.

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            Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 10:14 am

            I don’t think they had the momentum they thought they had. Ordinarily, I’d be calling for Comey to be fired, but now I’m more nervous about who he’d be replaced with.

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              rachel b November 19, 2016 at 12:23 pm

              Good point. !

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            MIke Sanders November 19, 2016 at 8:04 pm

            Hilary said the same thing. The power of the FBI’s director was used for blatantly political purpises. It did kill her momentum. That office isn’t supposed to be used that way. But it was, setting an awful precedent.

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              David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:00 pm

              Gee, who appointed him? Couldn’t be a democrat, right? Must be a republican conspiracy.

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                rachel b November 20, 2016 at 9:08 pm

                A Democrat concerned with the appearance of fairness, making a bid to “reach across the aisle.” Democrats (and I am one) are schmucks. Republicans are ruthless.

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        wsbob November 18, 2016 at 11:41 pm

        “…Ten days prior to election day, he released a letter strongly suggesting there was a new “scandal” with emails and HRC. …” carfree

        I never read the letter, but it seemed to me that what should have been the effect of comey’s action, was that it would have repudiated the notion that hillary had done things illegal with the private email server. Too little too late.

        Seems to me that too many people are just sick and tired of political figures they figure are doing nothing for them as citizens. So their hopes came to be centered on this billowy guy.

        I hope to be pleasantly surprised that he’ll get up to speed quick and will be able to do some good things…(hey, on trumps coaxing, ford already decided to keep its small SUV plant in the U.S.) …but questions about what will happen when he has to deal with serious issues like syria and putin…or domestic crisis like ferguson type situations, are unnerving. Everyone hopes for the best…needs to…but through his appointments, Trump could be letting loose some very extreme people from U.S. politics, onto the U.S. public.

        When he’s done, will the U.S. really be back to the perceived greatness some seem to think this country once had and has no longer…or will he have just left a big mess which the nation will have to spend decades cleaning up?

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          B. Carfree November 19, 2016 at 10:32 am

          No, Trump did not cause Ford to keep a plant open. This lie, put out on Twitter by Trump and echoed by many news organizations, is typical of what is wrong in American media.

          Ford was considering moving the production of one model to Mexico in order to make more line space available to produce more units of a different model in that Kentucky plant. No jobs were ever on the line nor was the facility being considered for closure. In the end, Ford decided, independent of DJT, to not expand the production of any models and therefore there was no need to make any changes.

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            wsbob November 19, 2016 at 1:50 pm

            “…Ford was considering moving the production of one model to Mexico in order to make more line space available to produce more units of a different model in that Kentucky plant. No jobs were ever on the line nor was the facility being considered for closure. …” b carfree

            I listened to the newshour last night…pbs…but didn’t catch a part about ford not intending to close the plant down, regardless of whether the suv production had moved south of the border. Or that jobs weren’t going to be lost. I’ll ‘stay tuned’ for more that may corroborate with what you say. Thanks!

            What the commentators said in addition, and what makes sense to me, is that ford decided to not move the SUV production south, because execs saw benefit in getting on the good side of trump.

            Pete…I’m among those the email scandal has fascinated. Also, disgusted with wikileaks, who I think is done us no real favor by setting this wave of paranoia loose. Main thing for me that came out of that scandal, is it suggests hillary is too subject to naivety with regards to certain things that common sense is likely telling almost everyone else having any contact at all with a digital device. Which is basically that: if they want to, someone can hack your data.

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          Pete November 19, 2016 at 1:23 pm

          The email scandal fascinates me, because I think the irony of using an insecure email server is that it doesn’t contain the security mechanisms (confidentiality, non-repudiation) that the FBI would need to prove without a doubt that Hilary was violating policy, let alone any laws (disclosure is usually far more difficult to prove than non-compliance). If the government were to pursue some kind of conviction, it would likely cost US taxpayers a fortune (far more than we’re already paying the FBI to keep investigating).

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      wsbob November 18, 2016 at 6:15 pm

      “…We won the popular vote and won the cities and states…” kittens

      Barely won the popular vote. Never googled it, but about 50-50 is what I’ve heard. Half of the U.S. wants trump and co in office. A lot of people in this nation, need answers better than they’ve been given to date. They didn’t get them, so they voted in trump, hoping he’s got good ones. Watch out…newt may be coming back.

      It should not need to be mentioned that a “…this is war..” refrain is not likely to be much of a means of bringing about positive change. Acting on such refrains, a bunch of people fighting each other, taking to the streets and breaking out windows, resulting in million dollar damages, tends to be an exorbitant waste of time and money. Thinking, good ideas, and good answers, is better.

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        Chris I November 18, 2016 at 7:41 pm

        She is going to end up winning the popular vote by 1-2% margin, upwards of 2 million votes.

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          Random November 18, 2016 at 9:23 pm

          And 3.2 million of Hillary’s vote margin is coming out of California.

          Collectively, she was outvoted in the other 49 states.

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            dwk November 19, 2016 at 2:07 pm

            So California voters don’t count as much as voters in Ohio?

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              I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:58 pm

              Trump won Ohio 52% to 43%.

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                SE Rider November 20, 2016 at 1:06 pm

                whoosh!

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                David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:05 pm

                Neither got a majority overall. True, HC has more votes than DT, but it’s 47% vs 48%, the other 5% going to also-rans. And much lower turn-out than in 2008. Basically the Bernie Democrats stayed home, as did many Evangelical Republicans, while the non-partisan vote went way up, mostly for DT.

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              I voted for Trump! November 21, 2016 at 8:27 pm

              dwk,

              If we went only by the popular vote then candidates would only campaign in the heavily populated areas. AND Trump would have won by even more votes because he would have campaigned in D strongholds like Cal and NY where he had no chance to win a majority.

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            Chris I November 19, 2016 at 8:37 pm

            It’s interesting that you apply different value to people based on their place of residence. The US is not a true democracy, but the idea of equal value and equal voice is supported by the vast majority of American citizens. It’s disturbing that you are so quick to discount millions of people just because you don’t like something about them (where they live, what they look like, etc).

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              Hello, Kitty November 20, 2016 at 6:05 pm

              Voters in MN have a many-fold greater voice in the Senate than voters in CA. Unfair?

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              David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 6:05 pm

              How do you define a “true democracy”? Most countries are representative democracies to some extent or another. For example, the Queen in the UK is not elected at all, and the prime minister is the head of the largest party, but is only elected for his or her district only, like a congressperson.

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                Chris I November 21, 2016 at 6:58 am

                For example, the way that governors are elected in all 50 states. Or the way we elect senators and congressional representatives. Do you think voter turnout would be higher if voters in all 50 states knew their voice would count? As it stands now, tens of millions of voters are basically throwing their votes away, because they don’t live in a “purple” state. Voting Republican in Oregon? Tough luck. Want to vote for a 3rd party candidate? You might as well stay home.

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        Eric Leifsdad November 19, 2016 at 12:47 am
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        CaptainKarma November 19, 2016 at 12:23 pm

        Only half the voters voted. 1/2 divided by 2 = 1/4. That’s how many “wanted” either candidate. The fact is, very many of those did not want those candidates either, but were forced to vote for annointed sub-par candidates not of their choosing. Half the voters could not force themselves to ethically support either of these “leaders”.

