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What does Patrick Cashman have against the World Naked Bike Ride?

Posted by on May 29th, 2019 at 10:37 am

A man named Patrick Cashman has a bone to pick with Portland’s World Naked Bike Ride, the 9,000-rider strong annual event which will embark from Laurelhurst Park on June 29th.

Cashman has been on a personal crusade since late last year to hold ride organizers accountable to the letter of the law and to force the City of Portland to reveal the ride’s route.

“This information was developed in coordination with a small group of private citizens who are allowed to know this information while other private citizens are denied it.”
— Patrick Cashman

Back in November, Cashman penned an op-ed in The Oregonian urging others to join his demands to know the route of the popular ride. Cashman has also posted his concerns on Nextdoor. Between January and April of this year, he filed six separate public records requests with the City of Portland.

So far, he’s been denied each time.

The City has acknowledged that they’ve worked with Naked Bike Ride organizers, but they say a desire for public safety makes details of the route exempt from public records laws.

In the past five years the ride has averaged about 9,000 riders. It’s a massive undertaking that has long outgrown its spontaneous, unsanctioned beginnings (the first time BikePortland covered the ride in 2005 there were only 170 riders). For years now, ride organizers have worked in partnership with the City of Portland (including the Portland Police Bureau) to make sure the ride is as smooth and safe as possible. That collaboration has led to what Cashman feels is unfair treatment.

Cashman has a history of this type of activism. While living in Vermont in February 2018 he took issue with a public high school that flew a Black Lives Matter flag. Now in Portland, Cashman has accused our city government of playing favorites. In a letter (PDF) dated April 26th, 2019, in response to the City of Portland’s denials to his public records requests, Cashman wrote, “I contend that as this information was developed in coordination with a small group of private citizens who are allowed to know this information while other private citizens are denied it, the city is also engaged in selective disclosure.”

After a few people told me about Cashman, I contacted him to learn more about his concerns. Here’s our email exchange:

5/17/19

Hi Mr. Cashman,

I’ve heard about your inquiries to the DA’s office about the World Naked Bike Ride route.

I’ve covered the event for many years and I’m curious to know more about your feelings about it. Can you help me understand what your concern is? Are you simply curious about the route and don’t like that it’s kept a secret?

Thanks for your time.


Jonathan

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5/17/19

Mr. Maus,

Good afternoon.

I’m not a fan of the event (I think it’s rude to one’s neighbors) but that just my personal opinion and has no bearing on the rights of participants to do it. My major concern is with how the city handles it. There are three problems:

1. It’s an equal protection problem. The city must treat an individual in the same manner as others in similar conditions and circumstances. For this event the city is choosing to waive their administrative rules and notification requirements for a moving event permit for this particular applicant and event. I don’t know their motivation to provide this special treatment, but such low level corruption to favor preferred groups or people over others degrades trust in our democratic institutions and further encourages such corruption.

2. It’s a public records problem. The state public records laws are very clear; public documents belong to the public, the default condition is they are to be released on request unless a specific exemption is claimed and justified. The city has not claimed any exemption. Instead they have employees brazenly coordinating how to evade public records requirements because, (back to point 1), for some reason this group is getting very special treatment. That not only degrades trust and violates public records law, but it sets a precedent and is a giant warning sign that the city does not take its obligation to its citizens seriously. Additionally, one has to wonder; if they are going through this much effort over this minor event, what else are they up to to keep actual consequential documents out of the public’s hands?

3. The event, based on what I read on the WNBR page, will also be a violation of the judgment against the City in Gathright v. City of Portland*. The WNBR page states they will have event security enforcing a “no photography” rule and removing anyone who makes people feel unsafe. As ordered by the judge in Gathright the organizers had to sign a statement of understanding to affirm they understand the only rules in public parks are those imposed by lawful ordinance, event organizers don’t get to make their own rules. And park rules fully support non-commercial photography by whoever wants to do it. [*Note: Cashman pasted the relevant portion of the judgment in his email; but I’ve left it out for brevity’s sake.]

Let me know if you have any further questions. Thanks for asking

Patrick

5/17/19

Thank you for the responses Patrick.

