Black bear spotted near popular cycling routes in Forest Park

There’s a bear out there. (Photos: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Consider this a warning: A black bear is roaming around the northwest hills.

According to Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, they’ve received at least three separate black bear sightings. A public notice released Friday listed NW 53rd, Leif Erikson Road, and Upper Saltzman/Fire Lane 5 as the places where the sightings were made.

“While bears in Forest Park are not unheard of, it is unique to have this many sightings over a short period of time,” said ODFW, who continues to track the case. Apparently the ecology of Forest Park is hospitable to black bears.

KGW reports that there are an estimated 25 to 30 thousand black bears across Oregon: “Officials with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said there have only been five reported black bear sightings in the city of Portland, Forest Park included, in the last three years. With four of those five this month.” 

Portland Parks and Recreation is also posting this caution sign (above) online and at park entrances:

Who remembers in 2015 when someone’s okapi got loose and roamed through the park? I saw it chillin’ up on Leif, but I’ve yet to see the bear.

A 2015 wildlife encounter on Leif Erikson Road.

If you see it, here’s what you should do (according to REI):

Stand your ground; don’t “play dead” with a black bear. Don’t run. Having your bike between you and the bear is still the best idea and can serve as a last line of defense. If the bear approaches, shout, make noise, stand tall, throw small rocks.

If you survive the encounter, please report your sighting to the ODFW Sauvie Island Office (503) 621-3488.

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)

Founder of BikePortland (in 2005). Father of three. North Portlander. Basketball lover. Car owner and driver. If you have questions or feedback about this site or my work, feel free to contact me at @jonathan_maus on Twitter, via email at maus.jonathan@gmail.com, or phone/text at 503-706-8804. Also, if you read and appreciate this site, please become a supporter.

Thanks for reading.

BikePortland has served this community with independent community journalism since 2005. We rely on subscriptions from readers like you to survive. Your financial support is vital in keeping this valuable resource alive and well.

Please subscribe today to strengthen and expand our work.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

11 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Mike Quigley
Mike Quigley
1 year ago

Bears are an increasing occurrence in suburbia. I saw recent reports from Bend and Florence. Also, an uptick in “lost dog” signs on telephone poles.

Michael Mann
1 year ago

Cool.
I’ve had 2 “encounters” with black bears while road riding in Oregon. One was several years ago just outside Silver Falls SP while on the Petal Pedal route, and one was last year in the Blue Mountains while riding the Blue Mountain Century Scenic Bikeway. in both instances the bear crossed the road in front of me and gave no indication of caring about me one way or another. I felt priviledged to have the experience, and while it definitely got my heart rate up, I never felt threatened. Bears really don’t want anything to do with us, but it’s good to know our local forests sustain them.

qqq
qqq
1 year ago

That’s wild that a black bear was spotted. I’d expect a leopard or giraffe to be spotted, but never a bear.

PTB
PTB
1 year ago
Reply to  qqq

Zing!

carrythebanner
1 year ago

Thanks for the heads-up.

Side note — is that an okapi? I didn’t think they had long horns. Oryx, perhaps?

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  carrythebanner

Nice work, scimitar horned oryx to be specific.

Atreus
Atreus
1 year ago

Pack that bear spray!

Jeff S
Jeff S
1 year ago

A few years back we inadvertently treed a small bear or cub while riding in the Siuslaw west of Eugene. Stood there and marveled at the wonder of it, until it occurred to us that it would be advisable to move along, as a protective mama bear might be about…

Daniel Fuller
Daniel Fuller
1 year ago

A recent paper in PLoS One says “black bears are primed to thrive in the urban-wildland interface, as rural and suburban development creates more edge habitat”. Forest Park is in many ways an ideal environment for black bears, being a second-growth forest close to human food sources (trash, compost, bird feed, etc.) and with plenty of non-native blackberries. Expect more bear sightings in the future as the exurbs expand and force native wildlife species to adapt.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9707782/

Pwitty
Pwitty
1 year ago

They just clear cut the forest to the north. Black bears suddenly appear in Forest park. Hmmm.

Phil Brandt
Phil Brandt
1 year ago

If you survive the encounter, please report your sighting to the ODFW Sauvie Island Office.” If not, bon appétit to the bear!