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          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 12:45 pm

          I hope they are now satisfied with the consequences of their “ethical” decision. Unless you are protesting against the concept of democracy itself, not voting means not fulfilling your responsibilities as a citizen.

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            David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:13 pm

            All candidates knew the rules of the game beforehand. Had the result been reversed, I’m sure the roles would have been reversed, with Republican’s protesting and crying foul, and Democrats gloating. Imagine Gary Johnson winning. What would be your reaction then?

            In addition, Trump also said right after the election that the electoral college system ought to be abandoned. However, it only takes 18 of the smallest states to defeat any constitutional amendment to do so, and you can bet they will, along with several slightly larger states who also benefit from the system, like Oregon.

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      bikeninja November 18, 2016 at 6:32 pm

      I think it started further back than that 18 years ago . I remember wearing a black armband for a week in college when Reagan was elected. What we are facing today is not all that different. Trump is just a dollar store version of Reagan without the veneer of charm and smooth language. Behind the inflammatory retoric, the hate speech, and the demonization is something even worse. The desire on the part of these political forces to commoditize everything in the world and reduce it to its dollar value. Both parties are guilty of this and the only real difference is the shiny exterior. Trump is like the Terminator ( from the movie series) with android flesh burnt off to revel the scary robot underneath, while the democrats are the terminator with the veneer of human kindness still on top.

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        CaptainKarma November 19, 2016 at 12:27 pm

        Haha, I have a black braided para-cord bracelet I ztarted wearing, originally for if H won, but nor for trumble instead. Working on a plain black funeral flag as well.

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      Jon November 21, 2016 at 6:55 am

      I did not vote for Trump and oppose the vast majority of what he says. One might say that he won key traditional working class Democratic states like Wisconsin and Pennsylvania because of the way that manufacturing workers have been treated over the last 30 years. The part of the country that is now call the rust belt used to be a prosperous area filled with well paying unionized manufacturing workers making basic industrial and consumer items. You could get a very well paying job with very little education. Today there are very few well paying jobs for people with little education and as places like Japan, China, Mexico, Korea have seen growth in their middle class as steel mills and factories have closed in the rust belt an re-opened in other countries.

      Imagine if you grew up in the rust belt and saw all the factories close and jobs move to other countries. You saw a bunch of trade agreements that promised a better life but you did not see a better life. The cities dropped in population and home prices dropped. Then imagine if some candidate promised to bring the factories back and scrap all the trade agreements. Would you vote for that candidate?

      I grew up on the west coast where generally the population has been growing, the economy is based on more “knowledge” based jobs and has done much better than the rust belt.

      If I grew up in the rust belt I might look at the last 30 years and thought that there was a war waged against my way of life.

      I don’t agree with Trump but I think I have an idea of why won some of those key states.

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      meh November 21, 2016 at 7:08 am

      Clinton was impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice. Simply telling the truth about the affair would have avoided those charges.

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    wsbob November 18, 2016 at 5:43 pm

    Between him and the type of people he seems to be picking for his cabinet, trump may well throw to the wayside, or try to, anything and everything that doesn’t stand to make a profit in the grand quest to ‘make america great again.’

    It’s disturbing to think that 50 percent of the people in this country that voted, consciously voted for a guy like the donald…but there he is, looming over the next four to eight years of this country’s future, like a big gilded bird of prey. So far, I’ve not heard anything about him, or people it seems he prefers to associate with and rely upon for advice, that would suggest he cares anything about investing in infrastructure for walking and biking; how’s that kind of thing supposed to make any money for the nation?

    He may like like light rail better than walking and biking infrastructure, but it seems more likely to me, he’d prefer the lower buck bigger return of bus service. Even trump is likely to have to realize there’s a finite ability to keep on expanding the highway system as a means of meeting the nation’s travel needs.

    Anyone that really cares about the future of improvements to walking and biking in this country, if they aren’t already, can start to show they do, on an individual, personal level. Stop passing the buck by blaming ODOT and other transportation depts for not providing what you’d like, and want, for bike and walk infrastructure…

    …and the same in regards to people of political persuasion that run counter to your own views. Unless, whoever happens to be reading here…you’re some kind of model biking and walking citizen, a sterling example to your neighborhood, your city, and your nation, of what biking and walking should be. On a personal, individual level, there’s plenty of room for improvement, on the part of many of the people biking and walking.

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      I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 1:34 am

      Agree with your last 2 paragraphs wsbob.

      I did vote for the Donald. Biking is not a huge priority to me. It is not a huge priority to very many people – what- maybe 5% would call it a huge priority? This country has some very serious problems. Better biking infrastructure would be good but first you need a secure and safe country to put it in. Right now our country is not secure. 20 Trillion in debt could destroy us if interest rates go up. We have many tens of millions of people not working, working part time, working crappy jobs, etc. Healthcare premiums are exploding. Housing is not affordable. The list is endless. I voted for Trump because he has a solid track record of completing complex projects successfully, knows how to run a business, knows how government regulations stifle business and job creation, etc, so I think he has a chance of helping out Americans, and I hope he does it.

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      • Hello, Kitty
        Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 10:21 am

        The biggest problem we face is Climate Change. Yes, I know The Donald thinks it’s a big Chinese hoax, and that somehow 99% of the world’s scientists are in on it, and are somehow able to all keep a secret of such magnitude that exposing it would surely result in a Nobel prize.

        If we want to make America great again, we need to reassert our world leadership in addressing global issues that will profoundly affect everyone in the near future.

        Focusing on a wall is just petty and unbecoming of a country that wants to be “great”. Hungary just built a border fence. Do we aspire to be as great as Hungary?

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          Pete November 19, 2016 at 1:13 pm

          Hungary did not strive for greatness… their wall is only 13′ and ours will be 40′!!

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            Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 3:41 pm

            Good new indeed! We can still be greater than Hungary!

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          I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:18 pm

          Saudi has a 600 mile wall.

          People will give more credibility to Climate Change when 90% of Ds are riding bikes everywhere and have sold their cars. I’m not holding my breath waiting for that to happen.

          Fact is, if the USA stopped all fossil fuel burning today, there would be no noticeable difference in global warming. None.

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            Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:21 pm

            We cannot let the Saudis be greater than us with their 600 mile wall. We will be great again!!!! And Mexico will pay for it!!!!

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          • Hello, Kitty
            Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:23 pm

            As for fossil fuels, you are absolutely right. It will take some time for the slowed warming to be noticed. These things, as you seem to know, move slowly. All the more reason to cut emissions now.

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            Pete November 20, 2016 at 2:57 pm

            The Kingdom’s wall is less than half the distance of the US-Mexico border and designed to protect against a significantly larger and immediate threat than immigration. Israel’s 455-mile long wall in the West Bank costs over $260M/yr in maintenance, and I’ve personally watched kids climb over it on wooden ladders (under Raytheon-provided tethered helium balloons carrying FLIR infrared cameras). How much has President-elect Trump said that our wall will cost to build and maintain? (I’m genuinely curious because I tuned out most of last year’s election noise, er, news).

            On climate change and bicycling, I don’t believe there’s a significant relationship. Just as we’ve seen with the fuel efficiency of motorized vehicles, bicycling had its biggest jump when gas prices hit their highest (almost a decade ago?), and its growth has since tapered. Yes, there are people who make significant compromises to minimize their carbon footprints, but I suspect that’s not a high percentage of bicyclists (plus I’m gonna bet they’re mostly Gs and Is and not Ds ;).