I’m in an interesting position because I’m a participant, colleague/friend of many of the organizers over the years, and a journalist who prefers to keep a healthy distance when reporting about these events. That’s why your perspective on the event and actions around the route being made public are interesting to me.

Not sure if anyone has explained this to you yet, but the route is kept secret out of respect for the organizers who have spent years forging a productive working relationship with the Portland Police Bureau in order to keep this ride welcoming and safe for as many people as possible. The ride itself is unique: It’s free and put on by grassroots volunteers, it’s massive (and a major traffic consideration, hence the relationship with the PPB), and of course many of the people are naked.

While I understand your points about the letter of the law, many things our city and citizens do are in a grey area. That is, people come together to figure out a way to do something that might not fit perfectly inside the law, but that allows people to do what they want to do and gives the Police a feeling that public safety is assured. Take speeding in cars as an example. Police have a policy of not ticketing people until they go about 9-11 mph over the posted speed limit. That’s just one example.

Organizers of the Naked Bike Ride do not want people to target the participants in any way. They want to limit the amount of people who show up just to catcall, leer, and take photographs of nude strangers. While you may have no interest in doing any of those things, many people do. And because of that it seems reasonable to keep the location and route secret and to discourage photography at the start venue.

We can agree to disagree about this of course. I’m just trying to give you more context for why this event is treated like it is. Now keep in mind, I’m not on the inside. I have never played a role in organizing the event. If you’re interested, I could introduce you to one of the organizers.

Thanks again for your time. Have a nice weekend.

— Jonathan

5/18/19

Jonathan,

We’re going to have to agree to disagree. For me it is a matter of priority and from my perspective open, equitable, and accountable government comes before most anything else. Have a great weekend.

Patrick.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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pdxbusman
Subscriber
pdxbusman

I propose we get as many riders as possible to write “Hi Pat!” on their naked backsides.

J_R
Guest
J_R

Pat needs a new hobby. Like organizing something that doesn’t allow anyone to have fun.

Q
Guest
Q

Another ***insult deleted by moderator*** trying to police others behavior instead of living his own life. Sad.

Gary B
Guest
Gary B

Dear Patrick,

I’m interested in your preeminent concern with open, equitable, and accountable government, and how that’s the motivation for you. Accordingly, please provide evidence of all the other public records withholding determinations that you’ve challenged. Obviously you know the City makes disclosure exemption determinations on a regular basis. I ask you to share where you’ve challenged all of them, because surely you’re not targeting this particular event because it’s “rude.” Our shared interest in open and accountable government demands it.

Regards,
Gary

Karstan
Subscriber
Karstan

Mister Cashman also seems to have some problems with nonprofit media:

https://vtdigger.org/2012/12/16/schubart/

Glenn II
Guest
Glenn II

Both people make some pretty good arguments. I’m a disinterested party though. The WNBR is basically like Black Friday – something crowds of people swear is amazing.

Jason Skelton
Guest
Jason Skelton

I am sure after the event the city will provide documents about the route as he requests.

Ed
Guest
Ed

Dear Patrick,

Jonathan does make a good point regarding selective enforcement of the speed limit by Portland Police. I don’t know how many deaths have occurred as a result of the WNBR (zero?) but we all concur death occurs with regularity as a result of speeding motorists. As you have the public interest so much at heart I’m looking forward to reading of you insisting the city ticket ALL speeding motorists, regardless of how much over the limit they’re driving . This would include driving 21mph in a 20mph zone, right? The law is the law, right? Anything less is the selective enforcement so repugnant to you. Please let us know how this goes. Otherwise we might tend to think this is actually a ruse and you’re lying through your teeth about your motivations here. This might lead us to ask you to leave Portland and return to VT and continue your noble public service there. I bet your flag performance was really appreciated there, eh? They’d welcome you back with open arms. A question though; why Vermont then Portland? Wouldn’t you be happier in Texas, or Alabama? So many more kindred spirits there.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

I have no opinion about whether Cashman’s claims are valid, but transparency is a fundamental component of democracy, and it seems clear to me that the city should follow the law, whatever that is, and can only offer exemptions where legally permitted.

