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Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos)

Posted by on June 9th, 2016 at 9:59 pm

Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride 2016-28.jpg
Portland’s annual Pedalpalooza kicked off in fine fashion tonight. The mass of riders strung out on Belmont from SE 12th (where I’m standing to take this photo) all the way onto the Morrison Bridge over the Willamette River.
(Photos J. Maus/BikePortland)

Tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride was the largest in recent memory with hundreds of people (a thousand?) turning out to celebrate the upcoming month of rides, fun and new friends.

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Coming soon: A new protected bike lane on 2nd Ave and a plaza near Voodoo Doughnuts

Posted by on June 9th, 2016 at 5:28 pm

Mock-up of what 2nd Avenue will look like by the end of July.(Images: City of Portland)

Mock-up of what 2nd Avenue will look like by the end of July.
(Images: City of Portland)

The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation will make significant changes to 2nd and 3rd Avenues in downtown Portland this summer.

2nd, which is one-way northbound, will be re-striped with a parking-protected bike lane from SW Stark to NW Everett and there’s a new public plaza coming to the intersection of SW Ankeny and 3rd.

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Over 11,000 people took the ‘Bike More Challenge’ last month

Posted by on June 9th, 2016 at 11:44 am

The team from Daimler Trucks NA.(Photo: B-line Sustainable Urban Delivery)

The team from Daimler Trucks NA.
(Photo: B-line Sustainable Urban Delivery)

The Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA) wrapped up their 19th annual Bike More Challenge with a big party last night in southeast Portland.

This was the first year the friendly competition was held in May instead of September. The BTA made the move to encourage more people to keep biking through the summer, but it looks like the warm and sunny weather also boosted overall participation. A look at the final numbers shows that about 1,000 more participants were coaxed into the event than in previous years.

This year’s Challenge had 11,741 total riders who biked 1,656,098 miles. That’s up from 10,722 riders and 1,247,886 miles in 2015 and 10,350 riders and 1,212,271 miles in 2014.

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Weekly Video Roundup: local bikes, teaching kids to ride, racing, and more

Posted by on June 9th, 2016 at 10:06 am

Welcome to this week’s roundup! The video selection was a little light this weekend until videos flooded in late Tuesday and early Wednesday. One of the last-minute videos is the above from River City Bicycles showing “Portland bikes”. How perfect is that? Dave shows off a Chris King/Cielo and a Mark Dinucci bike. More videos after the break.

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Pedalpalooza starts tomorrow!

Posted by on June 8th, 2016 at 5:00 pm

Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-30
A scene from the 2010 kickoff ride.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

It’s almost here. The largest bike event of its kind on planet Earth is about to start.

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At the Adaptive Bike Clinic, there’s truly a bike for everyone

Posted by on June 8th, 2016 at 3:25 pm

Adaptive Bike Clinic-6.jpg
Adaptive bikes allow people to ditch their walkers and wheelchairs for something a lot more efficient and fun.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

“Demo days” are a common thing in the bike industry. It’s where a company parks their truck and tent at a trailhead and offers free test rides. They bring all the sizes and models so that everyone can try out a bike. But as we’ve learned recently in a robust conversation about access to the city’s bike share program, “everyone” often only includes people who are physically able to ride a common, two-wheeled bicycle.

On Sunday a host of organizations — including the City of Portland — hosted the 12th annual Adaptive Bike Clinic. It was an opportunity for anyone — including people with disabilities — to test ride the bike of their dreams.

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Speak up now for dirt trails at Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

Posted by on June 8th, 2016 at 1:19 pm

Imagine nice biking trails here. It could happen if we speak up.(Photos: Metro)

Imagine nice biking trails here. It could happen if we speak up.
(Photos: Metro)

Imagine rolling your bike onto the MAX, getting off at the end of the Blue Line in Hillsboro, then pedaling 10 miles to some sweet singletrack. That could become reality, but only if you speak up and get involved.

About 23 miles west of Portland — and just 10 miles south of the Hillsboro Transit Center — lies 1,200 acres of undeveloped land called the Chehalem Ridge Nature Park. Before the economy tanked it was prepped for housing, but Metro purchased it in 2010 with funds from their Natural Areas Levy. And we’re lucky they did because it could someday be home to bike trails.