            No, I don’t think people will give true credibility to climate change when there is money to be made (and jobs to be had) that contradict its mitigation.

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              I voted for Trump! November 20, 2016 at 8:19 pm

              Building the wall is trivial. The Saudi wall is fairly robust, ours would not need to be so robust – they’re guarding against military invasion.

              Fact is, we don’t need a wall really – all we need are strict immigration laws and the will to enforce them. But, a wall will not hurt. It’s stupid that it is even an issue – had our government done their duty for the past 30, or 40 or 50 years, we’d wouldn’t be discussing it. They failed to do their duty and that’s why we’re discussing it and one of the reasons for the DJT win.

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                Pete November 21, 2016 at 9:52 am

                Not sure what “duty” you’re saying our government failed to do over the last several decades. Immigration has been significantly responsible for the economic growth of this country since CEOs starting pushing Congress to reduce H1-B visa restrictions back in the 1980s. Just like I mentioned with climate change, if there is money to be made and jobs to be had with increasing the number of people legally moving into this country – or exploiting the people who illegally move into it – then talk like this is nothing but rhetorical.

                Illegal immigration is another story, but not unlike illegal drugs. It’s a matter of scale. Reagan launched a war on drugs decades ago, but California now loses more people to opioid abuse than to car crashes, and we just became the latest state to ‘legalize’ pot for recreation. The quote I heard from a border guard in Arizona should put it into perspective: “We can build a bigger wall but they’ll just get bigger ladders, and build deeper tunnels.”

                I predict time will show Trump’s wall to be yet another waste of taxpayer money, if it ever gets built.

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                Hello, Kitty November 21, 2016 at 11:13 am

                Mexican taxpayer money… right?

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                Kevin November 22, 2016 at 9:18 am

                The government didn’t “do its duty” because most were OK with turning the other way while our system exploited people for their labor. Enjoy cheap produce? Vegetables? Restaurant service? Landscaping? Meat? Janitorial service? The list goes on, and on, and on.

                So, did the government not “do it’s duty” for you? Will you go walk a vegetable field at 05:30? Do you pay into SSI and then never have a chance to recoup? Do you live in sub-standard conditions with fear the “government” will come whisk you away (maybe we all should start worrying about this, now)?

                The (willful?) ignorance is blinding.

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                Kevin November 22, 2016 at 9:19 am

                Jonathan – if that’s too mean and not in the spirit of the Board then please redact the comment. Thanks.

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            Carrie November 20, 2016 at 7:45 pm

            It’s not about reversing anything at this point. It’s not reversable by simple actions at this point. It’s all about acknowledging that climate change is real, is here, is happening, and we MUST plan for it in how we live and work and eat. Because what got us here certainly won’t get us there.

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        wsbob November 19, 2016 at 1:28 pm

        ivft…I’m glad you could find something in what I wrote, that relates to your thoughts on the manner in which people use the roads in the U.S. for walking and biking! It’s very important I think, that people walking and biking take the opportunity their mode of travel affords them, to help make a strong case for the importance that those modes of travel have to helping out in dealing with some of the major basic day to day community travel issues the country faces.

        If design and infrastructure for walking and biking were simply easily expendable components of travel infrastructure, they could just be dumped, especially if doing so could somehow improve the efficiency, in positive ways, of travel and transport by motor vehicle. Doesn’t seem to me that they are easily expendable, because what’s likely true, is that infrastructure for walking and biking, becomes of ever more critical importance to arresting the growth of road congestion arising from excessive motor vehicle use.

        While the U.S. definitely has priorities that are more serious than walking and biking infrastructure, it’s not likely to do any good for city and community streets and roads to become completely strangled with congestion, because the only way of using them for practical travel and transport, is with motor vehicles.

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          I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:21 pm

          The D party, strong advocates for all kinds of transportation options, are in total control in this state and in Portland. They have been for at least 2 years now. Time for them to demonstrate the D utopian dream in Portland – just leave the rest of us out of it. 🙂

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            David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:18 pm

            Yes, the Oregon D party also voted to raise speed limits on I-5, not long after they voted in favor of the CRC. Very progressive.

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            Pete November 22, 2016 at 10:21 am

            The support for transportation options is not as polarized as you make it out to be. Other than Blumenaur, who stands out as a bike/ped advocate across the entire country, I’ve not seen other OR Dems do exceptional things to support alternative transportation. My rep, Greg Walden, is a Republican who has strongly supported transportation options, including the gorge trail. (He is a member of the Congressional Bike Caucus, along with Dem Rep DeFazio).

            https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/HWY/HCRH/docs/WaldenODOTTIGER42716.pdf

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        Robert Burchett November 19, 2016 at 7:24 pm

        . . .knows how to run a business. . .

        Tell Atlantic City that.

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    TWA November 18, 2016 at 6:07 pm

    J, I would like to hear your thoughts on where one might best devote ones time and / funds to support bicycling and alternative transportation in Portland.

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      I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 1:36 am

      Why don’t you work with Ted Wheeler, the new mayor? He’s a cyclist.

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        David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:20 pm

        For that matter, so is Charlie Hales, quite a good one too.

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    Andrew N November 18, 2016 at 6:14 pm

    “Stop passing the buck by blaming ODOT and other transportation depts for not providing what you’d like, and want, for bike and walk infrastructure…”

    Criticism of a retrograde state agency whose decisions have life-or-death consequences = “passing the buck”. SMH. I’ll pass this absurd logic on to Mitch York.

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      wsbob November 19, 2016 at 1:04 pm

      Some people seem to like to have someone or something to blame for various things they’re upset about having happened, whether or not whom they blame, is the culpable party . It’s not ODOT’s fault, or that of the bridge lane configuration, that a bad driver let his car go out of control and kill a guy on a bike.

      I’m not sure why you call ODOT a retrograde agency. For the public it has to serve, by the priorities set before it, and the budget it’s got to work with, the dept seems to do quite a good job. Some people are unhappy that the dept can’t designate more of its design priority and budget to the small, 10-20 percent of the people using the road by bike. Understandable, but don’t blame ODOT for what I believe it has little control over. If you need to blame someone, blame the people paying the taxes that are expecting their money to prioritize use of the road with motor vehicles. They’re ODOT’s boss.

      In passing, I’ve talked about road maintenance and road use modes of travel, several times with a guy that works at the ODOT center up on Sylvan. He told me about his crew, their workload and the budget. Left me with a favorable impression. Where they can, they help to keep the infrastructure good for biking. The guy I’ve talked to, bikes as a commuter mostly, I think, but maybe some recreational riding as well.

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        David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:24 pm

        Compared to NCDOT, ODOT is a left-wing political organization. Compared to most state DOTs in fact. Trust me when I say, “it could be worse”, because it usually is. I’m hard pressed to find any state DOT more liberal and progressive than ODOT. DC isn’t a state, so it doesn’t count. Maybe Colorado or Minnesota?

