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PBOT releases locations of first 100 temporary ‘Slow Streets’ barricades

Posted by on May 1st, 2020 at 4:57 pm

Red dots are where barricades will go. View map here.

PBOT has kept their promise: They just shared a map of the first 100 locations that will receive new temporary barricades to restrict driving in the name of their ‘Slow Streets Safe Streets‘ initiative.

The first barricade installation will be this coming Thursday (May 7th) and new signs will be up shortly thereafter. The design of the signs and the expected intersection treatments were also just released.

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Here’s the official verbage from PBOT about the locations and treatments:

The first step of this initiative focuses on neighborhood greenways — PBOT is installing temporary barricades to either close certain streets to all but local traffic or to slow traffic where a full closure is not feasible. The bureau will also install signage to alert drivers to the presence and priority of people walking and biking on the greenways.

PBOT has identified a first set of 100 neighborhood greenway sections that we will put treatments next week (starting May 7th, 2020) — these are locations where greenways intersect with busy streets and have historic high traffic volumes.

Note: the dots on the map indicate where a location will be treated with temporary barricades and signage. Additional signage will be placed throughout the neighborhood greenway network.

Here’s the geographic breakdown:
— North Portland: 10 locations
— Northeast Portland: 31 locations
— Southwest Portland: 9 locations
— Southeast Portland: 44 locations
— Northwest Portland: 9 locations

You can view the exact intersections in this spreadsheet we’ve uploaded to Google Drive.

And here’s what the official signage will look like:

Interesting how they’ve made the feedback line so prominent. That’s a great idea.

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PBOT has also shared the plan drawings of how the signs and barricades will be installed:

Outreach on this initiative has yet to begin. PBOT says digital meetings will be held “in the coming weeks”. For now they’re accepting suggestions for locations where, “street improvements could support safe physical distancing.” If you want to submit an idea, call 503-823-SAFE or email: active.transportation@portlandoregon.gov.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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Anne Hawley
Subscriber
Anne Hawley

I’m actually pretty impressed with this. Pleasantly surprised.

9watts
Subscriber

Anne Hawley!
We missed you! Welcome back!

mark
Guest
mark

So these are just advisory signs, not actual diverters?

Momo
Guest
Momo

Actual diverters are pretty complicated, because they affect business access, emergency response, driveway access, all kinds of things. Sometimes a median diverter is better, sometimes a semi-diverter, sometimes a full or diagonal diverter. They have to be thought through and designed. You can’t just throw down 100 of them overnight. So it makes sense that these would be advisory only. You can technically drive around them if you have to, but you’re not “supposed” to. It’s aiming at a culture change, a reminder to be extra careful if you have to drive on that street, and to avoid driving on it at all if you’re not heading to a local destination.

Fred
Guest
Fred

Thoughts AND prayers!

matchupancakes
Subscriber
matchupancakes

I could cry looking at the omission of lower SE Portland (as well as SW Portland).

It’s a good start. Let’s hope more is on the way soon.

Josh
Guest
Josh

Agreed, this really underscores the existing gaps in the network. My neighborhood (Brooklyn) won’t see any changes because we have zero existing greenway miles.

chasing backon
Guest
chasing backon

I totally agree. Hardly anything south of Holgate which is such a huge area for transportation and recreational cycling

David Hampsten
Guest

This is phase 1, the easy stuff. I’m guessing that phase 2 will have the arterial buffers, especially in SW and East Portland, given the diagrams that PBOT has already put out.

Fred
Guest
Fred

It’s PBOT so of course the outer east side gets ignored again. Why did we expect anything different?

Wylie
Guest
Wylie

I agree and I think there is no reason to say “this is enough” because that only gives them more excuses to slow roll a fix which should be ubiquitous all over the city. Good work peeps, but not enough, not nearly enough

SERider
Guest
SERider

Same as it ever was. This area of SE Portland often gets the short end of the stick (And they more often pay a higher rate of property taxes too!)

Doug Busack
Guest
Doug Busack

This is a good start! Bummed to see that 7th didn’t get much love except for right near Irving Park. I would be willing to take that rougher climb to avoid more people on Williams. I rode out to Rocky Butte today from Peninsula Park, and found an awful lot of drivers on sharrowed roads (Holman, Fremont past Sandy, etc.). Pedestrians walking in the road (which I know is good), but they would dart left in front of me as I tried passing, lol. Trying the tolerance approach, and I’m grateful we’re doing something!

Kana O.
Guest
Kana O.

If the goal of this initiative is equitable provision of safe space for physical distancing, this first step is a misstep. By committing to only the 100 spots on greenways for the first move on this initiative, Chloe already started on the wrong foot; there are entire swaths of town that don’t have greenways. The error is compounded by not significantly upping the density of treatments in those areas where the network is scant.

