Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

The Monday Roundup: Bicycle Day, DC defends bike lanes, e-bikes’ mental health boost, and more

Posted by on February 25th, 2019 at 9:29 am


Here are the most noteworthy things on the web we came across in the past seven days…

Bring back Bicycle Day: Before the Presidents Day holiday was used to sell cars it was a “day of leisure” that many people took as an opportunity to ride and race bicycles.

Worst Day Ride Photos: Don’t miss these great photos from The Oregonian that captured the costumes and spirit at yesterday’s Worst Day of the Year Ride.

Speed kills: A new study has shown that higher speed limits on eastern Oregon highways — passed by the Oregon legislature in 2015 — have led to more fatal crashes.

ITE on parking: The influential Institute for Transportation Engineers has issued a promising new policy stance in the latest issue of their magazine: removal of parking minimums, more use of pricing tech to manage demand, and the promotion of different modes.

Lime is over bikes: Interesting to see that a company that once operated both shared e-scooters and bikes has decided to drop the latter.

DC defends its bike lanes: The District of Columbia has decided to get tough on Uber/Lyft drivers and delivery trucks who think they can stop in bike lanes by clarifying existing bike lane law. It’s being done as part of D.C.’s Vision Zero program.

Advertisement

State of safety: A good overview of why more vulnerable road users are being hit and killed in U.S. cities and what it will take to do something about it.

What do we want? More bike parking!: The SF Bike Coalition is demanding the City of San Francisco triples the number of bike racks and respond more quickly to bike parking requests.

NYPD hates cycling: The Bike Snob shares an overview of a problem we’ve noted for years: That behind all their infrastructure and other urbanism successes lies a terrible barrier to bike-friendliness — the police.

Mental health and e-bikes: Research has shown that electric-assisted bikes not only make pedaling easier for older people, they can also provide a mental health boost.

Slow buses: Portland is working to speed up buses, many of which are stuck in traffic behind car drivers. In New York City, activists on foot challenged a bus to a race across town and they only lost by five seconds.

Unspent bike/walk funds: Streetsblog reports on $1 billion in unspent federal funds lying in state coffers that could be rescinded if they don’t get used. And yes, Oregon is on the list to the tune of about $12 million. Is this a big deal? We’re inquiring with ODOT and hope to share more info soon.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

Never miss a story. Sign-up for the daily BP Headlines email.

BikePortland needs your support.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

41
Leave a Reply

avatar
17 Comment threads
24 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
22 Comment authors
todd boulangerHello, Kitty9wattsSDTim Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Abe H.
Guest
Abe H.

We have a Bicycle Day. April 19th.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

Some comments about the ITE Journal issue on parking: 1) They are really arguing for “right sizing” parking, which means not over (or under) building; this seems primarily targeting the large seas of unused parking we see at malls and other large developments. They say “strategies must be in place to assure that parking supply will satisfy demand.” 2) They say that when offstreet parking is not required, there should be steps taken to ensure parking does not spill over onto the street; in Portland’s case of no-parking apartment buildings, this would mean restricting residents in “no parking” buildings from parking on the streets, probably using some sort of permitting system. 3) They argue that public perception has to be taken into account, so the public understands that new parking policies “will not impact people’s lives”.

9watts
Subscriber

Bikes = leisure; cute in 1895, not sure how strategic that would be if exhumed in 2019

bikeninja
Guest
bikeninja

With the slow speed of the bus depicted in the slow bus story (4 mph) perhaps we should adopt some technology from an earlier time and just have some buses with open sides and running boards so passengers can just leap on and off while the bus is moving.

9watts
Subscriber

From the piece on why those outside of cars are less safe, why deaths are rising, no answers, but some interesting pull quotes:

“Most pedestrians and bicyclists are killed or injured while they are obeying the law.”

“While pedestrian deaths in Norway declined by 37 percent from 2010 to 2016, in the United States they increased by 39 percent.”

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

Bring back Bicycle Day: Gladly, this is the first time I’m hearing that Washington’s birthday is used to sell cars. I thought it was just the usual excuse to sell anything.

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

Slow buses: If they only lost by 5 seconds then that won by several minutes. The reason they lost is because they didn’t start walking when they got to the bus stop, but instead waited for the bus to arrive and start leaving. That’s not a real-world scenario. When I get to the bus stop to find that the bus is delayed (or traffic is at a standstill) I don’t wait for it to arrive before I start walking to my destination.

Allan Rudwick
Subscriber

saw a lot of tandem bikes out their on the worst day of the year. awesome work portlanders!

mark
Guest
mark

I believe that the allowance is for active loading and unloading only, but I often see Uber/Lyft drivers parked in the lane waiting for their fares to show up. It it extremely frustrating to see these alleged professional drivers flout the law for their convenience. I sometimes stop next to them to advise them that the bike lane is not for parking, and the drivers respond in one of two ways: stare straight ahead and refuse to make eye contact, or tell me some variation of, “I’m not parked; I’ve got my flashers on.”

It is clear to me that the city only provides lip service to cycling as a legitimate means of transport.

SD
Guest
SD

Everyone knew that deaths and injuries would increase with increased speed limits in Eastern Oregon. Did we have to do this experiment to prove it? The legislators who backed the higher speed limits have blood on their hands and should step down.

Matthew in PDX
Guest
Matthew in PDX

I wonder if the DC rule apply to law enforcement vehicles? Certainly, any NYC rules don’t apply to the NYPD. I wonder if Portland rules apply to PPB.

Hello, Kitty
Subscriber
Hello, Kitty

Safety might not be the only consideration in Eastern Oregon. It is, and should be, an important factor, but no one that trumps everything else. The article (brief as it is) does suggest ODOT is taking steps to implement the recommendations in the safety study to help mitigate the increased danger.

“Blood on their hands” is a bit dramatic.

morgan
Guest
morgan

From Outside magazine (online) today: “Bike Commuters Are Dying in Record Numbers”
https://www.outsideonline.com/2390525/bike-commuter-deaths

tl;dr: 840 cycling fatalities in 2016 in the U.S., surpassing the previous high of 836 in 1991.

David Hampsten
Guest

The LimeBike headline is not quite accurate. They are keeping some bikes for their markets where scooters are also allowed (though they are reducing bike fleets there too.) This is partly because many cities have limited how many scooters any one company can have, so the bikes are for the excess demand.

David Hampsten
Guest

Rules schmules. As in Portland or in my city, it always boils down to enforcement, which in DC is often lacking if you are far from the tourist/government areas.

Ed
Guest
Ed

Great to see the Bike Snob piece and that clip of walkers almost beating a NYC bus! I read often, inclusing here in bikeportland, of how we’re falling so far behind New York in active transportation etc. And it can look that way on paper but these accounts tell you what it’s really like there – as a cyclist or pedestrian. I’ve seen this myself there and glad to see the myth bubble popped. I say the reason bike and bus lanes exist in Brooklyn or Manhattan (and are tolerated) is it gives motorists (especially cops) a place to double park 😉 We may not be perfect here, but by US standards anyway (admittedly very very low) Portland still ranks highly for walkers and cyclists so don’t believe the hype about it there in NYC.

todd boulanger
Guest
todd boulanger

Per the “NYPD hates cycling” article…it is also reflected in how NYPD [institutionally] does not really care about pedestrian safety either…what with its chronic NYPD vehicle parking on the sidewalks [and placard abuse] surrounding precinct stations. (This is such the canary in the coal mine….and I am surprised that there have been no effective ADA lawsuits about it too.) https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2018/04/20/108th-precinct-cracks-down-on-sidewalk-parking-nypd-placard-holders-not-included/