Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

PBOT releases locations of first 100 temporary ‘Slow Streets’ barricades

Posted by on May 1st, 2020 at 4:57 pm

Red dots are where barricades will go. View map here.

PBOT has kept their promise: They just shared a map of the first 100 locations that will receive new temporary barricades to restrict driving in the name of their ‘Slow Streets Safe Streets‘ initiative.

The first barricade installation will be this coming Thursday (May 7th) and new signs will be up shortly thereafter. The design of the signs and the expected intersection treatments were also just released.

Advertisement

Here’s the official verbage from PBOT about the locations and treatments:

The first step of this initiative focuses on neighborhood greenways — PBOT is installing temporary barricades to either close certain streets to all but local traffic or to slow traffic where a full closure is not feasible. The bureau will also install signage to alert drivers to the presence and priority of people walking and biking on the greenways.

PBOT has identified a first set of 100 neighborhood greenway sections that we will put treatments next week (starting May 7th, 2020) — these are locations where greenways intersect with busy streets and have historic high traffic volumes.

Note: the dots on the map indicate where a location will be treated with temporary barricades and signage. Additional signage will be placed throughout the neighborhood greenway network.

Here’s the geographic breakdown:
— North Portland: 10 locations
— Northeast Portland: 31 locations
— Southwest Portland: 9 locations
— Southeast Portland: 44 locations
— Northwest Portland: 9 locations

You can view the exact intersections in this spreadsheet we’ve uploaded to Google Drive.

And here’s what the official signage will look like:

Interesting how they’ve made the feedback line so prominent. That’s a great idea.

Advertisement

PBOT has also shared the plan drawings of how the signs and barricades will be installed:

Outreach on this initiative has yet to begin. PBOT says digital meetings will be held “in the coming weeks”. For now they’re accepting suggestions for locations where, “street improvements could support safe physical distancing.” If you want to submit an idea, call 503-823-SAFE or email: active.transportation@portlandoregon.gov.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
— Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
— Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

57
Leave a Reply

avatar
19 Comment threads
38 Thread replies
1 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
36 Comment authors
ChrisSJRain WatersSERiderDavid Hampsten Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Anne Hawley
Subscriber
Anne Hawley

I’m actually pretty impressed with this. Pleasantly surprised.

mark
Guest
mark

So these are just advisory signs, not actual diverters?

matchupancakes
Subscriber
matchupancakes

I could cry looking at the omission of lower SE Portland (as well as SW Portland).

It’s a good start. Let’s hope more is on the way soon.

Doug Busack
Guest
Doug Busack

This is a good start! Bummed to see that 7th didn’t get much love except for right near Irving Park. I would be willing to take that rougher climb to avoid more people on Williams. I rode out to Rocky Butte today from Peninsula Park, and found an awful lot of drivers on sharrowed roads (Holman, Fremont past Sandy, etc.). Pedestrians walking in the road (which I know is good), but they would dart left in front of me as I tried passing, lol. Trying the tolerance approach, and I’m grateful we’re doing something!

Kana O.
Guest
Kana O.

If the goal of this initiative is equitable provision of safe space for physical distancing, this first step is a misstep. By committing to only the 100 spots on greenways for the first move on this initiative, Chloe already started on the wrong foot; there are entire swaths of town that don’t have greenways. The error is compounded by not significantly upping the density of treatments in those areas where the network is scant.

PBOT mentioned earlier this week that traffic volumes on some key existing greenways are waaaay down—well within the ranges they target. Why focus first on a network that is already low volume and has existing treatments in place to control volumes? A focus that so clearly leaves some of our most vulnerable community members behind. What about providing space in places where there isn’t already at least a suggestion that cars are guests and pedestrians belong?

Ben Hubbird
Guest
Ben Hubbird

Wow, North and Northeast kinda got the short end of the stick here, huh? Maybe it’s just my personal habits, but I’ve long considered Tillamook & Going to be two of the main East/West greenways, and neither are getting meaningful love here? In SE it looks like Lincoln/Harrison got the shaft, but there are already diverters a couple places there.