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    Tom Hardy November 18, 2016 at 7:01 pm

    I’m stirred up again.
    Speaking of passing the buck this week. The Donald appointed Bonner as his personnel advisor on national security. Unfortunately he is on the record as being the official mouthpiece for David Duke. This carries well when the Donald commented on the protesters at the Dakota pipeline. “The protesters need to be arrested and deported!”
    Bonner came back and told him that the protesters were “Native American Indians on reservation lands”
    End of that comment.
    The Donald settled the fraud suit for $25 million to 6,000 students that paid him $35,000 each for tuition to his bogus University. Most had to take student loans from New Jersey. New Jersey student loans cannot be cleared by bankruptcy. The loans are at 18% interest. The $4000 per student only pays for part of the annual interest payment for the loans.
    Gov. Christie set this up for Donald.
    The business plan is set up so Donald makes al of the decisions. Bad ones, the responsibility falls with who ever carries them out. Good ones he takes credit for.

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      wsbob November 18, 2016 at 11:53 pm

      “…President-elect Donald Trump has offered retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn the role of national security advisor, …” cnn

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    Caitlin D November 18, 2016 at 8:55 pm

    “I’m still having a hard time focusing on cycling news and policy”

    Same here. What an emotional roller coaster these last 10 days have been, with no end in sight. Thank you for the work you put into this site!

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    bendite November 18, 2016 at 9:04 pm

    As a fellow white guy, “If you have the privilege of being unafraid, you have the responsiblity to do fearless work.” is the best quote from another white guy I’ve read in the last 10 days. Maybe someone can put that on a t shirt? With trump saying he wants to invest in infrastructure, maybe there’s someway to have cycling get in on it? Are there any xenophobes at the top end of Trek that might have an in? (kidding, sort of).

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      Kevin November 18, 2016 at 11:37 pm

      Agreed. I read it twice.

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    JeffS November 18, 2016 at 9:30 pm

    I’m hoping that one day, Dems will take responsibility for the fact that they handed the presidency to Trump.

    It’s yet to be seen how many days, weeks, months or years it may be before everyone stops looking for someone to blame and attempts even a modicum of introspection.

    Hillary Clinton was a horrible candidate. She would have been a horrible president and I, for one, am proud to have voted against her. Democrats need to do better. Cast off your corporate masters. Cast off the regressive left. Stop running candidates whose supporters can muster no better compliment than “better than the other guy”.

    See you in four years. In the meantime, Portland, I’ll be paying my bills and raising my kid. Feel free to continue to tax the hell of out me to pay for the people who are doing neither.

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    Keith November 18, 2016 at 9:34 pm

    Jonathan – Thanks for your excellent and thoughtful article. My initial reaction to the election is threefold. First, we’ve had a relatively tranquil 2-3 decades compared to the past. My parents were born right after WWI, followed by the Depression, WWII, Korean War, and Cold War – not exactly a picnic. It was scary. Politics were so divisive during the founding of our country it was amazing we ever got launched. The next few years probably won’t be pretty, but we’ll get through this. Second, as you indicate, we need to focus on what we can do locally. For example, we can take our own actions to reduce the impact of climate change regardless of the course is taken in Washington, DC. Third, we need to avoid simplifying the conversation into rhetoric and stereotyping people or groups of which we’re not a part (see David Brook’s article in the NYC: http://nyti.ms/2f6wG6t ).

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      I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 1:45 am

      Excellent advice in that last sentence Keith. The left engages in WAY too much calling the other guy hateful names, making false accusations, and general extremism and that played a part in this election – people are SICK of it.

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        dwk November 19, 2016 at 8:59 am

        You voted for a birther and you lecture us????

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          I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:30 pm

          That was started by HRC in the 2000 primary campaign. Trump just kept it going. That said, no original, undisputed BC was ever produced. Doesn’t matter now.

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        Mossby Pomegranate November 19, 2016 at 2:15 pm

        Condescending progressives belittled people for too long. And now it’s blown back in your faces. Not everybody wins all the time. That’s reality.

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:24 pm

          And in this case, we all lose.

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    rachel b November 18, 2016 at 11:36 pm

    You do great work, Jonathan. Thank you!

    Just wanted to add “women” to this list:
    “…people of color, people with lower incomes — are the ones likely to be hurt the most by the Trump administration’s actions and policies.”

    I think the normalization of the now run-of-the-mill oppression and sabotage that happens to women in this country runs so deep, we just forget about it–even when it’s right in our faces. I’ve seen that tuning out thing (as it regards women) happen over and over again. We all like to flatter ourselves that we’re “post feminist.”

    I think sexism played a much larger role in this election than any of us, collectively, are willing to acknowledge. Yet.

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      rachel b November 18, 2016 at 11:38 pm

      (Please don’t moderate my previous comment out of existence! Not sure why posts referring to sexism are getting flagged and rejected–??)

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 10:24 am

      And yet… a large number of women voted for Trump.

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        rachel b November 19, 2016 at 12:28 pm

        Women can be their own worst enemy. Lookit what Susan B and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were up against, for example. Stockholm Syndrome. I personally think of it as “Trying to Get the Boyfriend.”

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          rachel b November 19, 2016 at 12:30 pm

          (This is a common thing in oppressed populations, as I’m sure I don’t need to tell you. When you’ve got little to no power, one of the only powers you may feel you have is to please the ones in power. There’s the illusion it also keeps you safe. And it does keep you a little safer…usually)

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 1:05 pm

          I think it may be more that many women don’t see this as an election about women, but were instead focused on economic and security issues. I’ve heard several post-election interviews with female voters who chose Trump, which tend to support this view.

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            Maddy November 19, 2016 at 1:40 pm

            I totally disagree. I think many women, and most men, still have an issue with women leaders. I had this conversation with a good friend who is a female professional, and kept telling me that Hillary isn’t likeable (she was still planning to voter for her). I asked her, and everyone that complained to me about Hillary, to name a female who IS likable and electable. No one could.

            That is very sad. Women are 50% of the population, and not one person I have encountered can name an electable female candidate because we cannot tolerate the personality traits in women necessary for leadership roles.

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              rachel b November 19, 2016 at 2:08 pm

              Hear, hear, Maddy. I think it’ll be some time yet before we grapple with sexism in our country–a sad fact this election made painfully apparent to me. I kept getting excited we were having the conversation–finally!–then it’d inevitably peter out in the same ol’ tried and true way. Almost all I’ve heard, post-election, is a further minimizing and shushing of the idea that sexism played any role at all.

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            • Hello, Kitty
              Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 3:50 pm

              Does anyone think Trump is likable?

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                rachel b November 19, 2016 at 7:02 pm

                Lots! At least, more likable than Hillary. That’s the point, that’s the horror. If we took a poll right now, Genghis Khan would rate “more likable” than Hillary.

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              • Hello, Kitty
                Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:25 pm

                Well, you have to admit, Genghis Khan would make a hell of a dinner guest.

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                rachel b November 19, 2016 at 11:36 pm

                I want to have a beer with him.

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          SE Rider November 19, 2016 at 7:22 pm

          I read an interesting piece a few weeks ago, that said that some younger women today believe that a first female president is inevitable, so didn’t see urgency to vote for Clinton (who they viewed as an non-optimal candidate) just because she would be the first female president.
          I thought that was an interesting take.

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            rachel b November 19, 2016 at 11:37 pm

            OK. That little nugget of information just depressed the hell out of me. What a wan, filled-with-ennui little nation we live in.