PBOT mentioned earlier this week that traffic volumes on some key existing greenways are waaaay down—well within the ranges they target. Why focus first on a network that is already low volume and has existing treatments in place to control volumes? A focus that so clearly leaves some of our most vulnerable community members behind. What about providing space in places where there isn’t already at least a suggestion that cars are guests and pedestrians belong?

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

Kana O.
Guest
Kana O.

You’re right in that no matter how she responded, someone was going to grumble.

But this implementation is an unforced error. Anyone who has lived in Portland as long as she and been ensconced in the heights of city politics for a couple years knows (viscerally and intellectually) the investment story of east Portland. And it can easily be seen that doubling down on that existing inequitably drawn and reinforced network will exacerbate the disparities we all know of.

This is elementary.

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

We definitely live in two very different Portland’s: one west of 82nd and the other east of.

David Hampsten
Guest

Why not unite the various parts of Portland by creating a central east-west pedestrianway?

From ideas I got while traveling in Europe, I’d start with the Thorburn Expressway from West Burnside at 23rd to SE Stark at 162nd. Create a continuous and permanent Open Streets motif. Use the same tools you would for blocking neighborhood streets to block signalized intersections – force local residents to use side streets to get to their destinations, not unlike what bicyclists must currently do to get to main street destinations. Make the street speed limit 20 kph (about 13 mph) so that cars, buses, and trucks are “guests” on the street, sharing it with pedestrians and other users. Allow and encourage local restaurants to expand seating into the street to allow and encourage social distancing of patrons and staff in commercial areas, especially in Uptown, downtown, Kerns, Montevilla, Hazelwood, and Rosewood. In residential areas, encourage street art and pocket parks. In East Portland, Stark has a lot of the poorest people in large apartment complexes, so the street would simply be an extension of their apartment complex entry, but with a lot more amenities such as parks, seating and green spaces. Bus #20 already serves the whole route, so it could be converted into a DC-type circulator of a $1 fare and much reduced speeds. There’s no reason the street traffic-path would need to be straight anywhere, not at 13 mph. Emergency vehicles could still get through, but they’d have to move much slower and navigate more carefully.

Wylie
Guest
Wylie

No, they are just at the damned if you don’t phase. I’m putting half-measures under “didn’t” for now

Wylie
Guest
Wylie

Ok now do the other side of the river?

Ben F
Guest
Ben F

I biked most of the Lincoln St. greenway yesterday (downtown to Montavilla – where I work as a caregiver) and the car traffic honestly felt surprisingly heavy. Bike traffic also felt way higher than normal, and at times it almost felt like Sunday Parkways – except with a few random inpatient drivers. Now, I’m not wanting to complain – Lincoln is much better now than it used to be since they added the latest diverters. I just wanted to point out that car traffic appears to be picking back up again.

Sidenote: my favorite part of the route was the section of Harrison through Mt. Tabor park, which is completely closed to cars. It would be cool if that could remain permanent.

Ben F
Guest
Ben F

I agree with you, though, that the implementation of this should start with areas of Portland that already have less infrastructure!

Fred
Guest
Fred

Agreed, I’ve lived in the area for almost 7 years and often take Harrison through Tabor on my commute. It’s become increasingly popular for “cut through” drivers recently. I too wish they’d close it down permanently.

Gary B
Guest
Gary B

“Why focus first on a network that is already low volume and has existing treatments in place to control volumes? ”
Because it’s the easiest thing to do and thus can be done very quickly. Do you think it’d be better to spend a month rolling out a better project, or knock out some low hanging fruit in 1 week then move on to the harder stuff?

I think the latter makes sense. And I’m in North Portland, where we are getting all of 6 “diverters,” compared to about 17 east of 82nd (by my quick counts).

Ben Hubbird
Guest
Ben Hubbird

Wow, North and Northeast kinda got the short end of the stick here, huh? Maybe it’s just my personal habits, but I’ve long considered Tillamook & Going to be two of the main East/West greenways, and neither are getting meaningful love here? In SE it looks like Lincoln/Harrison got the shaft, but there are already diverters a couple places there.

Matt
Guest
Matt

There is ONE diverter in the rectangle of I-5, I-84, the Columbia, and NE 33rd. I don’t understand why these can’t be peppered through neighborhoods all over Portland, regardless of whether they have greenways. There are arterials within a few blocks of pretty much any Portland address. Driving off of arterials should be really annoying for more than those few blocks.

Matt
Guest
Matt

Sorry I should have said MLK as the west boundary. There are actually a whopping 3 if you go to I-5.