This strikes me as a relatively straightforward legal question.

I'll Show Up
Guest
I'll Show Up

Pat said that ” The state public records laws are very clear; public documents belong to the public, the default condition is they are to be released on request unless a specific exemption is claimed and justified.”

This comment shows his bias again the event itself is driving his passion. The city did provide the valid exemption related to public safety. Police keep a lot of information confidential due to public safety or because an investigation is ongoing. This is the same thing. Providing the information negatively impacts public safety (like the groping of women in Old Town) and the city has provided it as the reason they are exempting this from being a normal public record.

mran1984
Guest

Simple solution! Move back to the other coast and take about 250,000 folks with you.

FauxPorteur
Guest
FauxPorteur

Prediction: Patrick will attempt to file a lawsuit against the city in hopes of a cash settlement.

pdx2wheeler
Subscriber

Sounds like Patrick should have been named Richard instead…

bikeninja
Guest
bikeninja

Worrying about the degradation in trust of democratic institutions is almost always a red herring in place of something else more nefarious. I suspect the Patrick is some kind of front m an for Joey Gibson and Patriot Prayer or the Proud boys who would like to know the route so they could plan some kind of brawl with the participants. They figure such an altercation would give them the media attention their twisted brains desire.

Steven Alexander
Guest
Steven Alexander

Seems to me the police should be required to disclose arrangements with protesters (compare arrangements at issue with Patriot Prayer), but the interest of open government do not require disclosure *before* an event. “Hey, PPB, what are the deployment plans for that upcoming Patriot Prayer demo?”

Eric Leifsdad
Guest
Eric Leifsdad

I’m pretty sure the route will not interfere with his commute to Beaverton.

idlebytes
Guest
idlebytes

I tried engaging Patrick significantly last year and again this year in what I believe is his post on r/portland releasing the starting point. I’ve yet to get Patrick to cite the city policy or ordinance that doesn’t allow it to make exceptions to its permit requirements. He noted how the permit form says that the route is required but there’s no rules that I’ve been able to find that say the issuing body of a permit can’t make exceptions to the requirements. If he can’t provide that policy the rest of his complaints are kind of moot. He’s provided no evidence of another group that has been denied exceptions for similar reasons so there’s no discrimination. And if the city didn’t receive the route information with the permit it’s not public record so he has no right to it.

Last year he also seemed quite fixated on this idea of a conspiracy between PPB and the organizers as well. He was convinced they purposefully ignored his records request and when I pointed out to him that the city in general and especially the PPB has a bad record for responding to such requests and it’s likely not personal he ignored that information and continued to push his conspiracy theory.

Finally as others have noted I also found that he’s just trying to use the excuse of equal treatment to disrupt this event and even try to cancel it. It’s not even going to be in his neighborhood this year and he’s still trying to disrupt it.

Edward
Guest
Edward

His arguments are sort of good and he almost makes a good point. The problem is he doesn’t actually want “good government.” It’s just his best most compelling argument he can use to try to destroy something he doesn’t like. He conflates open secrecy with “corruption” which is a serious logical lapse. Open secrets happen all the time in a bunch of different scenarios (like bids for government contracts). Here, the city is openly saying that this event is going to be allowed to happen and that the police are going to be around to help with the route and they are working with the event organizers to help pick the route and staff it. The only part that is secret is the specific route from the starting point. He has ALL the information he needs to empower him to petition the government for redress, or to seek the specific records from years past to make other objections to how it is run, how the police respond to route selection options, etc., etc. He says he wants open, equitable, and accountable government. But he doesn’t. Looks like he just wants to use government rules to empower him to silence and exclude others. If he was stymied in his efforts to secretly negotiate a route for his own super popular event with 10,000+ people, that would be inequitable. But this? It’s just regular open, equitable, and accountable government … nakedly riding its bike down the street on a beautiful summer night with 10,000+ friends.

m
Guest
m

I think Cashman has some very strong arguments. Playing favorites in ignoring the law is a slippery slope and a foundation of governmental discrimination.