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            David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:34 pm

            In Britain/UK, the present head of state got her job from her dad, who got it from his brother, who got it from their dad, etc etc, more or less within the same family since 1481, and the same clan since 1066. Meanwhile, they are on their second female head of government (prime minister), both of whom rather ironically came from the Conservative party, rather than from the Liberals or from Labour. Let’s face it folks, the first female president of the USA will be a Republican, not a Democrat.

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              rachel b November 20, 2016 at 9:10 pm

              You may be right.

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            • Hello, Kitty
              Hello, Kitty November 21, 2016 at 11:16 am

              Palin 2020!

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                rachel b November 21, 2016 at 10:59 pm

                I knew that was coming… The horror, the horror…

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                David Hampsten November 23, 2016 at 8:50 am

                Personally, I prefer Governor Nikki Haley of South Carolina, a moderate Republican, now nominated for UN envoy.

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        EmilyG November 21, 2016 at 9:50 am

        A large number of *white* women. Women of color overwhelmingly voted for Clinton.

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          rachel b November 21, 2016 at 11:02 pm

          Indeed. I took it HK was referring to the pale ones.

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      Pete November 20, 2016 at 8:22 pm

      “Just wanted to add “women” to this list… likely to be hurt the most by the Trump administration’s actions and policies.”

      Excellent point, and the most important reason I felt the need to vote in this election. I’m neither feminist nor homosexual, but I am strongly for the rights of women and homosexuals in this country, and they will be impacted terribly by the next full Supreme Court bench.

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        rachel b November 21, 2016 at 11:03 pm

        Well, then you are a feminist! 🙂

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          Pete November 22, 2016 at 10:23 am

          Shhh… don’t tell anyone. Where I grew up, I’d get my a.. kicked for that! 😉

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    still riding after all that November 19, 2016 at 1:02 am

    JeffS – “Hillary Clinton was a horrible candidate. She would have been a horrible president and I, for one, am proud to have voted against her.”

    Thank you, JeffS. I voted against the lying pig Hillary, also. She has taken untold millions from foreign governments, and would no doubt have handed over the keys to America to our enemies. I find her far more disgusting than Trump, and trust me, having grown up on the east coast I can tell you he’s an obnoxious ego freak. Still nowhere near as bad as Hillary.

    And as for her supporters, am I the only one aware of the “protests” that were really RIOTS in Portland for the past 10 days? Smashing windows of cars and businesses, setting fires in dumpsters, throwing bricks and launching fireworks at the police? Grow up! Setting fire to the American flag, in particular, really ticked me off. If that’s how Hillary’s supporters act, they deserve all the oppression they get.

    I’m aware that my political views do not align with the views of some of my fellow BikePortland readers. Please review previous paragraph.

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    Mike November 19, 2016 at 5:41 am

    This is America’s Hitler moment. We’ll just have to let it play out and see what rises from the ashes. In the meantime make it work for you and have fun with it.

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 10:31 am

      Whatever you may say about Trump, he is not Hitler.

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        wsbob November 19, 2016 at 12:37 pm

        At least…not yet. The dismal impact of that particular entity’s extreme views, was the sum of many willing contributors and enablers. Which is why it seems to me, the significance of our president elect’s choices for his administration, are so important to consider.

        This past week, he’s already selected a few people known to have expressed to the public, some very negative remarks about certain groups of faith and ethnic origin. It’s possible though, that the pres elect will back away somewhat from the extreme remarks and viewpoints some people believe were the ticket to his winning the election. But how far can he back away from those positions he ran on, and still have the support of people that voted for him?

        If he could the jobs back, of everyone that lost them and never recovered, from the last eight years, and more, that might be all he’d need to do…people would the let the other items on their agenda, ride.

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 3:45 pm

          He won’t be able to deliver on almost anything that he promised.

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            David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:38 pm

            You are absolutely correct. Congress will block him, especially members of congress who are even more conservative than he is, as will the courts. Checks and balances.

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          I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 4:52 pm

          wsbob said: “This past week, he’s already selected a few people known to have expressed to the public, some very negative remarks about certain groups of faith and ethnic origin.”

          Got any specifics on these remarks? As a Trump voter I can give my opinion if you can cite specifics.

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    TonyH November 19, 2016 at 8:55 am

    There’s a story about Ben Franklin. Immediately after the Constitutional Convention in 1787, a woman asked him what sort of government we could expect. “A Republic, Madam, if you can keep it”. Now, more than HALF of registered voters don’t vote. And look at the results.

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      rachel b November 19, 2016 at 10:23 am

      Heh. First thing I thought was…more than half didn’t vote then, either–she wasn’t allowed to vote, for example. And didn’t get to “keep” anything. So shut your condescending piehole, Franklin! 😉

      But I second your dismay! To have the vote and waste it is negligent, to say the least. Sigh.

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 10:32 am

      Those who didn’t vote got exactly what they asked for.

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        Eric Leifsdad November 19, 2016 at 11:09 am

        Most of those who did vote found that their first choice had been removed from the ballot by the primaries process. We need multi-mark ballots, not two parties gaming against each other.

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 12:58 pm

          Yes, there are better mechanisms than the one we use, and I totally support implementing them. However, that is not an excuse for not casting a ballot. Vote third party if you want, or even don’t mark any candidate in a race where all are unpalatable. But not bothering to even send in your ballot is not a defensible choice.

          The results of this election illustrate the dangers of abdicating your responsibilities to others. If you made that choice, you got what you asked for.

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            David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:40 pm

            You can always write-in. I did, for Bernie. Not that it made any difference, here in NC Trump got over 50% of the popular vote.

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            BB November 21, 2016 at 4:10 pm

            What’s the difference between not marking a ballot and not sending one in? That doesn’t make any sense..

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        Pete November 19, 2016 at 1:06 pm

        I tried to vote for an end to the two-party system and enactment of the National Popular Vote Bill, but I didn’t see it on my ballot.

        http://www.nationalpopularvote.com/

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tyler-lewis/why-we-should-abolish-the_1_b_8961256.html

        http://www.politifact.com/florida/article/2016/nov/17/electoral-college-vs-popular-vote-could-states-a/

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 3:43 pm

          I wanted to vote for a carbon tax, but it wasn’t on my ballot either. It’s multiple-choice, not an open-ended essay.

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            I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 9:49 pm

            I thought Oregon had some kind of carbon tax scheme. No?

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        longgone November 19, 2016 at 2:17 pm

        Some of us didn’t give a crap.
        While I enjoy 97.3% of everything you comment on Hello Kitty, ( you are my favorite commenter to follow here ..btw. ) the notion that I, or others who refrained from voting deserve what we got, and would be better of with Clinton is complete conjecture. I will say I enjoy your positive outlook posted earlier above that it is far too early to be hysterical over the Trump victory. I wanted neither for President. I voted for no one. I have that right. I am not losing sleep over any of it.

        In addition…unlike Jonathan who thinks he must be brave despite having few fears, I am afraid of much in this world, ..despite being a white male.
        The left has lost me.
        The right doesn’t have me either.
        I gave up on feminism years ago.
        Everyone is insane.
        I have to go now.
        I’m going to go on a bike ride with my child.
        Later.

