Choose a new design for the Burnside Bridge

Screenshot from video rendering of traveling westbound on tied arch design.

With the environmental review process and cross-section finalized, Multnomah County has moved into the design phase of their project to replace the Burnside Bridge.

On Monday, the county released a survey to garner public feedback on which type of bridge they should construct. There are two choices for the eastern end of the span: cable stay and tied arch. (For reference, the cable stay is very similar to the Tilikum Crossing and the tied arch design looks like the Wapato Bridge that connects Highway 30 to Sauvie Island). In addition to bridge types, there are several other design elements that need your input.

Here are the two design options:

And detailed view from the saddle of a bicycle on the new protected lanes:

A new county website goes through all the options and has new visuals that give us a sense of what the new bridge might look like from a cycling and walking perspective. To refresh your memory the 78-foot wide bridge will have 34-feet dedicated to non-drivers. Car users will have two lanes westbound and one lane eastbound. Bus riders will have their own lane in the eastbound direction (and hopefully in the westbound direction someday soon). And bike riders and walkers will share a 17-foot wide space on each side, separated from other traffic by a concrete wall.

In some of the new visuals, they forgot to to include green paint or other delineator markings between the biking and walking areas. But rest assured, it will have bike lane green to help communicate where folks should ride.

The county wants the new bridge to, “provide a welcoming pedestrian space and viewpoint of the Willamette River, encouraging Portlanders and tourists to walk the bridge.”

Check out the new visuals and see what you think. Then be sure to take the survey and share your feedback. If you’re more of a hands-on learner and want to talk to project staff in-person, there will be a special “Breakfast on the Bridge” event July 12th from 7:00 to 9:00 am on the east end of the bridge near 334 NE Couch.

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Founder of BikePortland (in 2005). Father of three. North Portlander. Basketball lover. Car owner and driver. If you have questions or feedback about this site or my work, feel free to contact me at @jonathan_maus on Twitter, via email at maus.jonathan@gmail.com, or phone/text at 503-706-8804. Also, if you read and appreciate this site, please become a supporter.

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ED
ED
19 days ago

I appreciate how much focus is on the design for this bridge! As compared to the monstrous behemoth being forced down our throats for the I-5 bridge to Vancouver!

Nick
Nick
18 days ago

Any updates on connections to the Eastbank Esplanade? IIRC the plans so far indicate that there won’t be one.

Surly Ogre
Joe Bicycles
18 days ago

Take a look at theses videos !!!
https://burnsidebridge.participate.online/tied-arch.html https://burnsidebridge.participate.online/cable-stay.html
the separation in the cabled section is awesome.
I wonder what the separation looks like in the bascule section …

Watts
Watts
17 days ago
Reply to  Joe Bicycles

Both of those videos show some sort of light rail vehicle on the east-side UPRR tracks.

Angus Peters
Angus Peters
16 days ago

Why no mention of costs of the competing designs? Do we have an unlimited budget for this project? Seems like this should be discussed upfront given the heavy burden for local taxpayers here.

Will the last bike commuter turn off their lights
Will the last bike commuter turn off their lights
16 days ago
Reply to  Angus Peters

Do we have an unlimited budget for this project?

Good point, Angus!

The budgetary costs of the negative externalities of automobile are truly enormous and only increasing parabolically.

Our transportation system is BROKE!

It’s time for well-off automobile users to stop sucking at the silicone nipple of big government subsidy and choose less expensive transportation modes!!!

qqq
qqq
16 days ago
Reply to  Angus Peters

From the website:
https://burnsidebridge.participate.online/additional-information.html

Cost and Construction Impacts

A project of this magnitude must consider not only the cost of building the new bridge, but also the long-term costs of maintenance and operation. Construction cost estimates take into account constructability, material availability, right-of-way easements, utility relocation, permitting and environmental mitigations. Impacts on all user groups and surrounding communities during bridge construction are also important. How does the new bridge minimize construction and maintenance costs, minimize impacts and support an efficient construction timeline?

Note: The County has already performed an initial cost, constructability and risk assessment on a wide range of bridge design concept variations. The ones presented in this online open house met the County’s guidelines. This online open house focuses on gathering input from the community on the first two Guiding Principles: Urban/Site Context and User Experience and Visual Character and Aesthetics.