Metro says Chehalem Ridge is one of the largest publicly owned natural areas in Washington County. It’s about the same size as Oxbow Regional Park in east Multnomah County, yet it’s relatively unknown because of its rural location and lack of public facilities. The land itself (based on photos, I have yet to explore it) offers sweeping views of the Tualatin Valley and Coast Range to the west. Its gradual inclines, meadows, and groves of trees give it loads of potential as a place where off-road cycling could flourish.

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ODOT to bicycle riders: Here’s your chip seal cheat sheet

Posted by on June 8th, 2016 at 11:35 am

You might not like chip seal; but at least now you'll know how to avoid it.(Photo: Peckham)

You might not like chip seal; but at least now you’ll know how to avoid it.
(Photo: Peckham Asphalt)

For the first time ever, the Oregon Department of Transportation has published their list of upcoming chip seal projects specifically with bicycle riders in mind.

Chip seal is a type of paving material that mixes asphalt with pieces of fine aggregate (a.k.a. gravel). Road agencies love it because it extends the life of low-volume rural roads and it’s much cheaper to do than repaving. But for people who bike, chip seal is a drag. Literally. The tiny bumps don’t even register while driving, but on a bike they can really slow you down and cause fatigue. (And you do not want to think about what happens when you crash on it.) What makes matters worse is that road crews will often chip seal just the standard lane and then leave a ridge that crosses the fog line and goes into the shoulder people ride.

“My goal is to get the word out so bicyclists can plan accordingly and avoid an unhappy experience.”
— Sheila Lyons, ODOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Program Coordinator

Because of the groans that come with chip sealed roads, we were happy to get an email from Oregon’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Program Coordinator Sheila Lyons last week. She wanted to make sure people know what to expect when planning summer bike adventures on our state’s many excellent backroads. Lyons knows this is an issue, not just because she hears about it from Oregonians, but because she’s a rider herself. “It can be no fun to ride on,” she wrote in the email. “But it’s a cheap and effective surfacing treatment that ODOT is using more and more.”

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Building bike parking shelters at Ockley Green Middle School

Posted by on June 8th, 2016 at 8:54 am

Bike parking shelter at Ockley Green Middle School-6.jpg
Parent volunteers helped erect two bike parking
shelters at a north Portland school on Sunday.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Did you know that you can get a few volunteers together and build a covered bike parking shelter at any Portland Public School?

We wrote about the City of Portland’s school bike shelter program back in 2012. Since then the shelters have popped up at schools all over the city. On Sunday I got the chance to help build one myself at (the newly designated) Ockley Green Middle School in north Portland. It was a fantastic way to create better bike parking at my kids’ school and spend some time with other parents.

In some ways, bike parking shelters do for schools what intersection repair projects do for neighborhoods: The thing you make together is the icing on the community-building cake.

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Bike traffic advisory: Expect delays on bridges due to repairs and Fleet Week

Posted by on June 8th, 2016 at 8:27 am

Bike traffic, Steel Bridge, sunny Saturday-1

The lower deck of the Steel Bridge is always crowded during the warm and sunny summer season — but it’ll be even harder to bike through over the next week.

The Bureau of Transportation has put out a traffic advisory (below) warning of delays on all downtown lift-bridges due to the double-whammy of lifts (as ships depart from Fleet Week festivities) and for electrical repairs on the Steel Bridge. The delays are expected to happen on June 8th, 9th, and 13th.

Be advised and try taking the upper deck for the next few days. If you do ride the upper deck, please ride cautiously when other people are present — it’s narrow up there.

