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The Monday Roundup: Privileges, disadvantages, justice, trees, and more

Posted by on May 7th, 2018 at 9:53 am

Here are the best stories we came across in the past seven days…

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City Council candidate interviews: Still undecided? Don’t miss interviews with the five candidates vying to replace City Commissioner Dan Saltzman by OPB Radio reporter Amelia Templeton.

Must-read interview: Danish architect and city planning consultant Jan Gehl is revered among urbanists and transportation reformers. City Lab nabbed a great interview with him where he touches on the corporate-fueled technology dream (he’s unimpressed) and how we should count people like traffic engineers count cars.

No justice: A necessary dive into the sad case of Anita Kurmann in Boston, where the systemic bias against bicycle users and victim-blaming within law enforcement agencies is laid bare.

Justice: The Michigan man who purposely drove his car into a group of riders in Michigan was found guilty on for counts of murder.

Motorized bikes FTW: Seattle is just the latest city to get all giddy about the potential of electrified bicycles.

The right to drive dangerously: The Philly Voice provides this week’s takedown of the National Motorists Association, a pro-car group with an army of emailers defending the rights of drivers nationwide.

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Bike share data: Don’t miss this deep-dive compilation of bike share statistics published by NACTO. One surprising tidbit: dockless bikes made up a whopping 44 percent of the total bikes available, but just 4 percent of the total trips, leading Streetsblog to wonder if that deflates the dockless hype.

Contested streets in LA: A fascinating look at the intersection between the personal struggle for safe mobility on public streets and the gangs who control it.

Not their fault: Another example that you simply cannot proclaim to care about equity unless you aggressively battle climate change.

How to tame your white privilege: This post on Colorlines from a community organizer from the Tohono O’odham Nation, features solid advice about how to check your privilege and work with people who don’t look like you. It’s very applicable to the transportation advocacy world here in Portland.

Trees are lit: I like to think bicycle riders are the most powerful force in creating great cities, but this article has me thinking trees might be the real winners.

New book alert: The Gospel of Donald Shoup has been updated. I repeat, the God of Parking Reform has published a new book!

Londoners are over cars: Since their mayor said she’d consider it, thousands of London residents have signed a petition saying they want a carfree day this fall.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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bikeninja
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bikeninja

My favorite part from Jan Gehl’s interview, ” I think we haven’t thought through the challenge of technology for city mobility. We are stuck with some 120-year-old ideas that the industry is desperately holding on to.”
Its time to cut loose the auto and petroleum industry from their self appointed role as master planner of our living space. Lets send them to the same dustbin of history as those who promoted the idea that the sun revolved around the earth.

Josh
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Josh

“dockless trips made up a whopping 44 percent of the total bike share trips, but 4 percent of the total”
I think there was an editing error here, I’m not sure what the takeaway is supposed to be.

John Liu
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John Liu

Streetsblog:

“Dockless bike-share carried just 4 percent of all bike-share trips in 2017, according to NACTO’s estimates, despite accounting for 44 percent of all shared bikes. On a per-bike basis, station-based systems yielded an average of 1.7 rides per day, compared to 0.3 rides per day for dockless systems.”

“a business model that relies on cheap equipment and low maintenance costs”

“It’s possible to provide dockless systems that also have well-built equipment, reliable maintenance, and operations that don’t skimp on rebalancing — and maybe systems like that will get more use. We just haven’t seen one yet, at least not at scale.”

BikeTown will be the quality non profit dockless system. If we have a little patience. Letting for profit companies dump 10,000 bikes in Portland, put BikeTown and others out of business, then leave the surviving company with a for profit monopoly, is a bad idea.

K'Tesh
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K'Tesh

The Michigan man who purposely drove his car into a group of riders in Michigan was found guilty on FOUR counts of murder.

soren
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soren

“unless you aggressively battle climate change.”

considering that we are emitting more greenhouse gases than we ever have i have to wonder who this “you” is.

Hello, Kitty
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Hello, Kitty

Regarding the trucker that killed the cyclist in Boston, why do we, as a matter of policy, permit vehicles that are demonstrably unsafe for city driving drive around our cities?

Anne
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Anne

Oh hey, Jonathan.
London’s mayor is a man, Sadiq Khan.

Pete
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Pete

Interesting photo of the truck driver right-hooking the cyclist he killed in Boston… note the sharrows where his right front is. Some might contend she’d still be alive today if she was positioned where the sharrows recommended.

The intersection looks very different today: https://goo.gl/maps/5fUxMjH9fp42. The bike lane has a small buffer, placing the cyclist even closer to the curb than the former sharrows did. And there are bike boxes for box lefts – now that’s a rarity! That design here in California would have turned out quite different – there’d be 100′ of dotted gore line and the bike lane would be shared as a right-turn lane with cars (i.e. it’d be a fustercluck…).

Lester Burnham
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Lester Burnham

Total crickets on the “white privilege”. Interesting. There is more work to be done.

Hello, Kitty
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Hello, Kitty

My reaction was to think that while I don’t see the connection to cycling, Cazares-Kelly describes some pretty insensitive people.

9watts
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9watts

Kyle Banerjee
You mean not allow trucks in cities? Yeah, that’ll work….Recommended 3

Why so glib?
To my knowledge no European city allows semi trucks to plow around the inner cities.

GlowBoy
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GlowBoy

q
Turning across the lane to the right is inherently dangerous.Recommended 2

And trucks often swing wide, effectively turning across a lane to the right, whether or not there is a bike lane.

Even if cars were to pull into the bike lane to turn, as required in California (and Minnesota where I live*), 52′ trucks are still going to turn from a travel lane.

* having lived with it for three years now, I hate hate HATE this law. It is NOT safer to have cars weaving with bikes in the bike lane. Too often turning traffic clogs up the bike lane, forcing cyclists to choose between stopping and waiting, or moving around to the left into the general lane with cars that are going straight at much higher speeds than the cars that are turning. Maybe a few S&F types prefer passing on the left, but I sure as hell don’t. I would MUCH rather monitor the right-hook danger from cars on my left, something I got pretty good at after nearly two decades in Portland.

Even if you don’t have a bike lane, on any type of road motor vehicles are going to pass slower bicycles on the left. And when they make right turns, they are going to cross the paths of cyclists. Getting rid of bike lanes, as some VCers propose, or adopting the dumb California law, will not substantially improve our safety. There is no magic sword to slay the right hook, but the danger can be mitigated, however, with enforcement, awareness, light timing (possibly combined with full mode separation), and modifying or restricting large trucks.

Jim Labbe
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Jim Labbe

Speaking of trees, come on the Epic Street Tree Ride:

http://www.orangesplot.net/ride/