Stephen A Scarich
Guest
Stephen A Scarich

Over here in Bend, the Safer Streets have been implemented, but in a pretty ‘wimpy’ fashion. Big 6′ highway signs were put up a couple of weeks ago saying No Through Traffic . They worked for awhile, but now I notice drivers are just ignoring them and traffic is back to normal. Tiny, like 8″ signs were put on the roundabouts, but way too small for a driver to read. On top of that, former good cycling streets, like 4th Ave have been screwed up with supposedly pedestrian-oriented corner push-outs that block former cycling lanes, as well as forcing right-hand drivers to make very dangerous turns that take them into oncoming lane. I actually saw cars swerving to miss each other yesterday. one step forward, two steps back.

tee
Guest
tee

Disappointing because this ignores pretty much all of Woodstock/Mt Scott-Arleta, and Brentwood-Darlington. These areas lack greenways and have pretty lame bike infrastructure, but there’s nothing meaningful for residents of these 3 areas in this plan.

Nathan Hinkle
Guest
Nathan Hinkle

I used open data from Portland Maps to figure out where the existing permanent diverters are, and mapped the temporary diverters, permanent diverters, and added in planned and recommended greenways in addition to the already built greenway network, and put it all on one map: https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=fd9db7ccb2a0478590221aa15d697fc7

The existing diverters definitely make some of the greenways look better, but adding in all of the planned and recommended greenway routes which haven’t been built really highlights the gaps in the current network.

Please feel free to share the link, I think it helps to show the bigger picture.

chris
Guest
chris

So ALL 2 wheeled, vulnerable, slow moving road users are allowed on the greenways, right?

My recycled, reused, 100mpg motorbike tops out at 30 mph and I would get run off the road trying to take the lane on Powell, or even Foster with its reduced speed limit. I’ve already been in 2 car vs bike wrecks, (with the driver not even stopping the second time) when I use main roads so I try to take the side streets as much as possible.

Yes, I’m well aware that most of you hate anything with a motor, but I really can’t afford a $3500 e-bike so I’m pretty content with my $300 motor+pedals bike.

Gil Johnson
Guest

So does this map include the obstructions already in place? I see two red dots at the west end of Clinton St. There already is one barricade on about 17th and another at 32nd. The two red dots on the west end of the street look to be at 26th and 21st, which seems like overkill for one half mile of street.

Dick Pilz
Guest
Dick Pilz

I’m curious about the SE Lincoln and 60th intersection. How is TriMet negotiating that diverter? A, B, or C style? SE Division and 60th are too sharp for the Southbound buses.

Jesse
Guest
Jesse

Ben Hubbird
Wow, North and Northeast kinda got the short end of the stick here, huh?

matchupancakes
I could cry looking at the omission of lower SE Portland (as well as SW Portland).

Well, sounds like it’s all sorted.

Mick O
Guest
Mick O

Interesting to me that the sign shows a cyclist wearing a mask.

q
Guest
q

One thing I’ve heard, but don’t know if it’s true, is that Portland Public Schools has closed off several fields/open spaces to people. I understand there could be some justification to that if true–need to close sports fields to avoid people playing group sports, etc. But it seems inefficient to have PPS removing areas that lots of recreation seekers (walkers, joggers, kids biking or playing) would like (or prefer) while those same people are adding to the demand for street and sidewalk space, placing a greater burden on PBOT.

The Real Fred
Guest
The Real Fred

I guess the most shocking thing to me about this map is that it has made me realize just how awful slash nonexistent the greenways network is in SW Portland. I’ve seen the markings on the pavement but never paid much attention. We have a grand total of one steep-ish and very bumpy street between Terwillger and Hillsdale, and some neighborhood streets in Maplewood that don’t really go anywhere.

Clearly the greenways network is really for the bike-telligensia east of the river. Good on ya for getting yourselves some space to ride, but it’s not happening west of the river.

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

My in-laws live off Palatine St in SW and there isn’t any nearby streets worthy of bike greenways. The terrain is just too steep and it’s too much of a “suburb”.

SJ
Guest
SJ

So I can effectively calm traffic on say, SE 103rd and Harold, with a couple of saw horses and orange barrels? $100 doesn’t sound too bad when I can mitigate the speeding, failures to stop and the noise.

Chris
Guest
Chris

Yesterday, 5/17, SE 48th was ‘closed’ by a repurposed PBOT barricade and a trash can. It looked like the residents were having a street party. No permits were evident. NB traffic on 48th had to turn right on Alder.

I’ve written a complaint to the city, but doubt anything will come of it.

This is why we can’t have nice things.