Portland bike parts distributor launches “PDX Lox” brand

New from Cyclone.

Portland might have lost its namesake bike; but there are still plenty of products that owe their inspiration to our great city. Local parts distributor Cyclone Bicycle Supply recently launched a new line of locks under the PDX Lox brand name.

Cyclone’s Inside Sales Manager Matt Case says there are four lock models (two u-locks, two cable locks) under the new label. The locks were developed in partnership with Kryptonite and they come with all the same theft protection warranties that company offers on their own popular line of locks. (Just like Kryptonite locks, Case says, once you’ve registered your bike and lock online, you can file a claim in the event of a theft and get up to $1,000 if your bike gets stolen.)

The PDX Lox u-locks come in two styles, the “Hood” ($32 MSRP) and the smaller “St. Helens” ($30)

Case says the Portland-centric branding is a nod to the city and the Pacific Northwest in general. “It’s where this company has always been,” he says, “and we’re proud to be a part of the bike industry in Portland and proud to be active in the Portland bike community.”

Cyclone sells parts and accessories to hundreds of dealers nationwide, with a big chunk of their business coming from shops in the Portland region. Ask for PDX Lox at your favorite local bike shop and learn more at CycloneBicycle.com.

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Josh
Josh
10 years ago

“Just like Kryptonite locks, Case says, once you’ve registered your bike and lock online, you can file a claim in the event of a theft and get up to $1,000 if your bike gets stolen.)”
I’ve often wondered about this claim and what the details were with it.
Let’s say my bike is worth $1,500. Is Kryptonite/Cyclone saying that they would provide up to $1,000 on top of money that my insurance company would give for replacing my bike or would that simply be $1,000 and bypassing any insurance claim?

Pengo
Pengo
10 years ago
Reply to  Josh

Generally these claims can be pretty tough to collect on as they require you to send the broken lock (as proof of failure), receipts for the lock and the bike and a copy of the police report.This isn’t meant as a criticism of the program (there’s really no other good way to do it) but if the lock’s not left behind then you’re out of luck. They do require you to send proof that you’ve reported the theft to your insurance company, but I don’t know exactly how that figures into the amount they give you.

Nick
Nick
10 years ago

I wonder if the mounting brackets are better? Kryptonite’s have a tendency to break, which can be quite dangerous while riding.

John Lascurettes
10 years ago
Reply to  Nick

Indeed. My Kryptonite mount broke after 1 month of use.

Tom M
Tom M
10 years ago
Reply to  Nick

Honestly the On Guard mount is just as bad or worse. When you’ve come up with a truly good mount you will become the maker of the better mousetrap;)

Amy
Amy
10 years ago

Am I the only one who couldn’t initially figure out what biking had to do with smoked salmon?

9watts
9watts
10 years ago
Reply to  Amy

Or why Yiddish spelling is so aligned with our present penchant for certain letters of the alphabet, and the economy they offer….

wsbob
wsbob
10 years ago

Kryptonite makes different caliber of locks, in terms of deterrence to theft. Where in Kryptonite’s lineup do these Portland/Northwest named models fall? Not talking simply about the warranty, but rather, the difficulty associated with breaking these particular models relative to other locks in Kryptonite’s lineup. Price range suggests these locks rank among Kryptonites lower end models.

Purely on aesthetics alone, it appears kind of drab, but the grey/green color combination might appeal to some buyers over the nicely visible but obnoxious yellow of the Kryptonite NY Fughettaboutit the company used to trade off NYC’s name.

OnTheRoad
OnTheRoad
10 years ago

Know they’re naming them after our mountains, but in other parts of the country, a lock named “The Hood” might lead people to think it’s designed for tougher areas of a city.

GlowBoy
GlowBoy
10 years ago

I’m a function-over-form kind of guy. Are there any Portland-oriented features of these locks, or is this just re-branding products that are already available?

Andyc
Andyc
10 years ago

Ha! Yes. Get a good mount and your’e in business. I broke my Kriptonite mount by tightening it to my frame right out of the package. It was deemed useless, extraneous trash almost immediately.

CaptainKarma
CaptainKarma
10 years ago

I’m not sure having anit-theft devices named after your city is a good thing. And lemmee guess where these “Portland” products are made, certainly not in USA?

Connor
10 years ago

We just started carrying these at The Bike Rack, too early to say but so far no complaints from customers, seems like a solid lock at a good price.

tom
tom
10 years ago

looked OKAY for the price to me, then read “Security rating: 4 out of 10” …that didn’t inspire any confidence.

007
007
10 years ago

the key & lock design is better than the Kryptonite in that the key doesn’t move around while you’re trying to lock the thing. that’s what i liked better about the old u-locks — the round key that would stay in place while you shoved the bar into the U end. this Portland lock fits in my back pocket. love it.

GlowBoy
GlowBoy
10 years ago

007, that appeals to me. To me, the wobbliness of the key in the lock is a significant annoyance with my Evolution Mini.

Glenn
Glenn
8 years ago

If we take out the dams,
but leave the locks,
we will have more salmon,
and can smoke more lox.

Note, I’d want to build out enough wind and solar thermal (sun powered steam) before taking out the hydro for base load. The dams helped win WWII by providing electricity to refine aluminum for aircraft, but they also put an end to cheap and abundant salmon.