Jim Lee
Guest
Jim Lee

When a civil entity ignores prescribed regulations someone in authority likely is being paid off.

I would strongly support WNBR if Chief Outlaw were to show up along the route sporting a paintball gun.

pdxbusman
Subscriber
pdxbusman

Is Full Transparency the same as Full Monty? If it is, then there will be plenty of both at the WNBR!

Dan
Guest
Dan

The guy is a crank and is pursuing his crank hobby horse of “naked people having fun=bad and offensive!” in a perfectly legitimate way. I suppose we should celebrate that our so-called democracy still functions well enough for lone cranks to pursue their grievances through the relevant governing bodies.

Definitely do not get on this guy’s lawn though. 😉

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

I was wondering why I suddenly got a bunch of anonymous LinkedIn views.

A few points:

 The pdf letter linked in Jonathan’s piece above is my appeal to the Multnomah County DDA for a public records order.  A few excerpts:

Email from Deputy Ombudsman, Tony Green, dtd 4/26: “Yes, PBOT is intentionally not collecting the information in order to avoid having to turn it over as part of a public records request. But as I explain below, I think they have made a persuasive case as to why.”

Encl (6) – Email from Deputy Ombudsman, Tony Green, dtd 4/26: “There are many exemptions to disclosing public records. PBOT isn’t asserting one, however.”

Yes, there are exemptions to Oregon Public Records Law; 550 of them as a matter of fact (a fact everyone should be appalled by).  You can basically get an exemption by going to Salem and buying any legislator a ham sandwich.  Yet none of them apply and the City has not claimed any.  See https://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/2019/05/opinion-efforts-to-hide-government-records-never-stop.html

No, there is no grey area in public records law.  It’s binary; by default any public document is releasable on request UNLESS the agency claims a specific exemption written in law.  In the absence of such a claim, the document is to be disclosed.  From the ODOJ Public Order in re: Burke / Mail Tribune: “A public body that declines to disclose public records bears the burden of establishing that the records are exempt from disclosure.  The Oregon Court of Appeals has made it clear that there is an overall presumption in favor of disclosure and that the exemptions from disclosure are to be narrowly construed.”

When presented with the statement “We believe this event is unsafe if we obey state laws and apply the common set of administrative rules we apply to everyone else”, some petty functionary in PPB decided that the appropriate response was to waive the rules and evade public law.  Why they did this; because they knew the guys, or they liked their cause, or they preferred their color of skin, is irrelevant.  It isn’t acceptable.

For context I would also offer that in addition to my commentary objecting to flying the flag of a private corporation over a public school and “pay to play” nonprofit news outlets that use their favorable tax status to drive local newspapers (like the Times Argus) out of business, I also have written several commentaries on the abomination that is the traditional Town Meeting (https://vtdigger.org/2014/02/27/patrick-cashman-traditional-town-meeting-dilutes-suffrage-absentee-voters/) and in defense of Vermont Common Trust doctrine (https://www.vt-world.com/berlin-pond-belongs-to-all-vermonters.html).

Thanks for the use of the forum.  Enjoy the weather, I’m going gardening.

Scott Kocher
Guest

As Judge LaBarre noted eloquently in 2008, the World Naked Bike Ride is protected expression under the Oregon Constitution. It isn’t corruption for the City to sidestep a request or withhold records that would enable harassment of the people who choose to participate. https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2008/11/judge_throws_out_charges_again.html

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

Hi John,
PBOT admits to deliberately not writing the route down, so as to avoid public record requests. If they only talk about it then they can claim “no responsive documents” which is a trump card for municipal governments in Oregon as the DDA cannot compel them to prove a negative. As for BLM Vermont it is a corporation and trademark registered with the VT SoS to Ebony Nyoni of Winooski, see https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&source=web&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwiHyLGHgcLiAhXHjp4KHYVcA5AQzPwBCAM&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.sevendaysvt.com%2Fvermont%2Fwinooski-candidate-ebony-nyoni-has-competition-and-legal-trouble%2FContent%3Foid%3D12923194&psig=AOvVaw1jV-RhhDdlVGeLvTIbtVnB&ust=1559262891738310

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

The WNBR is absolutely protected expression under OR law, which is why I don’t like it but my personal opinion has no bearing on the participants’ right to do it. That doesn’t mean it automatically qualifies for any of the (550!!!) exemptions from disclosure.