Timee
Guest
Timee

It actually looks like northeast and north got the most attention.

Stephen A Scarich
Guest
Stephen A Scarich

Over here in Bend, the Safer Streets have been implemented, but in a pretty ‘wimpy’ fashion. Big 6′ highway signs were put up a couple of weeks ago saying No Through Traffic . They worked for awhile, but now I notice drivers are just ignoring them and traffic is back to normal. Tiny, like 8″ signs were put on the roundabouts, but way too small for a driver to read. On top of that, former good cycling streets, like 4th Ave have been screwed up with supposedly pedestrian-oriented corner push-outs that block former cycling lanes, as well as forcing right-hand drivers to make very dangerous turns that take them into oncoming lane. I actually saw cars swerving to miss each other yesterday. one step forward, two steps back.

tee
Guest
tee

Disappointing because this ignores pretty much all of Woodstock/Mt Scott-Arleta, and Brentwood-Darlington. These areas lack greenways and have pretty lame bike infrastructure, but there’s nothing meaningful for residents of these 3 areas in this plan.

ChadwickF
Guest
ChadwickF

Yeah, I’m super bummed about this, too. Hopefully we can expand and build out our greenways because of the dire need for them now.

Nathan Hinkle
Guest
Nathan Hinkle

I used open data from Portland Maps to figure out where the existing permanent diverters are, and mapped the temporary diverters, permanent diverters, and added in planned and recommended greenways in addition to the already built greenway network, and put it all on one map: https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=fd9db7ccb2a0478590221aa15d697fc7

The existing diverters definitely make some of the greenways look better, but adding in all of the planned and recommended greenway routes which haven’t been built really highlights the gaps in the current network.

Please feel free to share the link, I think it helps to show the bigger picture.

David Hampsten
Guest

Great map!

I’m more familiar with East Portland and connections towards downtown, so I’ll address those:
– There’s a bike bridge over 205 at Lents Elementary that connects two green lines on your map north of Foster. I note the Failing bridge in also missing. Maybe add a bridge symbol?
– There are bike paths in the city Ed Benedict park at the west end of SE Bush connecting the north-south route.
– City and ODOT bike lanes are all missing on your map, particularly those on Burnside between 68th and the city line, but also on Powell, Division, etc. East Portland has a lot more bike lanes than inner portland, a legacy of Multnomah County planning.
– The Multi-use paths are all missing (Springwater, 205, 84, etc.)
– Some of the ‘recommended’ routes you have are good only if you are a fearless MAMIL rider willing to ride on a collector without a shoulder. Folks 8 to 80 would likely avoid the sections of Main east of 162nd, 148th north of I-84, and Fargo between 102nd and 122nd (an off-ramp for I-84, believe it or not).

Nathan Hinkle
Guest
Nathan Hinkle

Thanks David! I’m using the data provided by PBOT’s open data via portlandmaps. I chose to focus the map on existing and *planned* greenway routes specifically, and excluded the MUP and bike lane layers, because the original PBOT map showed greenways and this effort is mostly focused on greenways and similar streets at the moment. However, if you want to see the full network, I provided an option for that, it’s just off by default. If you click the “content” tab on the left sidebar of the map page, you can toggle on “full active bicycle network” and toggle off “combined bicycle network” to see all active (excludes planned/proposed routes) bikeways, color coded by infrastructure type. This includes all MUPs and bike lanes in PBOT’s data.

David Hampsten
Guest

Odd. When I turn on all the layers, the 4M is missing (SE Market, Mill, Millmain, & Main, 92nd to 174th).

Nathan Hinkle
Guest
Nathan Hinkle

I only included greenways on the “combined bicycle network” layer which has “planned” routes, and only included “active/built” segments on the “full active bicycle network” layer which has non-greenways. If you enable the “Bicycle Network” layer which is the full raw data from PBOT and zoom in far enough you’ll see all those sections you mention, but that layer with full detail doesn’t render completely when zoomed out beyond a mile or so because there’s too much data. I created the two layers above by reprocessing it into contiguous segments so it could show better, but I had to be selective about which data to include because it takes a long time to run and costs ArcGIS credits. It looks like I accidentally had that layer filtered to only active, but I’ve removed that filter.

chris
Guest
chris

So ALL 2 wheeled, vulnerable, slow moving road users are allowed on the greenways, right?

My recycled, reused, 100mpg motorbike tops out at 30 mph and I would get run off the road trying to take the lane on Powell, or even Foster with its reduced speed limit. I’ve already been in 2 car vs bike wrecks, (with the driver not even stopping the second time) when I use main roads so I try to take the side streets as much as possible.

