Bike Parking

Welcome to our bike parking archive page. Browse posts below and click a headline for the full story. If you love bike parking, you might also be interested in our collection of bike parking photos.

Portland Timbers clarify: No season tickets required for bike parking

by on September 28th, 2015 at 3:34 pm

timbers bike parking
Yes, anyone coming to the game
can use the Timbers bike parking.
(Photo: Providence Park)

A Portland Timbers spokesman straightened out misconceptions about the soccer team’s rules for bike parking in an interview Friday.

Last week, a Timbers fan wrote us to report that he and his wife had biked to a game but been told by Providence Park staff that the big temporary bike racks were for Timbers season ticket holders only. He’d then asked several other attendees, who said they had the same impression.

That’s not the case, Timbers Vice President for Communications Chris Metz said Friday.


Years of advocacy leads to bike lockers at affordable housing development

by on September 18th, 2015 at 11:19 am

Velia Mendoza was one of the first users of the new lockers at Hacienda CDC. They were donated by the City of Portland but had sat empty since last year while residents and managers worked out an agreement for how to use them.
(Photo: Jaclyn Hoy for CCC)

After three years of meetings and negotiations, the group of Northeast Portland families who might be the city’s most dogged biking advocacy group got their goal Thursday: somewhere to park their families’ bikes.


With new authority, TriMet moves to clear unused bikes from its racks

by on July 2nd, 2015 at 5:17 pm

bike rack
Should keep things a bit clearer.
(Photo: TriMet)

The Portland area’s public transit agency has given itself the power to seize and discard bicycles abandoned at its stations for more than a few days.

As part of a general code overhaul approved last February and effective Wednesday with the start of TriMet’s fiscal year, the TriMet board of directors approved a new code provision allowing for “a bicycle left on any property of the District Transit System for more than 72 hours may be impounded.”


Comment of the Week: 43 words that perfectly define good bike parking

by on February 6th, 2015 at 4:33 pm

Bike parking at Franklin High School-2
Dear America: It’s not actually that hard.
Just ask Franklin High School.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Good bike parking: it’s not that hard but it’s not that common, at least in North America. Except in Portland, where we really do know how it’s done.

The explanations don’t get any shorter and sweeter than this one from BikePortland reader Jessica Roberts, who shared it beneath our story Tuesday about the city enforcing its bike parking code on a North Portland Home Depot in response to a resident’s complaint. (As we wrote, anybody can report potentially out-of-compliance bike parking in Portland by calling (503) 823-CODE (2633) or using the BDS online form.)

Here’s Roberts’ simple definition, plus a couple examples of rack designs that don’t cut it:


Poorly installed bike racks in renovated Bancorp Tower plaza

by on January 26th, 2015 at 11:15 am

bancorp tower parking
Can you spot the errors with this installation?
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

If we want to become a virtuoso cycling city, we must first master the fundamentals.

It’s one thing when poorly installed bicycle parking happens in front of a convenience store, but it’s a much bigger deal when it’s done as part of a multi-million dollar project for the 2nd tallest building in Portland and the largest office building (in terms of volume) in the entire state of Oregon.

City, district and parent volunteers team up to improve north Portland street

by on January 23rd, 2015 at 11:40 am

Delaware Avenue near Chief Joseph/Ockley Green School in Arbor Lodge is getting a facelift.
(Graphics by Fat Pencil Studio)

There’s probably no better place for a section of carfree street than between an elementary school and a park. That’s the situation on N Delaware Avenue between Bryant and Saratoga in the Arbor Lodge neighborhood.

Bike riders and bikeways loom large in Burnside Bridgehead development boom

by on December 3rd, 2014 at 9:46 am

419 e bunside approach from couch
A 158-unit building proposed at 419 E. Burnside would feature a “bicycle lounge,” possibly with free coffee and video games.
(Images: Myhre Group Architects)

After two decades of waiting for Portland’s bike network to arrive downtown, it looks like downtown is headed for Portland’s bike network.

Now that life on the city’s eastside grid has exploded in popularity (and therefore in expense), major developers are making a lunge across the Burnside Bridge in an effort to bring 9-story living to the east side of the Willamette.

And as construction start dates approach for the first projects of the so-called “Burnside Bridgehead,” the excellent bike access is turning out to be central to their plans.


Lloyd District developers plan for free 12-hour bike valet and on-site bike shop

by on November 17th, 2014 at 10:50 am

It’d be the second permanent bike valet in Portland.
(Rendering: GBD Architects)

The 657-apartment project opening next year in the Lloyd District will include an on-site bike valet that’ll be free to all residents and workers in the area, developers said last week.

Other bike amenities at Hassalo on Eighth, which sits between 7th and 9th Avenues and Multnomah and Holladay streets, will include showers, multiple bike repair stations, a vending machine for replacement bike parts, a bike wash station, a special parking area for cargo or recumbent bikes and a charging station for electric bikes.

It’s the most impressive combination of residential bike-related amenities we’ve yet seen in Portland, probably rivaled only by the Central Eastside Lofts, which last year introduced the city’s first bike wash station and has some other similar features.


Two years after Portland’s auto parking wars, apartment garages aren’t filling up

by on October 23rd, 2014 at 10:39 am

empty lower garage
The Linden apartments at SE 12th and Burnside are 98 percent leased, but 39 of their 110 on-site parking spaces, including the entire lower-level garage, have never been rented. These spaces rent for $110 a month, but street parking is free. (Note the occupied bike rack at the back of the garage.)
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

When Steven Van Zile moved from Los Angeles to the Pearl District last year for a job managing Guardian Management’s portfolio of Portland-area apartment buildings, the low number of parking spaces at some of the newer properties made him nervous.

Linden, the company’s new building on Burnside and 12th, had only 110 parking spaces for 132 units. In an interview at the time, Van Zile expressed gratitude to the building’s developer that the on-site parting lot was larger than at some other buildings. But what would happen if garage space ran short?

It turns out that Van Zile needn’t have worried.


LEED apartment building lacks cargo bike parking, so family rents an auto space

by on October 17th, 2014 at 11:07 am

cargo bike wide angle
The apartment building where the DeLaneys live was designed with lots of parking for small bikes but none for the sort that lets families with children live car-free.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

When their name came up this year on the waiting list for a rare below-market two-bedroom apartment in one of Williams Avenue’s new apartment buildings, the DeLaney family was thrilled.

It had enough room for their growing family — Bijou, their second daughter, is four months old — and was a short walk to the 35 bus that carries Chris DeLaney to his job at the Bike Gallery in Lake Oswego.

But it lacked something else: a place to park the cargo bike that lets them avoid car ownership and thus afford to live where they do. So, after some negotiation, the DeLaneys are paying $40 a month to park their cargo bike in one of the building’s auto parking spaces.