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 3:59 pm

          Forgoing the responsibilities of citizenship may be within your rights, but it is still an abdication of responsibility. You may have picked up on the fact that I’m not exactly a fan of HRC, and (much) less so of DJT, but I still filled out my ballot and sent it in. Even if you find your choices for president too distasteful to pick anyone, there are still other important issues to be decided.

          So while I support your right to cast a blank ballot, I am much less sympathetic with any “protest” that is indistinguishable from laziness.

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            longgone November 19, 2016 at 4:31 pm

            Oh, I vote on local measures and positions… I just refrained from voting for the presidential race this year.
            I literally could not do it in good conscience.
            Peace.

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            • Hello, Kitty
              Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:27 pm

              Sorry — that wasn’t clear from your post.

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    Kevin November 19, 2016 at 11:20 am

    Nice and relevant read: http://billmoyers.com/story/can-cities-counter-power-president-elect-donald-trump/

    Change comes from the bottom up. I don’t want to sound trite, but think global and act local. We are in the fortunate position to continue to advocate and support livability and matters that are important to us living in the city/metro region. The future is in our cities. Let’s make them examples of shining beacons on the hill, for all the world (and the middle part of our country) to follow.

    I see the mission and propose of this forum as directly relevant to our future. Think bigger than the bike — it’s a means of radical social change.

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      Kevin November 19, 2016 at 11:22 am

      Hey Jonathan – Am I now specifically moderated, or are all posts being moderated?

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        Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 19, 2016 at 11:39 am

        Hi Kevin,

        Thanks for asking.

        No. you are not being singled out. Some but not all comments are being held back. On posts like this I pay extra attention to the comments.

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        • Hello, Kitty
          Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 1:00 pm

          I’ve noticed that combining the words “Trump” and “Nazi” (as I did earlier) seems to get posts moderated. I wonder why that would be? It’s almost as if the bots think you might be saying something inflammatory!

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            rachel b November 19, 2016 at 2:12 pm

            I think the bots also leery of “jerk.”

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              rachel b November 19, 2016 at 2:13 pm

              Aha! I was right! Test comment w/ bot-trigger word awaiting moderation. 🙂

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              Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 19, 2016 at 2:17 pm

              I AM THE BOTS AND I DON’T LIKE MEAN WORDS.

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              • Hello, Kitty
                Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 3:46 pm

                Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto.

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                rachel b November 19, 2016 at 7:03 pm

                🙂 Sorry, The Bots! I only ever use it in the literal sense. 😉

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          Kevin November 22, 2016 at 9:56 am

          Makes sense, thanks for the answer.

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    I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 6:07 pm

    FYI, The Donald on his cycle:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0G5Lq2LGt4

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    SE November 19, 2016 at 6:41 pm

    I really dislike the national election results , but we lived thru 8 years of GWB with no fatal scars to show for it.

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      Chris I November 19, 2016 at 8:39 pm

      We survived, but about 5,000 US soldiers, and over 100,000 Iraqi citizens were killed. $1.7 billion spent on a pointless war, and we end up with an even less stable region, enabling groups like ISIS to thrive.

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        I voted for Trump! November 19, 2016 at 9:56 pm

        Hillary thought the war was justified back in 2002 – that’s why she voted for it – see 1 minute video below. They went based on the info they had at the time. AND remember 9/11 – we were attacked as I recall, and the hit to our economy was probably larger than the cost of the war. I think your 1.7 billion figure is off by a factor of 1000. Here’s why we went to war:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p03k4Gq-laI

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        B. Carfree November 20, 2016 at 9:10 am

        The last analysis I saw put the cost at over $4 Trillion (my that would have purchased a lot of solar panels, wind mills, transit and cycling facilities) and the Iraqi body count was put at over a million by researchers at Johns Hopkins even before W’s surge. Add in the millions of Syrian refugees and deaths and the impact of W is going to be felt for a long time, and not in a good way.

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        SE Rider November 20, 2016 at 1:15 pm

        But hey, at least the economy was doing really well!………

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          David Hampsten November 20, 2016 at 5:45 pm

          And then there is Vietnam, started by Kennedy, continued by Johnson, ended by Nixon.

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            Chris I November 21, 2016 at 7:00 am

            What does that have to do with GWB’s presidential term?

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              David Hampsten November 21, 2016 at 6:53 pm

              There was a comment about Republicans starting pointless wars, as GWB did, rather than saying that GWB was an idiot that started a pointless war, who just happened to be a Republican. America has a long history of both Democrat and Republican presidents starting expensive and pointless wars, as well as continuing rather than ending them.

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:53 pm

      You mean aside from two wars, one of which has become the longest we’ve ever been engaged in and is still very much ongoing… and the stain of torturing people and locking them up without trial.

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      • Hello, Kitty
        Hello, Kitty November 19, 2016 at 8:54 pm

        Uh… yeah, what he said.

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    Robert Burchett November 19, 2016 at 7:54 pm

    . . .calling the other guy hateful names. . .

    It’s quite unnecessary to call. . .names, or accuse him of stuff. It’s sufficient to quote what. . .said. Of course denials will be made in the face of the record and clear living memory.

    The polls were wrong because people who were ashamed of what they meant to do didn’t want to talk about it. Eight percent undecided? My arse.

    I thought all along that. . .meant to screw the Republican Party. Obviously that belief is a bit shaken although he didn’t appear to be playing to win at all times. However I will bet $50.00 with the first taker that. . .commits some major act of faithlessness against the Rs before the four years are up. That’s not casting asparagus, it’s a sporting proposition.

    And Jonathan, how does a person pronounce Rs, anyway?

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    I voted for Trump! November 20, 2016 at 1:47 am

    I do think I’ve found the answer to how to use your strength in uncertain times. The R party has no power in Portland and none in the state either. You can create Portland Utopia right here. There is no political force stopping you, am I right? WHAT are you waiting for? You may never have a better opportunity!

    I’d recommend the city council, the new mayor, the governor, and the D mayors of all the major cities in the state, pass a resolution to refuse all federal monies during DJTs term in office and let him know that you will go it alone; at least in the Portland city limits, maybe in other places. Barricade all streets into Portland, no cars allowed – exceptions for emergency vehicles – no fossil fuel burning after June 2017 – get Solar City to install solar electric and solar hot water on every roof, south facing wall, lawn, etc by July 1, 2017. On July 4, declare Independence Day from fossil fuels and fossil fuel pollution. Pass laws outlawing any gun or knife within the city limits. Invite, with open arms, every refugee and undocumented person into the city, no questions asked. On election day, require no voter ID (I’ll vote in every PDX precinct at least once) from any voter. Yes it will look odd when a city of 600K, has 2 or 3 million votes cast, but that’s OK – all votes should count, right? Every day for the next 4 years, burn DJT in effigy in the center of the city, and riot and smash cars (you can’t use them anyway) for 2 hours while shouting “This is WAR” and “Not My President”. No more private property either – anyone can use any home they want and can shower with any person they choose. But no “grabbing”, etc – that’s not cool. And no cops – they’re mean to people – besides you no longer have guns or knives so no need for cops. No rules on pot or any other drugs. For the sake of social justice and to make reparations all minorities get free food, school, health care, bicycles, etc. Every person in government gets his/her own email server; plus, all paper and electronic records shall be destroyed in a bonfire once per quarter (just throw the whole computer in the fire and get new a one). Minimum wage is $45/hour, except for minorities – they get minimum $50 for reparations. Everyone works an 8-hour day shift, 4 days per week but gets paid for 5 days work (40 hr/wk). Everyone gets 2 weeks off from Dec 16 to Jan 1; and 1 month off in August; and free child care, 6 months paid maternity leave for the mother AND father; except 7 months for minorities – for reparations.