Yes, I’m well aware that most of you hate anything with a motor, but I really can’t afford a $3500 e-bike so I’m pretty content with my $300 motor+pedals bike.

Gil Johnson
Guest

So does this map include the obstructions already in place? I see two red dots at the west end of Clinton St. There already is one barricade on about 17th and another at 32nd. The two red dots on the west end of the street look to be at 26th and 21st, which seems like overkill for one half mile of street.

Nathan Hinkle
Guest
Nathan Hinkle

It does not, but I created a version of the map which does: https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=fd9db7ccb2a0478590221aa15d697fc7

Clinton doesn’t have diverters at 21st and 28th, and that stretch specifically gets a LOT of cut-through car traffic, so I think it’s a very sensible place for them.

Dick Pilz
Guest
Dick Pilz

I’m curious about the SE Lincoln and 60th intersection. How is TriMet negotiating that diverter? A, B, or C style? SE Division and 60th are too sharp for the Southbound buses.

Jesse
Guest
Jesse

Ben Hubbird
Wow, North and Northeast kinda got the short end of the stick here, huh?

matchupancakes
I could cry looking at the omission of lower SE Portland (as well as SW Portland).

Well, sounds like it’s all sorted.

Mick O
Guest
Mick O

Interesting to me that the sign shows a cyclist wearing a mask.

Rain Waters
Guest
Rain Waters

Way over their heads

q
Guest
q

One thing I’ve heard, but don’t know if it’s true, is that Portland Public Schools has closed off several fields/open spaces to people. I understand there could be some justification to that if true–need to close sports fields to avoid people playing group sports, etc. But it seems inefficient to have PPS removing areas that lots of recreation seekers (walkers, joggers, kids biking or playing) would like (or prefer) while those same people are adding to the demand for street and sidewalk space, placing a greater burden on PBOT.

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

You wouldn’t know we’re in the middle of a
pandemic based on all the families playing at the elementary school near 71st and Woodward. My wife, dogs, and child walk through there all the time.

The Real Fred
Guest
The Real Fred

I guess the most shocking thing to me about this map is that it has made me realize just how awful slash nonexistent the greenways network is in SW Portland. I’ve seen the markings on the pavement but never paid much attention. We have a grand total of one steep-ish and very bumpy street between Terwillger and Hillsdale, and some neighborhood streets in Maplewood that don’t really go anywhere.

Clearly the greenways network is really for the bike-telligensia east of the river. Good on ya for getting yourselves some space to ride, but it’s not happening west of the river.

Chris I
Guest
Chris I

I grew up in SW, on a steep, bumpy street. Where would you put in neighborhood Greenways? Where would you put diverters? The topography and disconnected street network makes it nearly impossible.

David Hampsten
Guest

For starters, I’d close off Multnomah to through traffic, make it local traffic only, as the street is already pretty level. I’d also close off parts of both Capitol & Vermont to through traffic. I’d remove a car lane in each direction for BH Highway & Barbur, force drivers to use I-5 for through traffic, which is what they should be doing anyway. Any other multi-lane street should be fair game for losing a lane in each direction, same as in East P. The idea is not to block all car traffic, but just to make it a lot less convenient to drive and easier and safer to bike and walk.

q
Guest
q

Based on my experience with N/NE and SW, N/NE has far more need for greenways. So many of the streets in N/NE are straight, flat, grid-pattern streets with sidewalks. Those all combine to create lots of thru traffic traveling fast.

SW in contrast has lots of dead ends, lots of other streets that continue but don’t connect to others outside pockets of houses, lots of low density, and lots of curving, narrow and hilly streets without sidewalks. Those all combine to limit thru traffic and speeds.

SW also has the Willamette Greenway Trail and lots of parks for riding away from traffic. I’d guess parents wanting safe streets to ride with kids, or anyone wanting to ride with limited traffic, have several times more options than in N/NE. That’s not saying SW has enough greenways, or doesn’t have other problems for people biking.

Matt S.
Guest
Matt S.

My in-laws live off Palatine St in SW and there isn’t any nearby streets worthy of bike greenways. The terrain is just too steep and it’s too much of a “suburb”.

SJ
Guest
SJ

So I can effectively calm traffic on say, SE 103rd and Harold, with a couple of saw horses and orange barrels? $100 doesn’t sound too bad when I can mitigate the speeding, failures to stop and the noise.

Chris
Guest
Chris

Yesterday, 5/17, SE 48th was ‘closed’ by a repurposed PBOT barricade and a trash can. It looked like the residents were having a street party. No permits were evident. NB traffic on 48th had to turn right on Alder.

I’ve written a complaint to the city, but doubt anything will come of it.

This is why we can’t have nice things.