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Centennial event marks a new era for the Historic Columbia River Highway

Posted by on June 7th, 2016 at 4:47 pm

Historic Columbia River Hwy Centennial Celebration-30.jpg
Bicycle riders pose in front of Multnomah Falls Lodge to mark the centennial of the Historic Columbia River Highway. From left to right: Rob Sadowsky, Jessica Horning, Arthur Tetteh, Mychal Tetteh, Patrick Loftus, Carl Larson, AJ “Jerry” Zelada, Scott Poindexter, Greg Baker, Dick Weber, Jerry Smith, Sheila Lyons, Maggie Trout, Dana Canaday, Craig Beebe, Sandra Hikari, Kristin Dahl, April Streeter, Philip Mascher, Marilyn Harlow, Julia Daser, Isabel Daser.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

“While this highway was built for Model-Ts, its future is meant for cyclists, walkers, and hikers…”
— Barbara Roberts, former Oregon Governor

100 years ago today the State of Oregon dedicated the 73-mile Historic Columbia River Highway. It was a marvel of its time, the nation’s first Scenic Highway, and it was known simply as the “King of Roads.” Its 73-miles of curves and sweeping gorge views from Troutdale to The Dalles were an inspiration to engineers and explorers alike.

Then it was all but forgotten in the 1950s when Interstate 84 bullied its way through the gorge. The new interstate cut off sections of the old highway and it fell into disrepair. In 1987 the state legislature established the Historic Columbia River Highway Advisory Committee and work began in earnest to restore the highway to its former glory.

When it was rededicated today at a Centennial Celebration held at Multnomah Falls, there was one major difference this time around: Instead of automobiles marking the future, they now mark the past.

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Gorge Getaways with Laura Foster: Riding the new Trail of the Gods

Posted by on June 7th, 2016 at 9:29 am

Stevenson waterfront from the Trail of the Gods.

Stevenson waterfront from the Trail of the Gods.

We’re excited to share a post written for BikePortland from local author Laura Foster. Foster is the woman behind many excellent guidebooks including her latest — Columbia Gorge Getaways. The post below is adapted from that book.

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Industry Ticker: Kleppinger in at Cyclone, Powell leaves Portland Design Works

Posted by on June 6th, 2016 at 2:02 pm

Uma Kleppinger.(Photo: Cyclone Bicycle)

Uma Kleppinger.
(Photo: Cyclone Bicycle)

One hire and one big change at the top are the latest stories from our local bike industry.

Cyclone Bicycle, a Portland based bike parts and accessory distributor, has hired Üma Kleppinger as its marketing content manager. And Dan Powell, co-founder of Portland Design Works is leaving the company.

Check out the press release below for more details on the Cyclone Bicycle news:

Kleppinger comes to Cyclone with 15 years of content creation and creative services experience, working in numerous markets. She has 6 years of experience in the cycling industry working as a copywriter, branding specialist and marketing consultant. She is a freelance editorial writer for national cycling publications, and has served as Editor-in-Chief on Specialized’s digital magazine, Your Ride, Your Rules.

“I’ve been looking for an opportunity to get on board with a growing bike brand where the diversity of my branding and content experience will directly contribute to that growth,“ said Kleppinger. “Working with big brands is exciting, but I especially enjoy helping to elevate emerging brands.”

Cyclone has enjoyed a growth spurt lately, with the recent acquisition of Action Bicycle USA and signing several new brands.The company has also restructured and expanded its Portland headquarters, underscoring the need to expand the marketing department.

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Burnside bridgehead development will come with new carfree road and raised bike lane on Couch

Posted by on June 6th, 2016 at 1:38 pm

Aerial view of Couch curve and new road under construction.

Aerial view of Couch curve and new road under construction.

The last thing we need on the infamous “Couch Curve” where it enters onto the Burnside Bridge is a new road that adds another layer of auto traffic into the mix. Thankfully that’s not going to happen.

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Good news: Tesla agrees to build Willamette Greenway path segment

Posted by on June 6th, 2016 at 11:59 am

New design drawing showing where the path will go.

Latest plan drawing shows where the new path will go (in blue, existing path is in red).

They didn’t have to do it, but they did.

I’m happy to report that Tesla Motors has decided to pave a new section of the Willamette Greenway path that runs across a parcel they plan to develop in the South Waterfront neighborhood.

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BTA will change name, expand mission to walking, transit and political action

Posted by on June 6th, 2016 at 10:01 am

2013 BTA Alice Awards-17
BTA Executive Director Rob Sadowsky says the changes will usher in a new era of progress.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Change is afoot once again at the Bicycle Transportation Alliance. The Portland-based nonprofit organization announced today that they’ve embarked on a major transition that will result in a new name, a new mission, and a new entity that will allow them to be more engaged in political lobbying.