    Let me know when it’s all in place and I’m MOVING to PDX!!!!! 🙂 🙂

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 21, 2016 at 1:01 am

      Well, you have a lot of interesting proposals, but what I’m really interested in is these ideas about men and women showering together. You keep mentioning this, so you’re probably as intrigued as I am. Where did you hear about this, and where can I learn more? Have you tried it? I mean, who knows? It might actually be fun. Love your ideas!

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        rachel b November 21, 2016 at 11:13 pm

        Also: can we use the freely taken stranger shower’s toiletries? Or do we have to carry them around? Towels? Loofahs?

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      Chris I November 21, 2016 at 7:02 am

      Please remember to take your medications.

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    SE November 20, 2016 at 9:40 am

    I had (past tense) an acquaintance who was so anti-HRC that he’d vote for anybody else except her. I didn’t understand the hate.

    But after this weeks revelations about false news on FB , the light went on. he is a guy w/o a computer and accesses the web with his cell. FB is his thing and doesn’t surf anywhere else.

    he would quote those stories that have shown to be planted. That strategy of misinformation sure worked to influence him.

    No, I don’t know if he would have voted (or even did vote) differently w/o FB, but it’s possible…. 🙁

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      I voted for Trump! November 20, 2016 at 1:02 pm

      Wow! I missed the revelations about false news on FB, and didn’t see any of it because I don’t use FB. I get my news from the internet and radio, and the local newspaper mostly.

      What were some of the “false news” stories?

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    rh November 20, 2016 at 10:41 am

    What’s really helping me is to take a break from all the news sites. All they say is what ‘could’ happen if Trump does X, etc… I recommend everyone does an information diet.

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    SE November 20, 2016 at 11:03 am

    maybe ,,,go live in the bubble ??

    https://youtu.be/vKOb-kmOgpI

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    dan November 20, 2016 at 11:22 am

    I voted for Trump!
    JM,
    There is no evidence that Trump had help from the Russians in this election. It’s possible they did, but there is no evidence. If you have evidence (not hearsay), provide a link.
    The Rs have not tried to suppress anyone from voting – requiring an ID to prove who you are when you vote is not voter suppression – there is no legitimate argument against it – although the left falsely says there is.

    Are you familiar with Michael Roger’s statements on the hacking of the DNC e-mail?
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/nsa-chief-adm-michael-rogers-speaks-candidly-of-russias-use-of-wikileaks-in-u-s-election/

    As far as voter suppression, how about North Carolina counties losing a court case about removing African American voters from voter rolls?
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-north-carolina-voter-purge-ruling-20161104-story.html

    Or how about this story about how red states have reduced the number of polling places dramatically, disproportionately impacting non-white voters.
    https://www.thenation.com/article/there-are-868-fewer-places-to-vote-in-2016-because-the-supreme-court-gutted-the-voting-rights-act/

    These are facts, are you able to acknowledge them? Or is it too hard to admit that Trump won the election by means that are less than aboveboard?

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    Jonah November 20, 2016 at 12:10 pm

    Some of us who ride bikes are bringing back Bike Swarm as a tactic, though not necessarily as an organization, with skillshares every Thursday at 6pm, same location as TNR.

    https://www.facebook.com/events/1338992072777533/

    We are asking folks that they join or form an organization to help educate themselves and keep each other accountable in a world where we need to unpack a lot of shit.

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    SE November 20, 2016 at 3:46 pm

    I voted for Trump!
    Wow! I missed the revelations about false news on FB, and didn’t see any of it because I don’t use FB. I get my news from the internet and radio, and the local newspaper mostly.
    What were some of the “false news” stories?
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    https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&authuser=0&q=fake+news+facebook&oq=fake+news+facebook&gs_l=news-cc.1.0.43j43i53.5462.15236.0.17877.18.7.0.11.11.0.150.771.2j5.7.0…0.0…1ac.1.rm55BiYFIZY

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    I voted for Trump! November 20, 2016 at 8:02 pm

    dan,

    Your “facts” aren’t.

    There is speculation that the Rooskies gave info to Wikileaks, but no one knows for sure. Go to Wikipedia and open “wikileaks”.

    Whoever hacked the DNC emails, I congratulate them and our nation owes them a debt of gratitude for revealing a lot of corruption – if you don’t believe me ask a Bernie supporter.

    That NC judge was appointed by BHO – she’s not likely to be impartial. Purging of voter rolls is common practice. You may find comfort in the fact that DJT beat HRC by over 150,000 votes in NC so 4000 or so, IF they were cheated out of a vote would not have made a difference.

    I’ll bet many polling places have disappeared due to mail-in voting, etc. I’d prefer if everyone had to show up at the polls, show photo ID, have their name checked off a list of eligible voters, then go into the booth to vote. That’s the way it was when I first started voting. Current methods allow too much room for fraud.

    I am not convinced that DJT cheated to win. I would easily believe that HRC did cheat – that’s her standard MO as we’ve all seen.

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      dan November 21, 2016 at 9:22 am

      If you had said up front that your opinion wouldn’t be changed, regardless of facts (which, after all, are well-known for their liberal bias), you would have saved me a few wasted minutes.

      Tell me this: when the smoking gun inevitably appears that proves beyond reasonable doubt that Russia hacked the DNC’s e-mails, how will you respond? Please try to be honest.

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        I voted for Trump! November 21, 2016 at 12:10 pm

        I would be thankful that Russia exposed the corruption in the DNC that contributed to her loss because I think her policies are bad for the country.

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    Beth H November 20, 2016 at 9:24 pm

    I am being faced with a hard look at my mortality because of the election outcome.

    I am fifty-three years old, too young and still too functional to think about dying anytime soon.

    But if the ACA is repealed, or simply allowed to die under its own weight, the fact, without any drama, is that I WILL GET SICK AND DIE.

    Without access to medications and treatment, I cannot stay healthy enough to work for at least part of my living. I am unable to work full-time because of my chronic illness, which is treatable but so far incurable. Since there is no such thing as partial disability in my case, I must cobble everything together as best I can, all the while keeping my income in the murky gray area between being poor enough qualifying for Medicaid while still being able to keep a roof over my head. It’s not easy.

    My preexisting condition is not a choice. It is heredity. Penalizing me for heredity is tantamount to nothing less than legislated eugenics. If this is where we are really headed as a country, as a society, then perhaps I should get my affairs in order sooner. Because I see no other way out of this. Do you?

    https://shar.es/1IV7l7

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      I voted for Trump! November 20, 2016 at 9:42 pm

      BH said: “But if the ACA is repealed, or simply allowed to die under its own weight, the fact, without any drama, is that I WILL GET SICK AND DIE.”

      Are you concerned that without the ACA your pre-existing condition will prevent your access to insurance? Trump says he is for keeping the pre-existing condition part of the ACA.

      Or is your concern that you will not be able to afford insurance without ACA subsidies? Does Medicaid help with premiums or Rx costs?

      Don’t panic yet.

