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The Monday Roundup: ‘Doughnut city’, unhinged cops, B2V, and more

Posted by on January 25th, 2021 at 10:54 am

Welcome to the week. Before we get to work, let’s make sure we are informed of the most notable news from the past seven days.

Here’s what you need to know today…

Traffic enforcement reform now!: A new investigation from NPR found that over 25% of fatal police shootings of unarmed Black people occurred during traffic stops.

Bike touring in the time of Covid: The BBC covered a UK man’s attempt at a global bike tour during a global pandemic.

CW: Police officer runs over people: A horrible scene unfolded in Tacoma (WA) Saturday night as a police officer in an SUV intentionally ran over a large group of people who had stopped traffic in an intersection to do burnouts and hang out.

Bikability metric: We love how this story about planning for bicycling around transit stations in Seattle includes a “Level of traffic stress” metric.

“Doughnut city”: Forget the “15-minute neighborhood” or “20-minute city”, Amsterdam is doing something much more bold that transcends bicycling and urban planning and gets to the heart of economic justice by questioning capitalism.

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SUVs ruin everything: The welcome reduction in emissions from car users due to the pandemic was completely wiped out because of increased sales of big, gas-guzzling, emissions-spewing, people-killing, community-destroying SUVs.

Latest from Paris: Seems like each week we have amazing news to share from Paris. The latest? more active transportation representation at the US DOT.

Federal bearings: Curious about the potential and inner-workings of the US DOT now that we have the most promising Transportation Secretary in a generation and a Democrat in the White House? Check this podcast featuring the wonderful Beth Osborne from Transportation for America.

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Money money money: Advocates in Washington are eager to push for a $26 billion statewide transportation funding package introduced by Democrats that would invest “over $80 million for every 2-year state budget in active transportation grants alone.”

B2V: In a bid to make roads safer for cycling, industry bigwigs Trek, Specialized, Shimano and SRAM are part of a partnership (that includes Ford) to create a new “Bicycle to Vehicle” (B2V) communication technology standard.

E-bike exemption: A bill in the Washington legislature proposed by a Democrat from Bellingham would exempt electric bikes and up to $200 in bike accessories from the state sales tax.

Got bikes? A coalition of bike companies in the UK have joined together to form a “marketing board” (similar to the “Got milk?” campaign) that will focus on catchy campaigns to boost bicycling awareness and ridership.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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Hello, Kitty
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Hello, Kitty

To put that 25% number into context, it would be helpful to know what proportion of police contacts with unarmed black people are traffic stops. Are traffic stops disproportionately deadly compared to other interactions? If so, why? What can we do to make those contacts safer?

damiene
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damiene

From the doughnut city article (which I thought was Basingstoke, UK, on account of all the damned roundabouts):

In the U.S., Portland, Ore., is preparing to roll out its own version of the doughnut, and Austin may be close behind.

What? We are? Where/how/etc?

RudiV
Guest
RudiV

Regarding B2V. Great, not getting run over by a “smart” car is now YOUR responsibility. You thought helmet scolds were annoying? Wait til this comes online.

squareman
Subscriber

I am so very weary of the push for B2V technology. It’s just a huge potential to pass the blame from drivers onto everyone else using the roadway. We already hear in the vast majority of police reports, even when the driver is at fault, that a pedestrian or bicycle rider was not wearing bright clothing, or was not carrying a light, etc. Now, carheads will have another scapegoat excuse for their driving habits to push blame onto anyone but them.

That said, it would be nice to have additional safety measures. Still, I’d hate for all old bicycles to suddenly become street-illegal because of “missing safety equipment” in the form of electronics that will only drive up the price of bikes for everyone.

David Hampsten
Guest
David Hampsten

Latest from Paris: Page Not Found. Broken link?

soren
Guest
soren

It is darkly comical that the ‘merkin media piece failed to mention that the entire impetus for the “doughnut model” was the observation that ~60% of Amsterdam’s emissions come from consumption of things produced elsewhere*. Portland’s C40 analyses also found that the bulk of Portland’s emissions come from imported consumption (~70%) and that these emissions complete obliterate small decreases in production-based emissions. (Ironically, the C40 consumption metric was greenwashed out of PDX’s most recent report.)

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/08/amsterdam-doughnut-model-mend-post-coronavirus-economy

The consensus climate science view is that Portland, and other cities like it, are primarily consumers of CO2e pollution. Therefore,

the claim that Portland has cut its emissions since 1990 is a lie

(that enables affluent people to continue to consume with abandon). Likewise, the claim that transportation makes up 40% of Portland’s emissions is also a distortion.

Portland’s government (and many activists”) are guilty of what Greta Thunberg calls “creative accounting”:

“Since 1990 the UK has achieved a 37% reduction of its territorial CO2 emissions…But these numbers do not include emissions from aviation, shipping and those associated with imports and exports. If these numbers are included the reduction is around 10% since 1990 – or an an average of 0.4% a year, according to Tyndall Manchester.”

–Thunberg to MPs 2019

“…politicians are making it look like real action is happening, when in fact almost nothing is being done, apart from clever accounting and creative PR.”

–Thunberg at COP25

*and replaced it with some vague incomprehensible clickbait

Peter W
Guest
Peter W

The B2V thing is interesting, but it broadcasts your GPS and velocity (so you can be plotted on an in-car nav system).

Potential downside: cops will know exactly how fast you were riding down that hill, because you just broadcast it to them.

Christian Samuel
Guest
Christian Samuel

Jonathan,
Cop in Tacoma was not “unhinged” as mentioned in your tabloid worthy headline. He was acting in self defense, protecting himself from a threatening mob.

https://mynorthwest.com/2499586/rantz-mob-surrounded-threatened-safety-of-tacoma-cop-who-drove-out-of-crowd/

Jason
Guest
Jason

“Bicycle to vehicle communication.” The phrase perpetuates something.