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Tigard, Beaverton, Milwaukie paths get nod for likely state funding

Posted by on June 17th, 2016 at 4:09 pm

Tigard Get Together-1

A BikePortland Get Together in Tigard in 2010. The city’s trail system consistently ranks highly for state grants.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

As we reported Wednesday, Portland’s proposed Flanders Crossing Active Transportation Bridge across Interstate 405 made the cut for probable funding from a two-year, $45 million state program.

On Friday, the state released a full list of 75 project rankings from the final review committee for the lottery-backed Connect Oregon program.

Of those, 37 fit into the top-priority $45 million worth of projects.

Among the tentative winners were three multi-use path segments in the metro area: $700,000 for the Tigard Street Trail in Tigard; $400,000 for Waterhouse Trail Segment 4 in the Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District; and $1.2 million for the Kronberg Park Multi-Use Trail in Milwaukie.

Other bike-related projects from the area didn’t appear to make the cut. Those included trail improvements from Memorial Park to Boones Ferry Park in Wilsonville; a better multimodal crossing of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad tracks at Naito Parkway in northwest Portland; an off-street section of the Red Electric Trail in southwest Portland; Phase IV of the Gresham Fairview Trail; and a Bike Hub at the Mount Hood Villages.

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Various bike-related projects around the state also seemed to score funding, including paths and trail segments in Yamhill County, Redmond and Island City.

Mass transit projects fared relatively well in this round of the program, which now in its sixth two-year cycle. Four of five transit projects around the state made the tentative cut for funding, taking in 15 percent of total costs, the highest ratio to date for transit.

The other categories are aviation, marine/ports and rail.

The Oregon Transportation Commission, the gubernatorially nominated committee that oversees the Oregon Department of Transportation, will hold a public hearing on the funding list July 21 and make final decisions at its Aug. 18-19 meeting in Klamath Falls.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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Lynne
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Lynne

I’m excited about the Yamhelas Westsider Trail!

maccoinnich
Subscriber

Too bad the Naito project didn’t make the cut. The Flanders Bridge is great, but to really succeed it needs to be part of a continuous corridor from the Steel Bridge to the foot of the West Hills. Hopefully the City can find another way to fund it. Here’s the most recent bikeportland story about the proposed solution to the Naito gap:

http://bikeportland.org/2015/12/08/169829-169829

Mike Sanders
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Mike Sanders

The public hearing and the meeting in August might change that, but we’ll have to see. Tri-Met is, according to Willamette Week, looking at a possible MAX line along the 99W corridor to Brudgeport Village, assuming that it passes muster in a region wide election. Could a bike route become part of that project?

rick
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rick

Yes!

nomax
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nomax

Bike paths are a great idea. To fund them I think the state should issue a licence plate and an operator licence for each and every bicycle, sort of like what is done with motor vehicles. Another possibility could be a required liability insurance sold by a govt agency, and also place a tax on all bicycle related sales. Toll bikeways might also be considered as an additional source for funding.
User paying for the bicycle roadways and related items will result in a great feeling of accomplishment for all concerned.

Jack G.
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Jack G.

I’m very happy that the Waterhouse Trail segment made the list. It will really help to solve the poor connection across Hwy 26. It’s still won’t be perfect, but at least it removes the circuitous detour through the neighborhood. I hope that part of the project involves rebuilding the Boardwalk to the new connection. The current one was clearly not built with bikes in mind.

TAJ
Guest
TAJ

Always happy for more infrastructure, but I also find myself using the infrastructure we already have – especially on the Eastside – less. None of this is news to Eastside cyclists, but the camps moved from Cartlandia are now spread thru other areas along the path…very dense from Flavel east, less dense but common along the 205 path, the Peninsula crossing, and on the stretch from Oaks Park to OMSI. A few have moved back West of Flavel. I’ve been riding those paths anyway because it’s better than the road and I haven’t wanted to abandon the paths, but I’m completely done with the 205 path after navigating a group of men camping and hanging out on section hidden by the high concrete wall. Not fun. Not worth it. So I’m riding more on roads and having a harder time getting to some great places to ride…along the Columbia, out toward Mult Falls, etc. And when the choice is getting in a quick post-work ride along heavily camped areas of the path or dealing with rush hour traffic, sometimes I’m just riding less.

Wells
Guest
Wells

Aah with agast, exclamatory enthusiasm, cheerful nods of tears shed, yes,
yes, carry on and THANK YOU you dearest bicyclists imagining our/your/your owns’ future – sans – BURNING carbo hydrates.
Dear Loves, cancel your vacation air space, palm trees poisonings, e t c.

B. Carfree
Guest
B. Carfree

Looking at the list I just want to cry. It’s all about airports (that probably shouldn’t exist), freight rail and oddities with just about nothing of note for the economic future of transportation. Welcome back to 1960.

Jim Labbe
Subscriber
Jim Labbe

I wish the Gresham Fairview Trail Phase IV was in the mix. It would connect the trail to the I-84 Multi-Use path and get one critical step closer to the Marine Drive Trail connection, the fifth and final phase connecting the Springwater and the Marine Drive Trail.

KristenT
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KristenT

Where can we find more information on the trail projects? I know the Tigard Rail Trail has been paved and done for several months now, I’d like to know what else they’re doing… maybe extending it? That would be cool.

Mike Sanders
Guest
Mike Sanders

The Trolley Trail between the Springwater and the end of the Orange Line was built as part of the Orange Line project, so there is a precedent there. Rails alongside trails are becoming increasingly popular back East, so having one as part of the 99W corridor line would make sense.

GlowBoy
Guest
GlowBoy

Wow, some disappointments for sure. The ones I would personally have ranked highest:
– Naito railroad crossing: a major gap in a critical bikeway.
– Red Electric: the lack of a bike route between Portland and Beaverton that is safe and doesn’t require big climbs is a huge embarrassment. You can choose relatively easy climbing on a route that isn’t particularly safe (Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway) or one of several relatively safe but circuitous routes on side streets that involve major climbing. The “#1” bike city in America still can’t provide a reasonable bike route to its largest suburban employment center?