PGE grants will stoke e-bike boom in Portland

Posted by on January 27th, 2021 at 2:45 pm

Yay for more funding of electric bikes!
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

A grant program from Portland General Electric will fund the purchase of electric bikes for two local organizations and help subsidize access to the Biketown bike share system. The PGE Drive Change Fund announced $2.3 million in awards today and among the 12 winners were the Community Cycling Center, the Portland State University Bike Hub, and the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Here’s the official blurb on each award:

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Community Cycling Center, Portland – $50,000
…CCC will use this funding to purchase four e-bicycles that will help expand the reach of programs while also decreasing car travel for internal needs. Initially, the bikes will support a COVID response food pantry delivery by bike program, and in the long term will support educational and community events and outreach and general internal trips between the shops and warehouses. CCC will also use this funding to train their mechanics to maintain the e-bikes, which would also expand their capacity to provide e-bike service to customers.

Portland Bureau of Transportation, Portland – $130,000
… BIKETOWN will grow to 3,000 e-bikes with a larger service area by 2024. BIKETOWN has two equity programs: Adaptive BIKETOWN provides bicycle access for people with disabilities; and BIKETOWN for All provides discounted memberships and fares for people living on low incomes. PBOT will use the PGE Drive Change grant to further reduce financial barriers, providing free ride credits for an average year of BIKETOWN use. The Drive Change funds will also provide discounts for young riders – BIKETOWN recently lowered the minimum rider age to 16 to introduce more teens to the benefits of bike sharing.

Portland State University, Portland – $36,000
The Portland State University (PSU) Bike Hub is a full-service retail bike shop on campus, opened in 2010. The shop offers long term bike rental through its “Vike Bike” program, a fleet of over 140 bikes offered at low cost (or no cost based on need). The program’s existing fleet was assembled by collecting and refurbishing abandoned bikes on campus and made available to students for long-term rentals. PSU will use this funding to purchase 25 Batch Bicycles e-bikes, to supplement the rental fleet and provide greater access to those living further from campus or those with physical barriers to cycling, and serve as a pilot program toward the eventual full replacement of the rental fleet with e-bikes.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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David Hampsten
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David Hampsten

A better more direct link to the award recipient list for 2020/21: https://portlandgeneral.com/news/2021-01-27-pge-drive-change-fund-awards-usd2-3-million-to-local

hamiramani
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Hooray! Good news like this is soothing to the soul in these difficult times. Thank you!

mran1984
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Obviously saddle height is not important when you never pedal. Pathetic.

EEE
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EEE

It’s absolutely important. You want to have the cushiest non-pedaling position possible… get your outstretched leg just right on the pedal-as-a-platform. Pegs might be nicer, but then you don’t meet the legal definition. Maybe get it just right so that you can pedal backwards as you pass the many grumps of the world. Still beats commuting by car to work even if your heart doesn’t get much above 60 bpm the whole way in, though you really do need to layer up given the lack of exercise self-heating!

Hotrodder
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Hotrodder

Dignity seems to be an afterthought, too.

Jason
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Jason

True, class 2 e-bikes don’t require pedaling. Class 1 and 3 are very dependent on pedaling. To the extent that you don’t go anywhere without pedaling. The motor makes you go faster, but it doesn’t make you go. Facts matter.

EEE
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EEE

Has Oregon adopted a classification system used by other states? Last I checked the ORS, you are either an ebike or you are not – no “class” distinctions. Do they market ebikes in Oregon stores using class 1/2/3 etc.? In any event, the differences are trivial from a cost perspective.

Gary B
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Gary B

Surprised you can even see that saddle height, looking so far down your nose.

Jason
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Jason

Forced perspective.

Paul
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Paul

Lots of people are afraid to bike unless they can touch their feet to the ground while seated. I’m sorry you think all those people are pathetic.