Police seek help finding bike burglar caught on video in Montavilla neighborhood

thiefscreengrab

Screenshot from home video shows man kicking down door.
Watch full video below.

On March 11th, Portlander Mitch Lomacz was the victim of a brazen theft. His home security cameras caught a man who walked into the backyard of his Montavilla home, forcibly kicked open the door of his garage and then grabbed a Scott CR1 road bike (retail value about $1,300).

Lomacz, who works at Cyclepath bike shop, now has the attention of Portland Police Bureau detectives who have put out an APB on the suspect. Apparently this isn’t the first time he’s burglarized a home in the neighborhood.

Please keep your eyes out for the bike and the suspect. Lomacz says the suspect is around 5′ 10 ” tall with a medium build and “sporty appearance”, slightly balding and light-colored hair, is a smoker and “definitely knows his way around a bike.” What makes Lomacz think the suspect is a bike guy? “He found a matching pair of pedals on my workbench full of crap/pedals and walked the bike away by the saddle suggesting he rides and handles bikes a lot.”

Watch the suspect at work in the video below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzd_uEuF9Lw

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Here’s another photo of the suspect and the bike that was taken:

image.cfm-2

stolen-scott

Lomacz said he has learned his lesson and plans to make his backyard more secure. “Time to finally build that fence. And a moat. With alligators,” he shared with us via email.

If you have any information you can leave an anonymous tip here.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Founder of BikePortland (in 2005). Father of three. North Portlander. Basketball lover. Car owner and driver. If you have questions or feedback about this site or my work, feel free to contact me at @jonathan_maus on Twitter, via email at maus.jonathan@gmail.com, or phone/text at 503-706-8804. Also, if you read and appreciate this site, please become a supporter.

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Parker
Parker
7 years ago

It’s interesting how the inside b&w camera picks up the pattern on his jacket but the outside one doesn’t- is that because of low rez?

Mitch
Mitch
7 years ago
Reply to  Parker

That is the result of the garage cam being in “night vision” mode using infrared lighting which reflected differently off his poofy jacket which must have been sewn in a square pattern.

Parker
Parker
7 years ago
Reply to  Mitch

Thanks! I’ve been wanting to learn more about cams and finally get a couple.

m
m
7 years ago

My guess is he knows the owner somehow and/or scouted out the place. He goes straight for the one bike like he knew exactly where it was going to be – doesn’t even look at the other one.

Mitch
Mitch
7 years ago
Reply to  m

Definiately don’t know the guy and he is probably the one who cased and robbed us before while we were moving in.

Mick O
Mick O
7 years ago

Is he a smoker or is that a flashlight?

Mitch
Mitch
7 years ago
Reply to  Mick O

That’s a cigarette. I went around to all the local markets/gas stations a few times to see if any of the staff recognized the guy – No dice.

SE
SE
7 years ago

Will keep an eye out for it.

All 5 of my bikes are well locked up at home. Even lock inside the garage.

PNP
7 years ago

This makes me rethink my bike storage. I hope this bike is found soon.

Todd Boulanger
Todd Boulanger
7 years ago

Sorry Mitch at your loss – hope for a speedy recovery of your bike and swift justice.

Todd Boulanger
Todd Boulanger
7 years ago

For the rest of us, some quick lessons here:
1) CCTV cameras (good);
2) Full fence with alligators (in the works) and exotic animal permits;
3) Reinforce all door jambs / add outside hasp / bar window(s) / check how solid walls are;
4) Lock up your bikes in the garage at all time and to something solid/ immovable*;
5) Lock up any tools, flash lights or other items that crooks can use to disable your lock cable or chain, in case they are travelling light;
6) Leave any bike keys in locked key box out of direct sight;
7) Live next to nosey work at home/ retired neighbours;
8) Only have a combo automatic garage door opener (vs. leaving your easy opener on your car visor when cars are parked at home and you are not);
9) Own only one bike and ride it or keep a folder in a vault (unlikely since I cannot own just one bike or ride them all at once – so disregard); and
X) Leave an unlocked bait bike inside for any opportunity / low bike knowledge thief [for times when someone leaves their door open]

*Home Depot now carries commercial grade bike racks (major maker) that are very affordable due to free shipping or ship to store. [Ordering one rack from vendors used to be very spending due to shipping charge for a small number of racks.]

Random
Random
7 years ago

“For the rest of us, some quick lessons here:”

…or, alternatively, move to the suburbs, where this sort of thing is generally less of a problem.

John
John
7 years ago
Reply to  Random

You mean the suburbs with 40mph 5-lane arterial roads, curb tight sidewalks (if any), and maybe a 5′ un-buffered bike lane? No thanks. I’ll take a potential bike thief any day over the inconvenience of auto-dependency and dangerous alternatives to driving.

Todd Boulanger
Todd Boulanger
7 years ago
Reply to  Random

The yard looked pretty suburban…perhaps you were thinking the ‘country’…as in large 100 acre lots. 😉

Mitch
Mitch
7 years ago

I think this guy robbed us a while ago when we first moved in. He definitely knew there were bikes in that garage.

Mark Smith
Mark Smith
7 years ago

The main issue is that one can buy a car policy with a 100 dollar deductible. Feel free to call up state farm and ask them for a 100 deductible on your bike.