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        dwk November 21, 2016 at 7:43 am

        Hey ***insult deleted by moderator*** you cannot keep the pre existing condition without a mandate.
        I realize that is over your head but you can’t buy fire insurance after the house is on fire…..

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          Lester Burnham November 21, 2016 at 8:08 am

          Hey Maus this is name calling.

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          I voted for Trump! November 21, 2016 at 11:20 am

          dwk,
          In the past, insurance companies would sell individuals insurance, but on the plan I had it would not cover pre-existing conditions for 90 days for new policies. I think something like that is reasonable. Might change the 90 days to 30 or 60 days. There was no mandate and insurance was cheap (I was younger then and that helped). I had a catastrophic coverage plan thru BCBS and it was about $20/month. THAT was a deal. However if the government mandates coverage, then BCBS could raise the price to $500 (which they have) and I’d be forced to buy it. With no mandate, the market determines the price.

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 21, 2016 at 12:48 am

      You may conclude I’m hopelessly optimistic, but I don’t see a repeal of Obamacare coming anytime soon. I don’t think an outright repeal would be politically feasible, and if the Republicans had any actual ideas for how to rework it, they’ve been pretty silent about them.

      Everyone seems to be saying they want to keep the pre-existing condition coverage we have now, and that pretty much dictates everything else.

      We’ll see what happens. I’ll fight for healthcare as hard as anyone, but I think it is too early to get your “affairs in order.”

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      Oliver November 21, 2016 at 7:51 am

      Trump,
      “Are you concerned that (you will lose) your access to insurance?….Or is your concern that you will not be able to afford insurance without ACA subsidies”

      The difference between these two realities does not actually exist outside of academic argument.

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    Doug November 21, 2016 at 4:54 am

    The American voter is a ***insult deleted by moderator*** that doesn’t really follow politics or the news or much of anything, the Kardashians maybe. I’m surprised they can find the polling place.

    There’s your explanation! The American voter forgot that Bush failed us on 9/11, got us into dumb wars over nothing, then failed to regulate and wrecked the economy. Seems to me that should disqualify Republicans from the oval office. But no 8 years is up and I guess we let the retarded kids have a turn.

    I just wonder what Trump will fuck up. Given what I’ve seen in the campaign and limited views of the transition it looks like he’ll fuck up everything he touches.

    A wall? Ask the Chinese how that wall turned out.

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      Lester Burnham November 21, 2016 at 8:10 am

      Your attitude towards the “American voter” is exactly why the Democrats got blown out.

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      I voted for Trump! November 21, 2016 at 12:23 pm

      Yes, Bush got us into wars. Well, he didn’t start the wars – they were going on long before he was elected. And it may surprise you to learn that many people don’t think they were started “over nothing”:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qiVBOqNiOs

      You may also be shocked to learn that the war is ongoing and the winner in that war has not yet been determined; and is one of the many reasons DJT won the election.

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    SE November 21, 2016 at 7:32 am

    I voted for Trump!
    Wow! I missed the revelations about false news on FB, and didn’t see any of it because I don’t use FB. I get my news from the internet and radio, and the local newspaper mostly.
    What were some of the “false news” stories?
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    Just how partisan is Facebook’s fake news? We tested it
    Far more spin and fake news is pushed at Trump supporters.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/3142412/windows/just-how-partisan-is-facebooks-fake-news-we-tested-it.html

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    SE November 21, 2016 at 7:36 am

    Doug
    A wall? Ask the Chinese how that wall turned out.
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    The Great Wall of China is not relevant , but yes … it did work well.

    Now gov. Brown needs to build a wall just south of Ashland and make California pay for it 🙂

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      Pete November 21, 2016 at 9:55 am

      Jefferson will build one south of Medford and one north of Davis. Portland and Sacramento will have to split the costs.

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      • Hello, Kitty
        Hello, Kitty November 21, 2016 at 11:28 am

        Now hold on… Canada’s already asking us to kick in for their wall; I don’t know if we can pay paying for more than one at a time.

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    Catie November 21, 2016 at 8:48 am

    I’ve had similar thoughts…where does bike activism fit into this new world? Arent there more important things to spend my time on?

    My copy of Happy City came in after the election. It reminded me that public places and transportation are vital to our happiness, our sense of worth, and the strength of our communities. Residents in cities are more trusting of their neighbors than people who live in the suburbs. Public transit (when done right) can make people feel safe optimistic about the future. If there was ever a time when the city could prioritize the well being of its citizens, isnt that now?

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    SE November 21, 2016 at 10:15 am

    Pete
    Jefferson will build one south of Medford and one north of Davis. Portland and Sacramento will have to split the costs.
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    Good thing Novick’s leaving …. he would just make up some bogus fee and have PDX pay for the whole thing. 🙁

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    • Hello, Kitty
      Hello, Kitty November 21, 2016 at 11:28 am

      A “wall fee”!

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    N November 21, 2016 at 1:45 pm

    Hey Jonathan –

    I would like to see more here about how to actively engage with the city/state/feds – maybe as a monthly or weekly recurring post? BikePortland often posts about policy open houses with a pretty short lead-time, which makes it hard for me to figure out what I want to prioritize (or, honestly, to motivate myself to go – I’m pretty comfy in my routine). I’d love to see a monthly calendar of all open houses/online comment deadlines/etc, with some commentary about the stakes and area of impact.

    If you don’t want to put that on the front page, perhaps a separate section of the website (accessible via the header)?

    I would also really like to see some kind of “activism 101” series – covering different kinds of actions one can take (protest gatherings / ‘official’ online feedback and where/how to leave it (like the city survey you posted a long time ago asking for feedback about Portland’s housing policy) / calling elected politicians / calling non-elected government agencies / emailing same / signing petitions / writing to the papers / facebook/twitter commentary / etc) and what those things are (or aren’t) effective for. It would be great to hear from people on both sides – both activists and the people who receive this feedback, to really get a full-picture idea of what’s possible and what works.

    Right now, I’m in the position where, *if* BikePortland posts something and *if* I have the ability to do it, I do… but I don’t know how to go find this stuff on my own, and I would really like to.

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      Kevin November 22, 2016 at 10:02 am

      Hi! I think this is a swell idea. I also recommend going and listening to the old Bike Portland / Portland Afoot podcasts. They are fun and provide some good insight into being politically active, specifically around bicycle advocacy. In addition to those, the KBOO bike show has some good info. Occasionally the Sprocket Podcast has a show that is more advocacy-oriented. All good listens.

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        Kevin November 22, 2016 at 10:06 am

        Guess I wasn’t logged in. Anyway, I think I’m going to the BTA’s Holiday Party Potluck (https://www.facebook.com/events/542602409279377/). Come and we can talk about grass roots activism.

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          N November 22, 2016 at 12:40 pm

          Alas, as with so many early-evening things, I will be at work. Looks like a fun time, though!

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    X November 23, 2016 at 9:47 pm

    Register as a member of your most convenient political party and go to the precinct meetings. Repeat for eight years.

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    X November 25, 2016 at 10:39 pm

    “still riding after all that” said:”. . .lying pig Hillary. . .”

    Misogyny.

    The window-breakers weren’t out on the street before the election supporting Hillary. They were out on the street after the election burning the flag of a nation that could lawfully produce such a president-elect.

    Let’s play a game: That. . .is a. . .and he’s going to. . .you all.

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