“This is about building a broad political tent that can move policymakers.”
— Rob Sadowsky, executive director

The organization plans to no longer focus solely on bicycling and will expand their mission to include advocacy for better transit and walking. In addition, the BTA board has voted in favor of creating a 501c4 alongside the 501c3, a move that would give the BTA more tools to influence elections and politics through endorsements, direct political lobbying, phone-banking for candidates, and so on. The 501c4 would also offer memberships to other organizations with aligned missions: like Oregon Walks, the Community Cycling Center, 1000 Friends of Oregon, OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon, and others. After the reorganization is complete the BTA could lead a new political action committee (PAC) that could have wide-ranging impacts on elections and policy measures statewide.

In an interview with BTA leadership last week I learned that this change has been in the works for many years.

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Wonk Night recap: Exciting times for open streets

Posted by on June 3rd, 2016 at 2:44 pm

Wonk Night June 2016-3.jpg
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

If Portland is on the cusp of a new open streets era (and I think it is), it will be up to us to make it great. And by “us” I mean all of us — from city staffers to grassroots activists and everyone in between.

Especially the grassroots.

That’s because the way Portland is doing this is different than other places (surprise, surprise). Our movement is being led by the community and the powers-that-be (the transportation bureau and City Hall) are merely facilitators.

That’s one of the big — and exciting — takeaways from our latest Wonk Night that happened on Wednesday at the Lancaster StreetLab.

With about 40 or so movers-and-shakers in the livable streets movement, we shared insights, traded ideas, and asked important questions about Portland’s open streets past, present, and future.

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Transportation bureau asking Cully neighborhood what safe streets look like

Posted by on June 3rd, 2016 at 12:25 pm

Scene of Ryan Egge collision-13
Is this section of NE Cully Blvd what a safe street
looks like? You won’t know unless you ask.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

There’s a lot of talk about equity in the transportation planning world these days.

Here’s an example of how the City of Portland is handling geographic equity in the roll-out of a major initiative:

Vision Zero is one of the largest efforts the Portland Bureau of Transportation is currently involved in. In fact, along with bike share, Vision Zero is probably the highest priority project for PBOT Director Leah Treat. She is throwing a lot (relatively) of her agency’s capacity and resources toward the planning and policies it will take to make Vision Zero a real thing and not just another buzzword.

Will the Vision Zero campaign be successful in Portland? Will we really eliminate serious injuries and deaths by 2025? That remains to be seen. There’s a long way to go. But so far PBOT is at least talking to the right people. And by that I mean people who don’t have easy access to the central city or City Hall itself. And people who bear an undue amount of those injuries and deaths.

On Monday the city is bringing Vision Zero to the Cully neighborhood in outer northeast Portland. They’re hosting a Safe Streets Fair at the Living Cully Plaza on the corner of NE Killingsworth and Cully. The event welcomes everyone in the community with free food, a Spanish interpreter (and other languages if needed), childcare and prizes.

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The makeover continues: Speed bumps coming SE Clinton

Posted by on June 3rd, 2016 at 10:37 am

Location of new speed bumps coming to Clinton Street.

Location of new speed bumps coming to Clinton Street.


In their ongoing effort to reclaim Southeast Clinton as a low-stress bikeway, the City of Portland will install new speed bumps this weekend.

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After beer-for-biking giveaway, eastside brewer gets new bike parking corral

Posted by on June 3rd, 2016 at 9:24 am

The new bike parking on SE Oak and 9th.(Photo by Eric Iverson)

The new bike parking on SE Oak and 9th.
(Photo by Eric Iverson)

Our bike parking coverage is sponsored by Huntco, a Portland-based maker and seller of bike racks and other industrial furnishings.

Portlanders who bike have granted the wish of a local business.

Base Camp Brewing now has a shiny new on-street bike corral in front of its brewpub on SE Oak and has become the latest example of bikenomics and bike-oriented development in Portland.

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