Patric Cashman
Guest
Patric Cashman

I’ll Show Up,
What “public safety” exemption are you referring to?

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

I’ll,
What public safety exemption are you referring to?

idlebytes
Guest
idlebytes

Patrick cite the city ordinance or policy that says they are not allowed to make exceptions to their permit requirements. In the end you have no evidence that they can’t make an exception or that that have denied others such exceptions. So the route isn’t required for the permit or public record. And as others have pointed out what other rules the city isn’t enforcing are you advocating for? Have you gotten a ticket for going 1 mph over the speed limit recently? As you demonstrated last year this isn’t about law and order it’s your avenue to disrupt an event you don’t like.

At most you have made clear the city isn’t great at following records request laws something I pointed out to you last year. Something that has nothing to do with this event. An event btw that was part of the city for 12 years when you moved to 2.5 years ago.

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

Dear anonymous internet person,
Can you point out any state law that gives municipal employees the authority to make public records decisions? I get that it has been going on for a while, but that doesn’t make it right.

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

By the way, how about you use your name next time?

q
Guest
q

My real concern would be a legal challenge to the ride itself. Luckily it’s protected by the Second Amendment, unless someone successfully argues that it really is just a right to bare arms and not anything else.

David
Guest
David

Reading through the comments and links there is one thought that comes to mind: Where was Patrick Cashman during the comment period for the I-5 Rose Quarter project?

If you want to talk about a government organization hiding/withholding documents and coming up with false pretenses for just about every element they held a clinic. If your concern is equal protection (something along the lines of valuing the lives of middle schoolers the same as literally anyone else) this would seem to be straight-forward.

Having someone with the dogged determination to help uncover documents for that project would have been useful and a public service. Alas focusing on a bike ride seems to have so little upside as to be a waste of everyone’s time. Sure, he can state that personal opinions of the event have no bearing on the decision to repeatedly go after records associated with the event, however the appearance of this episode does not look quite so unbiased.

tldr; I get the desire for transparency, perhaps in the future find a target that could actually benefit people for generations to come rather than exposing them to harm (as has been stated elsewhere).

SD
Guest
SD

Individual moves to a new place and observes a cultural experience that they don’t understand. Because they are petty and monstrously entitled, they lash out.

KTaylor
Guest
KTaylor

I doubt I’d agree with Mr. Cashman on much else, but I would like to know the route of the World Naked Bike Ride so I can avoid it. I get around pretty much entirely on my bike and I’ve run into the ride route twice by accident in the past. If you’re not into that sort of thing, t can be creepy–especially as a woman riding alone at night. You get yelled at (festively) to take off your clothes by participants and (creepily) by onlookers. I just want to mind my own business and get home, onobserved and unremarked.

Middle of The Road Guy
Guest
Middle of The Road Guy

If I knew in advance there was going to be potential traffic problems, I’d avoid the area.

Running into something unawares often leads to frustration and negative outcomes.

idlebytes
Guest
idlebytes

He posted this story on r/portland and a reddit user found the DA’s response.I find it interesting he left out this important public record as it relates to his claims about the City not doing its job correctly. They seem to pretty clearly address his concerns and note that the route does not exist as a written public record so it cannot be provided for a request.
https://www.mcda.us/index.php/about-the-da/public-records-request/

George Dorn
Guest
George Dorn

The protest is a legal exercise of rights upheld repeatedly by the OR Supreme Court. WNBR coordinates with PBOT as a courtesy only. That coordination ensures the event disrupts the city as little as possible – one of the reasons the city police allow for ‘corking’ during Critical Mass events is that traffic flow is much better, on average, because of it.

