The Monday Roundup

Greenspace in inner Portland is
good for our health and our air.
(Photo: Esther Harlow in the
BikePortland.org Flickr Photo Pool.)

Hold on to your seats folks, here’s your Monday Roundup…

  • A Netherlands-based cycling research organization is concerned that bicycles are disappearing from Asia as cities and roads are increasingly planned around cars and motorcycles.

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  • The front page feature story in Sunday’s Oregonian profiles a low-income family who live in a “food desert” — an area in Northeast Portland where there is literally nowhere affordable to buy food unless you own a car. Many families get by shopping at convenience stores which don’t carry produce, or, like this one, taking monthly bus trips to the Winco in Clackamas County.
  • David Goldberg at Worldchanging writes about an Australian professor’s research into the considerable savings municipalities enjoy when they build and plan around people rather than cars.
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Joe
Joe
13 years ago

wild i was just thinking about this on my ride Sunday! yes i tried to get away from the smell.. silly me..

Joe

Dave
13 years ago

There’s a really good article here on copenhagenize.com regarding bike registration fees, environmental issues, road use issues, etc – it’s a really good read I think. They mention that same thing – that traffic itself kills way more people than traffic accidents.

http://www.copenhagenize.com/2008/05/rewarding-cyclists.html

sabernar
sabernar
13 years ago

RE: Food Desert story

Ummm…there’s a Safeway at NE Sandy and NE 69th Ave. That seems like it’s within walking distance from her apartment. It’s about 1.5 miles from her apartment. What’s wrong with that? It seems like they’re making a story out of nothing.

Graham
Graham
13 years ago

That NPR story reads kind of like an obituary. Yet I feel like I might not be the only one who welcomes the day when racking up debt on a credit card in order to buy truckloads of useless crap is no longer considered the pinnacle of patriotism.

Also, I hear these concerns about the failure of the auto industry potentially taking down the whole economy. However, the solution there seems like it should be less about propping up a failing, gluttonous, plague of an industry, and more about decoupling the rest of our economy from that industry’s downward spiral.

Kt
Kt
13 years ago

Sabernar, I think the point of the story was that they were a one-income, low-income family, and had to find the grocery store that gives them the most bang for their buck– and for their food stamps.

I shop at both Safeway and WinCo… and WinCo is where we can get a lot of food for a less amount of money.

Peter K
Peter K
13 years ago

I am a big fan of the Monday Roundup, thanks for making this a regular weekly posting… is it?

sabernar
sabernar
13 years ago

Kt: so what’s the point of the article? That there isn’t a super cheap grocery within walking distance of every single person in this country? I don’t get what they’re trying to say, except to try and make something out of nothing (or very little). Is the point of it that Portland is an expensive place to live? We need more bus routes that go straight to cheap grocery stores?