Not announcing the route is a safety measure for the riders, and is a condition the organizers likely insisted on before coordination began. Public safety is a legitimate exemption. Cashman knows full well that requiring the route be made public would have a chilling effect on rider participation, the same way doxxing is used by the alt-right to scare off counter-protesters. Unfortunately, even if he wins, he loses, and so does the city at large; WNBR will be forced to stop coordinating with the city to ensure the event goes smoothly, and instead it will be an unsanctioned (but entirely legal) event that will disrupt traffic flows far worse than now.

Cashman is also entirely disingenuous about his motivations, which are only relevant because he keeps bringing them up. If he truly wanted fair and universal application of public records laws, there are a ton of much more incriminating collisions he should be digging into with the same fervor. Given his ire for BLM, though, I don’t really expect he’ll be asking PPB to turn over records regarding collusion with the Proud Boys any time soon.

Jim Lee
Guest
Jim Lee

John Lascurettes
What?Recommended 1

Girls just want to have fun.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

On a slightly different but related topic, does anyone happen to know if WNBR is permitted as a “large parade”, and, if so, whether they provide the advance notice required in the statute?

>>> Sponsors of athletic and large parade events with a closed course, shall notify residential complexes, neighborhood groups, businesses and churches which will be affected by the event closures. The notification shall be made not more than fourteen (14) days before, and not less than six (6) days prior to the event date. The notification shall be in writing <<<

That is a very clear requirement, and would seem to undermine the plan to keep the route secret.

Paul Tay
Guest
Paul Tay

pdxbusman
I propose we get as many riders as possible to write “Hi Pat!” on their naked backsides.Recommended 19

I’ll be writing #IamwithCashman on my skinny NAKED Chinaman ass. Good for Pat, calling for public transperancy. WNBR route secrecy, all good. Pat’s gub’mint transparency, not so much.

The public’s right to know ALL government actions trumps PUBLICALLY naked riders’ ridiculous pie-in-sky wish to not be catcalled. Don’t want to be catcalled? Don’t ride naked. #Boom

Paul Tay
Guest
Paul Tay

George Dorn
The protest is a legal exercise of rights upheld repeatedly by the OR Supreme Court. WNBR coordinates with PBOT as a courtesy only. That coordination ensures the event disrupts the city as little as possible – one of the reasons the city police allow for ‘corking’ during Critical Mass events is that traffic flow is much better, on average, because of it.Not announcing the route is a safety measure for the riders, and is a condition the organizers likely insisted on before coordination began. Public safety is a legitimate exemption. Cashman knows full well that requiring the route be made public would have a chilling effect on rider participation, the same way doxxing is used by the alt-right to scare off counter-protesters. Unfortunately, even if he wins, he loses, and so does the city at large; WNBR will be forced to stop coordinating with the city to ensure the event goes smoothly, and instead it will be an unsanctioned (but entirely legal) event that will disrupt traffic flows far worse than now.Cashman is also entirely disingenuous about his motivations, which are only relevant because he keeps bringing them up. If he truly wanted fair and universal application of public records laws, there are a ton of much more incriminating collisions he should be digging into with the same fervor. Given his ire for BLM, though, I don’t really expect he’ll be asking PPB to turn over records regarding collusion with the Proud Boys any time soon.Recommended 4

Claiming route disclosure would chill turnout has NO credibility.

Wanna beat Cashman? Simply give him what he wants.

Paul Tay
Guest
Paul Tay

Patrick Cashman
How about we stay on topic George?Instead of focusing on the infinite possibilities of what WNBR “could” do, stick to what they are doing; filing an incomplete moving event permit application, requesting exclusive use of City assets and personnel, ignoring neighborhood notification requirements, promising to impose their own rules in public parks, etc.Instead of focusing on what the City “could” do, stick to what they are doing: designating a preferred group based on some unknown characteristic or attribute, waiving common administrative and regulations in violation of City Ordinance for that preferred group, coordinating efforts among city employees to evade public records laws, etc.Fundamentally people get in a twist when corruption and privilege to their benefit is pointed out to them.  As with this you have to expect the plaintive wails of “ But, but, but…this is DIFFERENT!!!”It isn’t.  It’s just garden variety corruption and cronyism in action.Recommended 2

#IamwithCashman

Carolyn
Guest

I admit I’ve not read all of the comments above. But as the person who came up with the “Safety” Theme for the 2006 WNBR Dance Party (yes, we brought back the martini rider and he wasn’t necessarily the safest bike lane art but the most celebratory), AND as someone who has worked as a public servant responding to public information requests, my thoughts are this.

If I were the city official receiving his public information request, I would first point out that the route is ultimately NOT a secret. Right now it is. And it is secret for a legitimate reason, safety. I don’t recall public information requests being held to a standard of ASAP – for example, I worked at a granting agency and we knew well in advance of who would get funding and who would not of the “official” notice. And if an applicant asked, which is a public information request, we had not obligation to reveal because the information would be revealed soon enough.

Second, even if the information was never revealed, if it is the safety of thousands of people at stake, why would his request be more important?
Public safety is NOT cronyism. It is NOT a preferred group.
Giving him information that would risk thousands of people would make HIM the preferred group. Just because a citizen demands information doesn’t mean he is entitled to get it.

I’ve personally made the decision never to participate in the ride again (which, I recall, in 2015 and 2016 we had several elected officials whom I will not name specifically. Those early days, it was a civic event) because it no longer feels safe. When people talk about it, I rarely hear the original motivations for the ride mentioned. But I digress.

What’s puzzling to me is he lives in SW where we don’t even get Sunday Parkways much less be included in something like this. He’s clearly emotional about it, though. We have so many more issues in this city to be discussing.

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

“Just because a citizen demands information doesn’t mean he is entitled to get it.”
Actually Carolyn, yes “he”is entitled to get it. That’s actually the very core right of equitable, accountable and transparent government.
“A public body that declines to disclose public records bears the burden of establishing that the records are exempt from disclosure.  The Oregon Court of Appeals has made it clear that there is an overall presumption in favor of disclosure and that the exemptions from disclosure are to be narrowly construed.””

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

Chris,
You are correct in that I have exactly zero empathy for anyone who misuses the public trust to hook up their friends, nor should any of us. What concerns me is the stunning lack of empathy demonstrated here for those who ultimately pay the price for corrupt and obscure government through biased and unfair treatment, prejudiced policies enacted to benefit the favored few, funneling assets and assistance to favored groups at the expense of all others. The entitled privilege on display is really quite shameful. But hey, at least some folks get to ride their bikes naked, so totally worth it.

Carrie
Guest
Carrie

Patrick Cashman
What concerns me is the stunning lack of empathy demonstrated here for those who ultimately pay the price for corrupt and obscure government through biased and unfair treatment, prejudiced policies enacted to benefit the favored few, funneling assets and assistance to favored groups at the expense of all others. The entitled privilege on display is really quite shameful.

As an earlier commentor said, I really, really wish Patrick had this much passion around the ODOT Rose Quarter Environmental Assessment and public process. And used it as his poster child of government obfuscation for the privilege of favored groups. If an open and transparent gov’t is truly his goal. Which I really don’t think it is.

Patrick Cashman
Guest
Patrick Cashman

As a statement, instead of responses which I have mostly been providing, to anyone who has a nagging voice whispering to them “I like the WNBR, but I like open government, but I don’t want anyone to get hurt….”; please consider the element of choice.  In the WNBR we have a group of consenting adults choosing to participate in an event that, regardless of whether the route is disclosed or not, will always contain some degree of danger.  It’s not as if the police will be ordering everyone else to remain in their homes. There will be people on the streets and some of them may decide to break our common laws and do something shameful, and hopefully they will be arrested and charged.  But the participants in this got the opportunity to choose and chose to participate.  The downstream recipients of the effects of the City’s misbehavior in support of the WNBR get no choice in the matter.  If corruption is rewarded with success it encourages more corruption (at a minimum it certainly doesn’t discourage more corruption), and it won’t be the participants in the WNBR paying the price.

Dan A
Subscriber
Dan A

Sounds to me like somebody is practicing their language for a future manifesto.

CaptainKarma
Guest
CaptainKarma

Signing out until after 2019 WNBR.